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Thread: Goat hunt weights?

  1. #1
    Member dieNqvrs's Avatar
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    Default Goat hunt weights?

    Is it possible for two hunters to carry two goats deboned with full hides. I was curious if some of you can help me on the weight of a deboned Goat and a full body skin with horns. Either nanny or billy. Plan on spiking out for a few days and wondering if possible to carry a small camp and carry out a whole goat to ones self in one trip back to drop off point?

    Thank you for any info!

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Default

    It can be done if in good shape and if you went to the field light.Did it by myself and walked out with about 150# on my back but only had to go about five miles

  3. #3
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Default

    I hunt solo so any game I get has to come out by my own power. Yes a goat is doable as long as it's done smart and carefully, sometimes not even then. On moderate terrain a trevoy can be very helpful. (trevoy=2 poles use like a wheel barrow pulled behind you) For my November registration hunt last year I used a polk/mountaineering sled. I came home empty but that sled sure made the pack in and out lighter.

    Don't underestimate the importance of pre season training. I have already started doing tri weekly hikes in alpine conditions and light weight training in preparation for the upcoming season. If you fail to put in the training time necessary you will fail in your hunt, Goats make sheep look like cowards and they are much harder to put down!
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  4. #4
    Member anonymous1's Avatar
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    Default Not By Me

    But I know two guys who did it and I`m sure they had all the uasable meat. Me and my pard have a hard time with just one and our spike gear. Once we rolled all the gear bags and tent in a big ball tied it up good in a tarp. We put it on a long teather and rolled it down hill a head of us. Worked pretty good till the teather broke and it went the wrong way but I know if you pack light clean the meat up really really good and go slow you can make. Cuz these two did bout killed em though
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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default goats...

    Mountain goats always surprise me with how big they are dead on the ground. And then they always surprise me how much of the goat does not have to be packed out.

    I have only packed out eight goats. Deboned meat ready to be sliced/ground and wrapped, "green" front cape and head-hornes. I can not generally do it alone. Although I did a very small, young billy one time by myself, along with my gear.

    The problem I have had is not the total weight on level ground, which is barely do-able. My problem has been the total weight on goat-ground. And the areas that I or my clients have whacked goats has always been grass covered, in addition to typical goat cliffs. When the grass is wet from either rain or morning dew, them slopes get slick.
    (I do not do goats on ice.)

    A1- I too have rolled a goat or two down the slopes. My Barneys pack can take it. Weaker backpacks do not survive. (True story)

    I'm not saying YOU can not do it. But I prefer one dead goat per two backpacks.

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  6. #6
    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Default Can be done...

    I've done it...it is not fun. I'd pack a moose in the swamps anyday.

    Put 150# in your pack and walk down a few flights of stairs, then multiply X2 becasue of rough terrain to get the idea if youre comfortable to do it. Ditto what ATA said on slippery downhills with consequences at the bottom.

    I've packed out 4 goats, none of them fun, but it sure is alot nicer to have someone to split it with

    Good luck, Im in the same boat this year!!

  7. #7
    Member goaty's Avatar
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    Default Not me

    I've packed out 3 goats, and all were split between 2 guys, thank goodness. I would have died if they weren't, or just taken 2 trips. I know you're a big guy ( I work with your father in law) and think that you could probably do it. But like the others say, it really depends on the terrain and just how far you're packing.

  8. #8

    Default First goat

    I shot was with my partner. We shot big mature southeast billy's. We both shot them in October. It was raining and the hair was wet. We had both full hides and the meat. I was in great shape and it was an absolute CHORE to do it. We ended up snapping a rifle in half and got caught on the mountain in the dark. Big southeast goats are monsters to say the least. I was totally shocked on how big they are once on the ground. I would do it again, but would not like it at all. You will surely have 150# pack minimum with meat, full cape and horns.

    I did pack out a nanny and a small billy solo, so that can be done, but a mature billy is a "pack" full!

  9. #9
    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Default size of Goat

    Most of all it depends on the size of the Goat .... You did say 'full' cape.

    Some of the larger Billies we have taken were in excess of 300 lbs estimated live weight. With one that size there is no way ... just the meat is an overload ... and a wet rained on full body cape .. even with the skull and feet (down to the last toe bone) taken out and fleshed well ... also a very heavy load ...

    It's almost always better to have a packer or just plan on 2 loads out.

    The places (most Goat hunts) we hunt you would not want a broken or sprained knee or
    ankle. That action would absolutely ruin your day.

  10. #10
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Default

    it can be done, but ditto to the 150lbs give or take a big billy will kill you a small billy or decent nanny won't be as bad. Two guys is much nicer but if you don't mind crying alone in the shale slides, packin' a goat alone is a great way to go!
    lifesize billy hide...est 40-50lbs
    boned out meat decent billy....est 65-80lbs (there are big billies and monster billies and the difference in body size will amaze you)
    what ever spike camp you've got....est....40-50lbs
    equals 150lbs give some more than likely.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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  11. #11
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    Smile Packed 2

    I have packed 2, the first one was all by myself with all my gear, Man that was one heavy load, It hurt to walk for three days after. The second one was allot nicer 1 Goat for two packs made it allot more enjoyable. Both Goats were nice Billies, 9 1/4" and 10.5".

    MD

  12. #12
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    I took a young 9" male on the Kenai a few years ago. I got half way out of a 5 mile or so trek, and thought screw this. I stashed my gear in a tree, got the goat out of there and went to sleep. Next day sealed it, dropped at taxi, then drove back to get gear. It is espcially difficult packing that gear and animal when the ground/grass is wet, and goat hunting is usually a wet affair.

