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Thread: Building a dock

  1. #1

    Default Building a dock

    I need to build a small dock down on the Kenai

    maybe 16' out which may include an 8x8 section L'd at the end

    I'm kicking around between a floating dock or a pipe dock

    another guy on my lake built a pipe dock and sank the pipes by using a hose and the water augered down and he just worked the pipes in

    I neglected to ask him how deep he sank them in

    can anyone else share their dock building ideas/lessons learned/etc?

    Thanks!!

    P.S. not sure if this is the right place for this thread ????

  2. #2
    Member ret25yo's Avatar
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    Default

    great question .. also interested

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  3. #3
    Moderator Adison's Avatar
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    Default Did someone say dock's?

    I had my own company building boatdocks for a living down in Texas for awhile. If you want, you can call me and we can talk about what you are wanting to do, or just give me somemore info on your site and I will try to give you some advice. My cell is 360-5832 and I am in Anchorage.
    First, what kind of bottom is in your pond, rocky or mud? Second, How much does the water level fluctuate? Third, are you gonna use it for fishing/swimming or just for docking a boat? and Last, how steep is the grade from the shoreline out into the lake/ (does it drop off right away or stay shallow for a longway out?) I will be glad to help out any way I can.
    Adison
    I carry a gun because a cop is too heavy!
    Anything worth shooting is worth shooting twice, remember life is expensive and ammo is cheep!

  4. #4

    Default What worked for me - and didn't!

    I first build a dock at our lake place several years ago. I used oilfield tubing and attempted to drive it into the muck with a sledge. Our lake has a good gravel bottom but you have to get below the mud level to get there and using the method I did, I probably just landed on top of the gravel. I then used large U bolts to secure the rim joists to the pilings and then decked it.

    This sort of worked and we used it for several years but I just replaced it last year. Not driving the pilings down into the gravel resulted in a noticable sway when you walked on it. The tubing I used was so hard that the U bolts couldn't really bite and they tended to slip so every year I was trying to lift the whole thing up and re-tighten it.

    When I decided to replace it, I used a professional with a tracked pile driver to drive the piles in before the ice went out. We used treated lumber for the joists and Trex for the decking. It looks good and is hell for stout so I am happy but it was pricey.

    There is probably a good way to work your pilings to a sufficient depth by hand but hiring someone to drive them in may be a wise investment. By the time you deck it, you have a fairly good investment into it and having a shaky foundation is no good over the long term.

    Now that I have it extending +/- 16' into the lake, I figure it will be easy to add floating sections at the end once I figure out how to get those at a reasonable cost!

    Good luck.

  5. #5
    Member Queen of Kings's Avatar
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    Default What I did

    I had 2 each 3" pipe pile driven into the ground approx. 16-20 feet. A company in big lake did this in the winter. I assembled a floating dock using
    http://www.shoremaster.com/docks/floating/main.html I go out 30' and have a 12' x 10' dock. it has all worked great. Now I have a few neighbors that have all kinds of problems, mostly because they did not drive there post deep enough to get down to support. they lift, and fall and are never straight.
    2003 220 Hewescraft Sea Runner 115 Yam'y, Soft Top "Schmidt Happens"

  6. #6

    Thumbs up ShoreMaster Floating docks

    Hello
    My company handles the ShoreMaster products for the state of Alaska. Our Floating Poly Dock is by far the most popular dock system we sell. With the glacial lakes we have up here and the varied bottom conditions these docks work well in all freshwater enviroments.

    Depending on the size of your dock and the condition of the lake bottom, we have several options for securing the floating docks. You do NOT need to have driven pile to support or secure these docks in typical residential or recreational settings. Most installations utilize a 2" galv pipe set 1'-3' in the lake bottom depending on soil conditions. These pipes are doing nothing more than providing lateral stability to the dock which is fully supported by it's own floatation. Most docks are owner installed, but installation is available. Feel free to contact me for more info and a list of references. Also I will include a link to a slide show on youtube of my display at the recent Anchors Aweigh Boat Show.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sqyGC5um5F8

    Tom Vitt
    907-352-6336
    Wasilla, Ak.

  7. #7
    Member anonymous1's Avatar
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    Default HDPE pipe floats

    We put in a new floating dock made from welded HDP pipe (high density poly) filled with foam. I was sceptical at first. We got the poly float frames from an outfit in B.C. and added the stringers and decking our selves. It turned out to be a amazingly tough and somewhat flexable.
    I think you can get the poly pipe in Anc. and rent the fusion welding machine to weld on end caps.
    Ours has 3 12" dia float pipes and is 8' wide with 6"x6" stringers and 2"12" decking connected with hinges off the ends of the 6x6`s
    Its like this but a different outfit.
    http://alphamariner.com/alpha_mariner_hdpe_docks.htm

  8. #8
    Member AK LIVIN's Avatar
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    Default anchor versis posts question

    We need to build a dock although our lake bottom is rocky not the typical AK muc. Has anyone utilized an anchor system rahter than steel or galvinized posts?

  9. #9

    Default Floating Docks

    People utilize "deadmen" or anchors quite frequently. I have two options for "deadmen" that you can use with the ShoreMaster docks.

    Tom
    352-6336

  10. #10
    Member markopolo50's Avatar
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    Default Dock

    Quote Originally Posted by Broken Motor View Post
    I need to build a small dock down on the Kenai

    maybe 16' out which may include an 8x8 section L'd at the end

    I'm kicking around between a floating dock or a pipe dock

    another guy on my lake built a pipe dock and sank the pipes by using a hose and the water augered down and he just worked the pipes in

    I neglected to ask him how deep he sank them in

    can anyone else share their dock building ideas/lessons learned/etc?

    Thanks!!

    P.S. not sure if this is the right place for this thread ????
    BM, does the guy leave the posts in all year? I have augers on the bottom of my posts and we have to remove them in the fall as the ice will wreak the posts in the spring as the ice starts to move. Maybe you don't have the ice problems we have. Just wondering, thanks, Mark

  11. #11

    Default

    he leaves those pipes in

    but I don't think there's a lot of ice MOVEment problems

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