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Thread: Yet another Brass Question with a Twist

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    Default Yet another Brass Question with a Twist

    Okay I know it has been asked to death, but I have a new twist on the Question. What brass is best from an Economic perspective.

    It seems that many feel that Norma and Lapua is considered some of the best, while Federal is considered some of the worst with Winchester and Remington somewhere in between. Now if loading for top accuracy cost is of little object, but for general hunting and target use how much does this matter especially when considering cost of brass. Can I load Norma or Lapua brass longer with out problems? Long enough to justifiy the increase in price? With fewer problems?

    The reason for my Question is that I have been loading my 30-06 using Federal brass, reused from factory rounds. So far I have been happy, but am now thinking of getting some more brass unloaded. I am not against spending a little extra money but would like to know what I am getting for it. Since I got my Federal brass for what I considered zero cost and know of no way to determine a price I have left it out.

    Using the 30-06 as an example brass cost per one web page are:

    Lapua: $1.07
    Norma: $0.78
    Hornady: $0.64
    Remington: $0.39
    Winchester: $0.38

    So my thought is this: Provided I don't have other problems I would like to get the most bang for my buck. By my figuring if I can load Remington or Winchester brass say 5 times without neck splits or annelling can I then load Lapua brass 14 times, to makeup for the cost difference? Suppose I anneal the necks on the Winchester or Remington brass every 3 loads and get say 10 loads, could I expect to get 28 loads from Lapua annealing in the same way? Both 14 and 28 loads sounds like a lot to me and is likely not reasonable, so I assume there is something else that is used to justify use of the more expenceive brass?

    Sorry for the long post.

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    I like Winchester myself. I have heard that Norma is thicker in the base, hold less powder, and tend not to last as well as the thinner brass. I have no direct knowledge one way or another thatís itís just what I have always heard. They would need to last a very long time to make up for the price as you post them and I donít buy that any brass is that much better than another.
    Andy

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    Some folks don't like Norma but rationalize about the sour grapes. I have never found a problem with the quality or durability of any Norma brass. But comparing it weight wise with Winchester it weighs almost the same in the two calibers I have in both brands, which means they are about the same thinkness. The price on the other hand, is too much. For the 30-06 as an example, and several others as well, the Winchester is the best bang for the buck. You should check your prices for Winchester again that seems an old price. I buy Norma for those calibers that no other brass is made and for some of the specialty brass but the best brass available is Lapua, here again the price scares us off. I got some real buys on Lapua made '06 brass a while back for $30/100 it was headstamped 30-06 100yrs and DA for Dakota Arms. Dakota has Lapua make a lot of brass for them and this was for their 100th anniversary of the '06, yadayada. But I got a bargain.

    I think Federal is the worst brass on the planet for rifle and will not use it and don't think much of Remington for most calibers. I use a lot of Winchester brass and it is about as good as we need. I also have been using a lot of Hornady brass and it was available when no other brand was. It is very good. Overloading the case will shorten the life of any of them. Buy good brass and take care of it.
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    Back about 1995 I ordered 1000 rounds ofArgentina surplus 7.62 NATO ammo. It was stamped 7.62N Lapua so I figured at $120 or so it was a great deal just for the brass. When I got it and looked at it I packed it up and returned the junk. It looked like new ammo but the brass was all pitted at the base and looked like cold casting. Had to be a third world Lapua knock off, some grade ďAĒ junk that I would never put in my gun. So as always, look out for knock offs if buying the high end names.

    Andy

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    Thanks for the replies, I would not be against spending more for brass if I would get the value from the additional cost. However, it sounds like for me Winchester Brass is the way to go.

    Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bandhmo View Post
    Okay I know it has been asked to death, but I have a new twist on the Question. What brass is best from an Economic perspective.
    Sorry for the long post.
    1. If that was a long post, then the reader(s) aren't intelligent enough to think about two paragraphs, hence they shouldn't be on this site.

    2. From a strictly economic perspective, DO NOT get into the idea of shooting constant max pressure loads. Go over to www.accuratereloading.com and look at the reloading tables, you can see the best groups almost always are at beginning load levels. Keep the pressures down, so there should be no reason you cannot get 10 or more loadings out of a case. You have to anneal once every 3-4 shots, but that is easy anyways. Oh, don't bother with full-length resizing unless the cartridge needs it; just go for a neck sizer.

    3. Whenever I can find it, I will buy and use Winchester brass. I just like it.
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  7. #7

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    The rifle/chamber can effect the longevity of the brass as much as the number of times it's reloadable. Some chambers are larger than others some are tighter than others. Military rifles tend to have looser chambers to deal with grit and foriegn bodies, these work the brass harder. Target rifles tend to have tighter chambers and allow less brass deformation when fired. As you can see these factors can effect brass life, just the amount of repeated work they have to do.
    But 30-06 brass is very common. So the need to buy the specialty brass lines isn't there. Just try to buy the brass you intend to load as a lot, Brass can vary from lot to lot.
    Also remember that since you've worked up your present loads with Federal Brass that your new brass my produce more/less pressure with your pet load.
    Best of Luck !!
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