  13. #13

    Default 1 trip would not be smart solo.

    Taken several goats & in my opinion I think it would be very foolish to even try it unless 90% of your hike back is FLAT LEVEL ground. If someone has gear & takes a "muture BILLY goat" in true goat country I say no way! There is just to much weight in meat, entire hide, & gear. But I never been lucky enough to drop a goat less than a 1000' vertcile feet from a truck or plane. I am a big guy @ 6.6 220lbs & I do cardio several times a week. Make it easy on yourself & do it in two trips. Your knees will thank you & so will your loved ones.
    Goats can kill just as quick as any brown bear in a round about way. A majority of my walking the tight rope between life & dealth have been on goat hunts. I rather be charged by a brown bear w/ rifle in hand than out on some ledge praying that my foot hold is as good as I think it is.
    I did a bit of research & left the leg bones in on my 3rd goat just to see what they weighed. It was a 1 pound for each one basically. So I no longer bone out the legs in the field. Meat stays cleaner & easier to hang later. Two trips. Good luck & be safe.

  14. #14
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    Default depends on you...

    others have echo'd the same...but it really depends on you. I am not a big guy...5'9" and about 175...depending on dinner. I feel pretty capable in the mountains. I have packed out only 2 goats and 4 sheep but numerous moose hindquarters have been attached to my back. My last goat scored 51 B&C points and was, as BRWNBR put it, a big (but not monster) billy. I packed the entire hide (lifesized with skull and ankles attached) and all the meat (hinds were bone in, the rest was deboned) about 4 miles. The weight (my guess was 125lbs) was distributed quite well in my barneys pack, but most of the pack was either on level ground or downhill. I also had no spike camp as we hunted from the airplane. Bottom line, there are guys that can put my arse in the dirt, and there are guys whose arse I can put in the dirt...where you fall in the spectrum determines what you're capable of...happy hunting!

  15. #15
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    I had 95lbs of boneless meat from my Kodiak goat. I weighted it at Sea Hawks Air office and that was meat only. Once you add cape,horns,rifle,and camp you are asking for trouble if you pack it out in one trip. To me its not worth hurting yourself after a great sucessfull hunt. It would suck to end it by hurting yourself.

  16. #16
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Good topic

    I went into a hole to recover a Billy goat last year. It was a big goat and I carried out the hide and meat solo for only like 30 minutes. I was spent and glad to have my partner take his share of the load.

    They are indeed huge if you shoot a big billy. Like has already been mentioned......a young goat or nanny is different. Note, I didn't say easy!

    I'm also a load packer....6'2" with an athletic 230 pound athletic frame. I'll be going to the pool just as soon as I'm done with this email. I hit the weights in the winter and spring months and run the mountains up until hunting time. Why? Because I know the pain involved in getting into the backcountry for good animals and what it takes to carry em out.

    This year I'm going in with another person to target a billy. There will be frank discussion beforehand about only taking one.

    There is fun and successful hunting and there is painful and successful hunting. I like to have fun.

    Keep your legs healthy........build relationships with capable mountain hunters and work the give and take angle.

  17. #17
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    Default Idea...?

    Here's an option that hasn't been discussed, how about shuttling your loads? I've done it on a couple of sheep hunts and it has worked out well. My hunting partner and I are esentially physically equal- although he's 6'4" and 200 pounds- this is a key ingredient if you are going to shuttle loads. We only shuttle through steep terrain, and then we'll load ourselves down over any mild slopes or flat terrain. Our packs fully loaded last time weighed 152 and 154, a heavy load for sure, but broken in half it was much easier, and body preserving. We usually wouldn't go further than 2-3 miles between shuttles, and the walk back is always nice because it almost served as a recovery walk. If you shuttle you obviously need to plan on taking more time, but it is an option if both hunters take a Goat.

  18. #18
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    funny sockeye i was thinking the same thing but wasnt' in the mood to type a bunch of stuff...lol
    i've shuttled once i think and will do it again without a thought if i think i need to. But your right on, shuttle the tough stuff and sweat the easiER stuff. I've done it with clients and there packs, i'll run my up head come back and get theirs, they usually just drop it and keep on walking so i'm going back and forth past them with the packs while they trudge along....its a work out..but at least we get out!
    i'm 5'8 and 170lbs and can tote weight like i never dreamed before i started guiding...push your body a couple times and you'll realize what your really capabale of..ie can survive. Makes the next tough load not seem so bad.
    Bigger guys usually don't pack loads as well as smaller guys. center of gravity, muscle it takes to keep weight that much higher off the ground centered, bending forward takes more movement and more muslce to stop the movement...donkey and horse.... not always the case but the majority of the time.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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  19. #19
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    Being 6'4 218, gravity works against me. Luckily I'm bringin a tank on my goat hunt to help.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  20. #20
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Balance and coordination

    Ya, being a big mountain hunter is a disadvantage when the going is up with a load or not. I find though with strong shoulders and capable lower units I'm able to move rather quick down hill with a heavy load. It takes flexablity and speed though. I'm also already preparing for it because I realize being a large mountain hunter takes that much more energy and stamina to get-er-done.

    Will I hesitate to roll a big ol billy this year.........no way!! It's on and if I have to do it solo I will but I'm working on a group effort for moral, safety, and fun.

    Let us not forget the most powerful muscle........our brain. I really enjoyed the previous comments on the sheep gear thread about just learning to suffer.

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