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Thread: new to goat hunting

  1. #1
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    Default new to goat hunting

    Hi, I just got a goat permit, I am thinking of using my 388 and loading with Nosler Accubond bullets, I have no experience with these bullets and how they work on tough animals. Anyone have any insight or experience with these bullets. Thanks for any help

  2. #2
    Member Roger45's Avatar
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    210 grain Nosler partition works great on goat. I mainly use hand loads, but I have found that the Federal Premium Safari loads work quite well with my Stainless Stalker from Browning.
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

  3. #3
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    Hey thanks for the info, I also hand load so will be trying to work up a load for this hunt.

  4. #4
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    my .338 has taken two goats, one for me and one for my wife. both were one shot kills with nosler 210 federal premiums
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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  5. #5

    Default

    Have shot 22 goats, most with the .338 Win. Mag. because that was all I had. It worked fine; However if I was to have a choice now, I would choose something with less recoil, many times you are shooting in aweful positions, like the toe of your left boot only on the ground, and your right leg hooked over something, a rock or a small stunted hemlock. One time I had to use my pants belt looped over a rock and hold the fore end and the belt with my left hand, knowing that when I fired I would fall six or eight feet.
    Goats are very thin animal after the coat is removed. Early on I would shoot them several times, and I could see where they were hit perfect, but they just stood there for 40 or 60 seconds. I shot one early on three times, with the .338 and all three shots were in a 4" group. I soon learned to just shoot and wait.
    I think we could shoot two goats per year back then. Mostly I shot goats in the dead of winter, as that way I slid them right down to the car. Learned that they slid better just the way they fall, then I would process them just off the road.

  6. #6
    Member AK-HUNT's Avatar
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    Default fine

    That setup will be fine. Partitions are my favorite but any quality bonded bullet (like you have) will work and the 338 is a good goat caliber. Especially if you have to drop it where it stands. Sometimes even the 338 wont do it as quick as you want. They are TOUGH. Pound for pound the toughest in my opinion.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for all the input, I have killed lots of other alaskan animals, but not a goat yet. Its great to hear other peoples experiences, hopefully I'll have some pictures to share this fall.

  8. #8
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    Default Wow 22 goats.

    I am new to Alaska and Goat Hunting. I also got a tag,for DG336 and was wondering about access. I lived in Montana all my life and tried for 25 years to get a goat tag with no luck. I have hunted alot and know my way around Montana but Alaska is a different bird. Any hints or tips about access in this area would be welcome. Thanks in advance.......

  9. #9

    Default Tough as Nails!

    Goats are tough as nails, so whatever you shoot make the first shot count. If you are not sure of the shot do not take it. This past year my buddy shot his goat five times in the boiler room with a .30 378 Whetherby mag and 180 Barnes x bullets and the shots were at about 375 yards. Now I am not a fan of the X bullet because I do not think that you get full energy transfer on a solid copper hollow point, but for penetration I do not think they can be beat.

    My Goat in 2006 took two 200 grain Speers to stop him out of a 300 win mag at 147 yards and I hit him solid the first shot on the right front shoulder and the next shot anchored him about 2 seconds latter threw the top of the spine between the shoulders. He went about twenty feet and I was lucky, because had he gone another forty he would have bailed of a 500 foot cliff.

    Congrats on the permit, have fun and be safe….Big
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  10. #10

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    Which cailber would you choose between these 2 which are both model 70's. 270 win or 375 H&H and both are very accurate with the Nosler Partitons. I shoot 150's in the 270 and 300's in the 375, 270 is probably a couple of lbs lighter than the 375. I want to knock that goat down with the first shot if at all possible. I'm hunting DG342.

  11. #11
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Hopeak is right on. if you can nail one and wait, it'll die. but they don't like to stop from bullets, they do, they aren't bulletproof but sometimes a bit stubborn. If he's in a good area and you can shoot and let him walk a bit, let him. But if he's in a iffy area with lots of "spat factor" country, hit him till he drops, Sometimes high shoulder will put them over. I shot a big nanny this last oct with a .338, not sure what loads and the goat just flattened. one shot, echo died and so was the goat. Its all placement as we all know. but to answer your question your gun and load and bullet are all fine. Goats are tough as in bullets don't go in them, they are just tough as in they sometimes dont' want to fall over.
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  12. #12
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    akhunter, shoot the .375 with a core-lokt bullet, forget a controlled exspansion, if you want to knock it down go something really soft and heavy, be like getting hit with a potato... hit it solid in the shoulder, maybe higher in the shoulder and theres a really good chance it'll go right now.
    the .270 if you break something it'll go down but if you just sing it thru, you may here a small chuckle....
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  13. #13

    Thumbs up Thanks Jake

    Yeah, that's what I figured but I had to ask. She's a heavy rifle but I think your right in that taking the 375 is the right move to make. Wha do you recommend for a good bullet that will expand and is accurate? I do not reload so it will have to be factory.

  14. #14
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    theres some green box rem that loads the soft points or core-lokt those will be perfect for what your doing.
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  15. #15

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    Cool, I've got a green box of Remingtons which I think are 270gr Core-Lokts, looks like I'm all set.

  16. #16
    Member Formerly Montana Bob's Avatar
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    Default Amazing

    I too drew a Kodiak Goat tag and was wondering if my 300 Ultra shooting 200gr A Frames would be along the lines of what would be good for Goat. It appears it will fit in fine.
    On another note, I got to say this has got to be the best site for information on Alaska hunting and fishing in exsitence.
    I came here to do research on an area to hunt Goat. Before I Applied I already new who did fly in's to the area. What to expect for weather, when was the best time of the season to hunt, what kind of gear is needed and so much more info by just doing my research here and listening and reading from to what others have to say..
    Also looks like I picked up a partner who posted here and who drew a tag for the same area and will be driving and flying in together.
    So Kudo's goes out The Alaska Outdoors Directory.
    Fish IT! Hunt IT! or *#%@ IT!

  17. #17
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Lots of guys drew the Kodiak goat permits this year from this forum. Lots of goats down there. And bears.

  18. #18

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    Anyone have info on hunting twentymile for goats. looks like some ruff country.

  19. #19
    Member 454casull's Avatar
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    Talking Hornady Interlock

    I have got full penetration through a goat almost lengthwise (quartering to) with a 225 Hornady Interlock handload out of my .338 Win. Mag. Definately not a premium bullet but I sure have had good luck with these in different calibers on bears, sheep, and goats.

  20. #20
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    hmmm I was set on using 200grn Accubonds out of my 325WSM but perhaps I should be looking at the 180grn silver tips.... I don't see the bennefit of using a big 220 round nose since it will limit my range somewhat. Are they ever going to make a new factory load for my rifle!!

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