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Thread: Making a case for Wildcats...

  1. #1
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    Default Making a case for Wildcats...

    Here's a shot of the case forming operations for the 358 Nukalpiaq. (I got my picture, clicker, poster fixed)

    From the left.
    The basic 375 Ruger brass (cylindrical).
    The same case after a trip through the 404 Jeffery sizer as form die #1.
    Then through the 358 NUK. body die for form die #2.
    The finished and trimmed case.
    The unfired 375 Ruger standard brass. Note the shorter neck.
    Loaded 358 NUK with 275 grain Kodiak.
    Loaded round with 280 Swift A-frame.
    (The lense makes them look uneven but are identical formed cases.)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSCN0923.jpg  
    Last edited by Murphy; 02-13-2009 at 15:52.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  2. #2

    Default Beauty!

    Now that's a good looking round! Beltless or not, and without scale, it really reminds me of the 358 Norma mag.

    Are you using the 404 die mostly as an intermediate step in neck forming?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Now that's a good looking round! Beltless or not, and without scale, it really reminds me of the 358 Norma mag.

    Are you using the 404 die mostly as an intermediate step in neck forming?
    Yes. The 404 also has that shallow shoulder that is so easy to form and I needed something in between the 470 caliber cylindrical basic brass and the 35 caliber so that die was a good choice for both. We can't form straight brass into a 30 degree shoulder without collapse and the Jeffery gave me a nice gentle angle to start with. I adjusted the Jeffery die to stop the shoulder at the point of the finished shoulder and it works like a champ.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Default

    Very nice. Some questions if you don't mind. I have never done any wildcatting but have done some reading and would like to learn more.

    1. Is there any advantage to starting with basic brass over 375 Rugar brass? It would seem just as easy either way.

    2. Do these then need to be neck reamed? I would imagine it would be posible to designed the reamer for a large enough neck thickness to make this unnecessary.

    3. Do these then get annealed to prevent neck splits?

    4. Do the necks come out at even thickness? Reducing size this much I would imagine any original variation in the brass would be increased.

    I know some of these questions maybe stupid. I hope to someday get a lathe and do a little wildcatting making my own reamers. I can't afford a lathe now or spot to put it, so I am learning all I can about the details.

    Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by bandhmo View Post
    Very nice. Some questions if you don't mind. I have never done any wildcatting but have done some reading and would like to learn more.

    1. Is there any advantage to starting with basic brass over 375 Rugar brass? It would seem just as easy either way.

    2. Do these then need to be neck reamed? I would imagine it would be posible to designed the reamer for a large enough neck thickness to make this unnecessary.

    3. Do these then get annealed to prevent neck splits?

    4. Do the necks come out at even thickness? Reducing size this much I would imagine any original variation in the brass would be increased.

    I know some of these questions maybe stupid. I hope to someday get a lathe and do a little wildcatting making my own reamers. I can't afford a lathe now or spot to put it, so I am learning all I can about the details.

    Thanks
    Not stupid at all, actually very good, advanced case forming questions.

    1&2. Well, for this one yes. If I was just necking the 375 to 358 with no other changes, the 375 Ruger case would be better and generally would not be too thick for a normal chamber neck dimensions. I am setting the shoulde rback and the part of the 375 case that was the shoulder is now the neck and it does leave a thick donut in the neck. I make the necking down with the body die which leaves the case at about .360" inside, too loose for a bullet but when I push a bullet into the case I can feel this donut. I then use the case neck reamer which is .3605" andthis cuts out the donut. We normally use the neck reamer after the case is fired and that will give the correct thickness for a case fired in a normal 358 chamber and leave normal brass thickness for correct bullet grip. My chamber neck is .389" and as long as brass isn't any thicker than .014" we have enough room to allow the bullet to exit freely. (.358" + .014" +.014" = .386" ) As long as we have .002" to .004" of space we are good to go. We do have to watch these dimension and consider all aspects of it when we make a new wildcat. There is no donut with the new cylindrical basic brass.

    3. Annealing should be done before any forming takes place and it may or may not be necessary. I found after annealling that cases were too soft to form that 30 degree shoulder and after loosing a few cases because they were too soft, I stopped. The 404 Jeffery die is a big help for this because it starts a very gentle shoulder to further push back into the correct shape.

    4. The brass thickness is a very uniform .012" to .013" all the way around. I do run the reamer through the neck after firing the formed cases and it cuts very little out but does assure I have the right thickness.

    All these things are important and should be considered. Also some case forming just require more work and we need to be willing and able to do the extra. After a quantity or 100 or so cases is made they will last for many firings and we learn to appreciate every one of them. Some times the forming job is very easy and for the record necking up always preferred and about 10 to 20% is the very easy and nets good results. Necking down about 10% is also an easy job. I just design the reamers and leave the making to Dave Manson. I always get a good one that way.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Default

    What lube do you use?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wildalaska View Post
    What lube do you use?
    Imperial Sizing Die Wax...only and always.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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