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Thread: 375 ruger alaskan porting

  1. #1
    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Default 375 ruger alaskan porting

    Has any had theirs ported and who did it and have you had good results? Show me a pic. If it wasnt for the hogue buttpad Id have a real hard time hangin on to the thing. It sure shoots straight though. I got a burris 1.5-6x40. The eye relief on ithis scope isnt quit enuff for the recoil of this rifle. I love the scope though. soo I migh as well spend 500bucks and customize it. Hopefully I get a stimulus check to pay for it. Obama would be proud im sure!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Hang in there guys well win this one.
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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    I have a Ruger .375 Alaskan, I love it. The recoil was a bit firm so I opted for a Vais muzzle brake.

    http://www.muzzlebrakes.com/index.htm

    I am very pleased with this brake. It reduced recoil to a very manageable feel. The Vais brake has forward facing holes in addition to the traditional rear facing holes. The forward facing holes reduce noise sent back towards the shooter.

    I also installed a Timney trigger. The trigger improved the feel and it's adjustable. Mine is set at 3.0 pounds.

    http://www.timneytriggers.com/sunsho...7-MKII-24.html

    I also reload for this rifle. I use RL-15 74.5gr with CCI 250 primers. COL @ 3.340 with Nosler Accubond 260gr bullets at 2820fps. This load, trigger, brake combination lays down a consistant .72" group all day long.

    I've recently started working with Barnes 270gr TSX. I'm getting better accuracy but the velocity is a bit slow. I'm going to try a different powder to try improve the velocity.

    The Hornady 270gr ammo was pretty lame. The best my rifle shot with it was 2" groups at 100 yards. I hope this information helps you with your decisions.
    Last edited by marshall; 02-18-2009 at 20:01. Reason: typo

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    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Smile yup

    I am getting the about the same groups with the hornady fact. stuff. But I chalked it up to the fact maybe the recoil was throwing me off. And its not the recoil screwing me up its the barrel jump from the short barrel. I get that with my original 450 marlin with 18" ported barrel when I load up to a hot load. I have a timney on my ruger 300 winmag and it made huge difference in my ability to get the best group. But I do like the new ruger trigger. In the past Ive used mostly the 300winmag and the occasional 338 so it took me a few boxes to get control of the 375. Although with max loads my 300 kicks just about as hard. But its a different type of recoil.
    I do enjoy shooting the .375 ruger Theres just something about it. Im a ruger fan (its the only brand I will hunt with in southeast alaska). And I just had to buy it Its like it was calling me. Ive had it since last winter. . I havnt killed with it yet but it isnt for lack of trying. Also I think its way cool that if you can keep your eye open all the way thru the shot all you can see thru the scope is fire!!

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    I too am a Ruger fan, to the bone. I know there are better rifles out there but they're not for me.

    I have the .375 Alaskan, .204 Predator, M77 .30-06, 44mag Red Hawk, 454 Casull Alaskan, (2) LCP's, and a new Tactical .308 just arrived today.

    The new .308 has the same Houge stock as the 375 and a 20" heavy barrel with a recessed target crown. The trigger is a two stage adjustable target model and it feels nice. I just loaded up 7 varieties of ammo for the .308 tonight. Now I need to get a good scope and hit the range.

    As far as the recoil on the .375 with a brake it's not bad at all. I would say it feels like the 30-06 with average loads.

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    That rifle is in no need of a muzzle device or porting it is in need of a stock. Save your smithing money and spend it on a good McMillan hunter style stock in your favorite color, then bed it properly and watch your groups tighten. It seems odd to me that folks will put up with mediocre shooting in that soft squishy stock when they could find the rifles potential with a properly stocked rifle.

    This stock will also reduce the felt recoil of that rifle and increase its value. Barrel ports and certainly muzzle brakes will reduce value. Besides, after the new stock the recoil will feel like the 30-06.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    new stock and a straight-tube leupold (fixed 2.5, 1x4, or 1.5x5) mounted way forward....

