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Thread: Sheep Hunting optics

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    Default Sheep Hunting optics

    I will be carrying a new spotting Scope, That much I know. I also want to carry a set of binoculars for easier viewing at closer ranges. What would be a good size of binocular to carry ? I am considering a 10 X 42.. Would this be too small ?

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    Default 10 x 42's

    10 x 42's will be just fine as long as you have a good quality spotting scope.
    Marc Theiler

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    Quote Originally Posted by jebrmk View Post
    I will be carrying a new spotting Scope, That much I know. I also want to carry a set of binoculars for easier viewing at closer ranges. What would be a good size of binocular to carry ? I am considering a 10 X 42.. Would this be too small ?
    This is kind of a can of worms in a way. Sure 10X42s can be great, however the quality of the optics often play a much larger role in how well a particular pair of binos will work for you. I have 10X42 Swarovskis, but they are pretty darn heavy and have decided to talk my wife's Minox 10X43s to save weight. Anyways, if you are looking for certain optics to buy a price range would be helpful. Most here LOVE to help others spend their hard earned cash.

    If you could proved a little more info on what you are looking for price/weight wise, we'd be better able to assist ya in some options.

    This thread would be a good place to get ya started.

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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jebrmk View Post
    I will be carrying a new spotting Scope, That much I know. I also want to carry a set of binoculars for easier viewing at closer ranges. What would be a good size of binocular to carry ? I am considering a 10 X 42.. Would this be too small ?
    i use 7X30 swarovski's and am very happy with them. because of the clarity factor, they define Much better than 10X's that are lesser quality, and they are light.

    they won't substitute for your spotter though......i use a 25X leupold for that.

    happy trails.
    jh
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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Money and optics go together.
    best budget bino's Nikon Monarch 10x42 Clarity far exceeds cost implication
    Best mid-level Minox 10x42 HG Great glass and extremely light weight
    for size
    Best mid-level Vortex Razor 10x42 great clarity on par with minox but heavier


    High end... Leica, Zeiss, Swarovski....choose your poison!

    Don't be fooled by the Steiner marketing, many a hunt has been tainted by their failures!

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    Lujon is right - money and optics do go together. Conventional wisdom says to buy the best possible optics that you can afford. You DO get what you pay for, especially in this arena. I have rarely known anyone who purchased high-end quality (Swaroski, Zeiss, Leica) that was dissappointed with the performance. However, I also know a fair number of outdoorsman who use the mid-quality (Nikon, Minox, Leupold etc) that are quite satisfied with their experience. Stay away from the cheap stuff. You will NOT be satisfied, and will have to then re-buy the mid-level or high-end gear anyway.
    The two practically useful numbers in a binocular (any optics for that matter) are magnification and objective lens. For instance, a pair of 8x40 binoculars have 8x the magnification with an objective lens of 40mm. The value of the magnifcation is self-explanatory. The value of the objective lens number is in ratio to the magnification. In this case 40/8 = 5. That is the magic number for potential light transmission through the piece of optical equipment - five. Any ratio number over that contributes nothing. Yet a number slightly lower is acceptable - four (10x40 or 8x32). That is why you will notice almost all binoculars regardless of brand have approximately a four or five ratio. A ratio of five sets the stage for better light transmission than a four in low light conditions such as early morning and late evening. However, this light transmission (and thus clarity) is ultimately dependent on the "quality of the glass"/ the high-end vs mid-level vs cheap. A pair of 8x30 Swaroskis will transmit far more light and thus be much clearer than pair of 10x50 Bushnells. Much of the price difference has to do with the number of lenses coated, the times each lens is coated, and the type of coating itself etc.
    Something else to consider when purchasing binoculars is how YOU will use them. The 10x versions have more magnifcation but are heavier and harder to hold still for prolonged periods of glassing. The 7/8x versions have less magnification but are lighter and easier to handle. Apply that to how you will use them to find which is better suited to your needs.
    Spotting scopes are somewhat uniform in magnification/objective lens. The real consideration is variable power vs. fixed and, of course, "quality of glass". Nearly all believe that variable is preferred because you can use a lower power when scanning and a higher power when fixated on a particular object of interest. The same argument for spending as much as you can possibly afford applies to spotting scopes as it does to binoculars.
    I won't tell you (unless you want me to with a pm) which brands I use because I do not want to "taint" your research and discovery. But my binoculars and spotting scope are my favorite pieces of hunting equipment that I own. Hope this helps you and good luck finding what is RIGHT FOR YOU.

  7. #7

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    This year I am running with my spotter and a pair of compact 9x28's that are a pound lighter than my full size 8x43 glass. Just dont spend much time looking at sheep through binos. White dots are pretty easy to see, and once spotted, the rest of the time your looking through a spotter.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jebrmk View Post
    I will be carrying a new spotting Scope, That much I know. I also want to carry a set of binoculars for easier viewing at closer ranges. What would be a good size of binocular to carry ? I am considering a 10 X 42.. Would this be too small ?
    No it's not that small, what important is your comfort using your new spotting scope you use for Hunting Optics

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    Member GDinAK's Avatar
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    10x42 are just about perfect to me, I have tried almost every combination in order to reduce weight and ultimately have decided to return full circle and stick with the 10x42. I recently sold a pair of 8x32s, and a pair of swaro 10x25 and some other gear so that i could afford to upgraded to Swaro EL Swarovision and WOW wish I would have done it ten years ago. Albinos.com has some great rankings and I almost went with the Vortex Viper HD because of the great ratings, reviews, weight, and it is under $600. Best of luck...

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    I use minox 8.5x43 HG's for all my hunting including sheep, I think they are an incredible value for the performance and weight. I used a pair of 10x42 Baush&lomb Discoverers for 6 years before I got the minox and I find the minox to be much lighter and a much sharper/clearer image. I have used a pair of leica along beside the minox and although they may have been better in some conditions(not the conditions I compared in) it certainly isnt comparable to the price difference. The first thing I did with mine was put Butler creek covers on the objectives and after 4-5 years of tough use, the lenses are still like new. I paid approx $700, I saw them at cameralandny recently for $450. Thats a hell of a deal.
    Spotting scopes are invaluable in the mountains but in my experience you will be spending a lot more of your time behind the binos, so get the best value for whatever the dollars you can afford. Once you get into the mid level stuff like the minox HG's and others, you've already taken a huge jump in quality over the cheap stuff and your eyes will feel it(or I should say wont feel it). But once you get above that level the performance jumps dont reflect the price jumps. JMHO.

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    Quote Originally Posted by theilercabin View Post
    10 x 42's will be just fine as long as you have a good quality spotting scope.
    10X42's..most Alaskan hunting guides cant be wrong

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