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Thread: What is your favorite tomato to grow??

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    Member grcg's Avatar
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    Default What is your favorite tomato to grow??

    And more specifically, is it determinate (bush type) or indeterminate (vine type).

    There are so many interesting ones to try, and I always have such a hard time deciding.

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    Member upinak's Avatar
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    I noticed that I grow cherry tom's the best. For whatever reason they get HUGE when i grow them (as in 3 foot or taller bush) and when I am doing it right, they bloom out to awesome little cherries.

    I am wanting to try roma's this year. But I had the best luck when a co-worker gave me a hybred he made of a cherry and a siberian. They were great, and I wish I could find him to buy some seeds off of him.
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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    I like the red ones.



    Try out Denali Seed's hybrids; Polar Beauty, Polar Star, and Sub-Arctic 25. They generally need to be started indoors by the beginning of March depending on your particular growing situation, but they do very well in our cold climate.
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    Member upinak's Avatar
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    Joat where can you get them?


    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    I like the red ones.



    Try out Denali Seed's hybrids; Polar Beauty, Polar Star, and Sub-Arctic 25. They generally need to be started indoors by the beginning of March depending on your particular growing situation, but they do very well in our cold climate.
    No amount of education can help those who want to remain permanently ignorant of facts, which includes those whom have been educated.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Denali Seeds are stocked at many places. I've seen them in Carrs/Safeway, Fred Meyer, Home Depot, Lowes, and at all the local greenhouses and hardware stores.

    I see from their website that they don't sell direct retail, but it looks like they list a few stores that will sell retail by mail order...

    http://www.denaliseed.com/main.html
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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Exclamation territorial or johnny's

    are much better seeds than denali, imhp.
    territorial's "beaver lodge" are a determinate "ultra-early" (55 days) very productive and ummm-ummmmm good.
    we have had pretty crummy germination rates with denali compared to johnny's, but hey, some folks swear by them....
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    Default Toms

    For Cherry Toms, I've never had a bad crop with sweet million cheryy toms. Nice size, great flavor and abundant crops. They are an improved sweet 100. A good two inch diameter Tom is a Stupice. Short season and great flavor and just keeps pumping out the toms. I'm trying a couple of the Russian toms this year including a black tom and the Koralik. Gonna have to try those Beaverlodges Dave! I need to find an earlier slicer. The Oregon Spring is a good Tom, but needs a longer growing season than I like.

    I agree with Dave on Territorial Seed Co. They have a great selection and I've never had a germination issue with their seeds. They also have the best early, short season, cold tolerant corn I've ever found. It's called Precocious. Great flavor

  8. #8
    Member grcg's Avatar
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    Default Cherry tomatoes, slicers and saucers

    Hi again,

    Yeah, I would have to concur with you on the cherry tomatoes. It seems like no matter what happens, they will produce and taste good. I too have had good luck with the sweet millions. My Mom and I have been buying this little cherry tomato - I think it is called tiny tim. Only gets maybe a foot high. Growing on our porches, it is a pretty plant and reasonably prolific.

    I have tried the Stupice, and really didn't like the taste I got...but a lot of people swear by them.

    I am going to take a look at those BeaverLodge and Precocious seeds.

    I'd love to hear more tomato preferences and whys!
    Last edited by grcg; 02-17-2009 at 14:16. Reason: ...spelling...

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    Member barleydog's Avatar
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    Early Girl or Boy (I believe?) was the only good plant in last years cold wet summer. Yellow plum did alright too.

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    Talking Sweet million...

    I planted one called sweet million, and it was a yellow tomato and think it may have produced over the million mark.Unreal.GR

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    Default gardning

    i like sweet chelsia cherry & earlie girl always does well

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    Angry Early Girls...

    I'm beginning to think it's my supplier, but every time I plant EG's I get blossom end rot.The local university says it's cause is too much calcium.I have lots in my water, so I actually switched to creek water and have had the same problem.I was going to order some of those Beaver lodge you folks spoke of, but seeds were $3.50, and shipping was $7.50 .Maybe the pres will send me a stimulus package?GR

  13. #13
    Member grcg's Avatar
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    Default Blossom End Rot

    I had heard you get blossom end rot from too little calcium. I tried putting eggshells and extra calcium in the soil....but the thing that worked for me is some calcium solution in a spray bottle from the gardening store. Spraying it on them a couple of times a week after it starts producing tomatoes worked like a charm!! Now I just have to figure out how to make the solution myself!!

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    1.) Starfire (nolonger bred commercially for seed, as far as I know) :^(

    so, in place of the starfire, when I can't find older fertile seed-stock of the starfires,

    2.) Oregon Spring

    and for a cherry tomato....

    1.) Golden Pear

    I don't usually do beef-steaks of any kind, and can often get impressive production from determinate bushes without the hassles of vining monsters.

    ruffle

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    Dolomite lime, Alaska white fish bone meal, crab meal, steamed bone meal, etc. will help to prevent bloom end rot. The trick with organics is to get them into the soil in time for them to be releasing sufficiently BEFORE your maters are fruiting.

    Also, if using dolomite lime, though it's more timid/gentle in nature than hydrated limes, or blended limes like 'Super Sweet,' it can still raise your ph too high, or alkaline, for the liking of most tomatoes.

    My maters thrive quite well at about a 6.3-6.5 ph; just somewhat acidic.

    ruffle

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