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Owning the Burris scope is a big problem. I'd give that scope a good kick to ebay to unload it. And proceed to get a Leupold for great glass, weight savings, and industry-best eye-relief.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    That rifle is in no need of a muzzle device or porting it is in need of a stock. Save your smithing money and spend it on a good McMillan hunter style stock in your favorite color, then bed it properly and watch your groups tighten. It seems odd to me that folks will put up with mediocre shooting in that soft squishy stock when they could find the rifles potential with a properly stocked rifle.

    This stock will also reduce the felt recoil of that rifle and increase its value. Barrel ports and certainly muzzle brakes will reduce value. Besides, after the new stock the recoil will feel like the 30-06.
    Love your advice and knowledge, Murphy. I posted awhile back about your book and got some indirect answers ...Are you going to publish the book? Is everything going OK? Count me in for buying at least one if you do...


    Brian

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    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Cool open to anthying

    Well I im not gonna ditch my scope. I can work with it. Besides I like it and it is a decent quality optic. The reason I chose it iover the straight tubes is the 40mm exit tube. Awesome field of view is nice to have in the dark woods of southeast. But i dont know a **** thing about glass bedding. Im not a dummie but im more a bolt on type of guy. Do you have to send the rifle to Mcmillan to get it done right? The Idea of blasting my cranium out with a muzzle brake isnt most appealing for me either. Wasnt sure what else to do. I put A full aluminum block bedded hogue on my .300win mag ruger to replace original laminate one. Its a more comfortable and forgiving stock but I didnt see A relative change in accuracy other than the ergonomic aspect.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Murphy View Post
    That rifle is in no need of a muzzle device or porting it is in need of a stock. Save your smithing money and spend it on a good McMillan hunter style stock in your favorite color, then bed it properly and watch your groups tighten.

    This stock will also reduce the felt recoil of that rifle and increase its value.
    That is some great advice right there. FWIW, I have a Ruger M77 in 338WM that though it was shootable with the factory tupperware stock, I had it bedded into a McMillan Classic w/ a 1" decelerator pad and it absolutely transformed it into a very fun and accurate gun to shoot now. A lot of folks dont understand what a quality stock does to a gun, nor are they willing to spend the money to find out. Not to mention the resale value of a quality stock like a McM seldom loses value.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I'll also second the notion of a new stock if you find it unshootable. I didn't like the flexibility in the factory stock although that soft recoil pad was pretty nice. I'd give myself some time shooting it before spending any serious cash. The first box through mine took some gritting of the teeth to try not to flinch. After a hundred rounds it was pretty managable. I'd avoid the porting or a brake- the rifle has enough blast as is without adding more holes.

    A friend of mine chopped his .338 to 20" and added a brake- that thing was like setting off dynamite tied to a broomstick. Severe is about a good description as any.

    I also put a Burris on mine (a 1.75-5x32) and never came close to getting hit with the scope.

  12. #12
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    Thumbs up good shooter

    The rifle is far from unshootable. Im happy with the setup and have been using it in the field whenever I get the chance. My 300 has been collecting dust since I got the 375. I was just looking for some options on some positive refinement thats all. And actully the hogue stock is fairly ergonomic for me and the butt pad is the most forgiving I have ever used. Il probably save for the mcmillian but sounds its about 800-900 smackers all said and done soo it might be awhile. At first thats why the muzzle break seemed most appealing because I could get that done for half the price or maybe less. But whats the point if its not that great of a solution. I have shot a 340 wby before and after porting and it was amazing it shot like an 06 after.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Magnum Man View Post
    Il probably save for the mcmillian but sounds its about 800-900 smackers all said and done soo it might be awhile.
    Just to clarify, a McMillan is $425 to you rdoor in Alaska, not $800 or $900.

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    Member Magnum Man's Avatar
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    Smile confused

    If I get the new mcmillian will it bolt right on or is the glass required for the correct fit?. I guess I should have asked this on my first post. sorry.

  15. #15

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    That is completely up to you. Some guys just install em and go shoot, some guys bed em in various manners. With a 375 Ruger I would bed it for sure if it were me.

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