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Thread: Bedding question

  1. #1

    Default Bedding question

    I am new to gunsmithing but decided i want to try and bed the stock on my winchester model 70. All of the information i have found on bedding is dealing w/ wood or fiberglass stocks. Can injection molded stocks even be bedded? If so, any tips would be appreciated.

  2. #2
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    I have seen several Winchester M-70's glass bedded into the plastic stock (own one). As you will see, pull your barreled action out of the stock and see what you have to work with. There are some large hollowed out spaces there that limit what you can do without adding a lot of weight. I put some graphite rods in the fore-end of mine and bedded them in to stiffen things up. Also removed some material from the lug recess and bedded there as well as in the tang area. It's not light by any means, but didn't cost an arm and a leg for a glass bed kit. My rifle likes some fore-end pressure so I had to allow for that. Good luck.

  3. #3
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    The problem with the injection molded stocks is getting the stuff to "stick". Go to Brownells website, search accraglass gel, then download the instructions. They will tell you all about the cautions of doing the molded stocks. Ive done one on a winnie, I followed their instructions, and it has held up well so far.

  4. #4

    Default bedding composite stock

    To fill in the "hollows" inside the stock, just spritz enough expandable foam like that used around doors and windows into them, then trim and sand smooth. To get the glas bedding compound to stick, you can rough up the inner surfaces of the stock with rough sandpaper and also when you remove some material from around the recoil lug, leave the surface rough. That should do the trick. I have even used a small diameter drill to drill very shallow holes at angles into the composite material to actually act as little anchors.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by mauserboy View Post
    To fill in the "hollows" inside the stock, just spritz enough expandable foam like that used around doors and windows into them, then trim and sand smooth. To get the glas bedding compound to stick, you can rough up the inner surfaces of the stock with rough sandpaper and also when you remove some material from around the recoil lug, leave the surface rough. That should do the trick. I have even used a small diameter drill to drill very shallow holes at angles into the composite material to actually act as little anchors.
    Good stuff Mauserboy!
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  6. #6
    Member hntr's Avatar
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    Default bedding

    I've done several and it always helped accuracy. If you want a free floated barrel then you have to remove a lot of the tip of the forarm in the barrel channel because the plastic stocks flex quite a bit. They recommend drilling some shallow holes in the area where you are placing the bedding compound for it to adhere to.

    I put two layers of electric tape on the round part of the action where it meets the flat of the magazine on both sides. This will raise the action up so you only get two points of contact at the recoil lug and the tang. Look for barrel contact and rasp away some of the stock if you wish. Use a file, a dremel will come out uneven.

    Also put two layers of tape on the front and sides of just the recoil lug for clearance once the compound dries. Coat everything including tape in release agent, put compound in the recoil lug area and the tang behind the screw hole, put the action in the stock, screw the screws in so that they are touching the bottom metal (make sure the screws and the screw holes on the action are also coated in release agent) and wrap a bungee cord around the middle of the action just enough to hold the action in the stock but not flex the stock. After dry you can check clearances between the bedding areas on the action with a business card and if any tight spots remove with sandpaper. Also file down any compound that squirted into the magazine box area and trigger area, and run a round file through the screw holes to clear some of the dry compound out.

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