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Thread: fogging issues...

  1. #1
    Member akula682's Avatar
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    Default fogging issues...

    when you are taking pics outside in the sub zero temps... how do you keep the condensation from forming/destroying your cameras when you bring them back inside?
    im talking digital, i have a Nikon D-100 (6MP), and a Kodak point and shoot Z1275 (12MP).
    Josh
    Back in Afghanistan, I hope for the last time.

  2. #2
    Member EricL's Avatar
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    I just drop them in a zip lock bag, suck all air out and seal it shut. Let them warm up and then remove. I believe this is what most guys do. I carry a coupld bags in my camera bag just for this reason.
    EricL

  3. #3
    Member AkSKeyMoe's Avatar
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    I used to use a gallon size ziploc bag too until I upgraded my DSLR body and lens. They're too big for a ziploc bag so I leave them in my camera bag until they have warmed up to room temps. No problems yet.

  4. #4
    Member Floyd_Davidson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akula682 View Post
    when you are taking pics outside in the sub zero temps... how do you keep the condensation from forming/destroying your cameras when you bring them back inside?
    im talking digital, i have a Nikon D-100 (6MP), and a Kodak point and shoot Z1275 (12MP).
    Put your camera into a plastic bag (ziplocks work, but the carryout bags from a grocery store are even better and ubiquitous, and kitchen sized trash bags are no doubt the "best"), and then bring it inside and let it warm to at least several degrees above freezing before taking it out of the bag. The bag does not have to be air tight, but it does help to squeeze all the air out, and there must be no significant exchange of air between the inside and outside of the bag (which usually means it should not be handled or moved, but should be placed somewhere relatively warm and be left alone).

    The reason things get fogged up, or even have water droplets dripping on them when going from a cold environment into a warmer one is related to how air holds more moisture at higher temperatures. The warmer the air, the more water vapor it can aborb. But if warm air with lots of moisture is cooled, the moisture condenses out. That is how clouds in the sky are formed, but it is also the reason eyeglasses, camera lenses, and
    a variety of other things get fogged.

    If your house is a nice 70 degrees the air in it can hold a lot of moisture. But when a camera that is at 10F is brought inside, the warm moist air that touches the camera is cooled by something close to 60 degrees! That cooled air can no longer hold all the moisture in it, and as the water condenses it is deposited on the camera.

    If the camera is put into a plastic bag while it warms up, the effect is to keep the warm moist air separated from the camera. The air inside the bag was initially cold too, so it has very little moisture, but the problem is that air is a good insulator and if the bag is full of air the camera will take longer to get warm. Not always a big deal, but to avoid a longer wait, squeeze the air out.

    Ziplock bags are nice for holding small items (lenses and such) in a camera bag. But the wide opening means that if it isn't sealed there might be an exchange of inside air with outside air, which would not be good. More flimsy bags, such as the carry out bags from grocery stores, are nice because they are just large enough to hold a DSLR, and can be "wrapped tight" to exclude air and promote the fastest warming. A "kitchen" sized trash bag is great for much the same reasons, plus it is so large that if you suddenly realize the memory card with all the pictures on it is still in the camera... you don't need to wait for it to warm up to get it! Just reach all the way in and extract it without allowing any massive amount of warm air into the bag!

  5. #5
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    Same thing happens in warm, muggy climates after exiting air conditioned buildings. The relatively cool camera hits the warm moist air and fogs up. I'm guessing this has never happened in AK.

  6. #6
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    Default What is Air Conditioning?

    is that like a shampoo or something??? :P

  7. #7
    Member akula682's Avatar
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    Thanks everyone, I never thought of the bag trick that would have saved me lots of trouble when I was using my old Nikon F3.
    Josh
    Back in Afghanistan, I hope for the last time.

  8. #8
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    I haven't had much trouble with my camera and cold weather, but when very cold out I shoot a few photos and then get back in my truck to warm up. The air is so dry that no condensation forms on the camera inside the truck, and it's the same when by the time I bring it inside my home.

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