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Thread: My Gear so far.

  1. #1
    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Default My Gear so far.

    I have just started putting my pack together for hiking/camping or whatever. So far this is what I have...
    My mini survival kit that I will keep on me.

    My pack with tent and sleeping bag

    Knives, flashlights and first aid kit

    Layered clothing and food

    Still adding to it but it's a start.

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Also have my Sig Sauer .40 S&W with extra ammo

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    Member upinak's Avatar
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    Hmm military poly pro. Get rid of it and get something more stable. The poly pro also smell.. bad.

    Take it from an ex-military wife, the stuff never gets really clean and the smell stays forever. Look at what other have for clothing gear as well. You can find deals, depending on your size.

    Also.. get a 30.06, you will never regret it.
    No amount of education can help those who want to remain permanently ignorant of facts, which includes those whom have been educated.

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    For the first aid kit I would add Benadryl. Good for allergies, bug bites, can't get to sleep. Ibuprogin, as it will help with a twisted ankle, sprained wrist, as well as a head ache. I would also add a pack of Quikclot.

    Gear wise, I would swap out the big flashlight out for a headlamp. Pack the small one as a spare.

    The 40 is a nice weapon for some things, not so good for others. Depends on why your taking it.

    It's real easy to overpack. You don't mention what time of year or duration, but my summer pack for two weeks will weight in right about 45-50 pounds, complete.

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2PawsRiver View Post
    For the first aid kit I would add Benadryl. Good for allergies, bug bites, can't get to sleep. Ibuprogin, as it will help with a twisted ankle, sprained wrist, as well as a head ache. I would also add a pack of Quikclot.

    Gear wise, I would swap out the big flashlight out for a headlamp. Pack the small one as a spare.

    The 40 is a nice weapon for some things, not so good for others. Depends on why your taking it.

    It's real easy to overpack. You don't mention what time of year or duration, but my summer pack for two weeks will weight in right about 45-50 pounds, complete.
    Yeah in the plastic container I have medicine extra contacts and glasses, gum, candy, energy bars etc.
    I still need to get some bear spray not gonna use the .40 for that.
    I plan on camping spring and summer only so really no need for a flashlight but the headlamp is a good idea.

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    Member upinak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doug1980 View Post
    Yeah in the plastic container I have medicine extra contacts and glasses, gum, candy, energy bars etc.
    I still need to get some bear spray not gonna use the .40 for that.
    I plan on camping spring and summer only so really no need for a flashlight but the headlamp is a good idea.

    Take an extra set of older glasses. Contacts, and trying to put them in during a rain/wind storm is going to be more of a headache.
    No amount of education can help those who want to remain permanently ignorant of facts, which includes those whom have been educated.

  7. #7

    Default something to consider

    Id leave all three of those lights behind in exchange for a headlamp, ok maybe the small flashlight as b/u but it would at least be a small plastic instead of the mag. I'd probably only take half of the pcord there too. Small box of waterproof matches, I didnt see those in there. I dont usually have anything that requires me to carry a multi tool either but wouldnt fault my partner if he wanted to carry it.

    Everyone is a little different in what they like to carry, the more you get out there the more you'll start to figure out what you really need and what you can do without. Have fun.

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    Member Alasken's Avatar
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    Default good start

    I agree about the headlamp instead of the other lights.
    If I were just camping (not hunting) I would take the multi-tool and leave the other knives and saw at home.
    It looks like you have a ton of para cord which you could lighten up on.
    For extra clothing lightweight compression bags are hard to beat.
    Do you have anything for treating water?
    Have you weighed all your stuff yet?
    My favorite saying for backpacking is: "Ounces make pounds".
    Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.
    - Frank Zappa

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    Member akhunter3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by upinak View Post
    Hmm military poly pro. Get rid of it and get something more stable. The poly pro also smell.. bad.

    Take it from an ex-military wife, the stuff never gets really clean and the smell stays forever. Look at what other have for clothing gear as well. You can find deals, depending on your size.

    Also.. get a 30.06, you will never regret it.


    I like military poly-pro. Cheap, pretty darn warm, and if you wash it right it smells just fine. Besides, smell won't matter after a few days anyway



    Jon
    Nurse by night, Alaska adventurer by day!

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    Looks like it's coming along for you.
    As the previous poster said, ounces add up to pounds VERY quickly. if you can find yourself a cheap 5 lb scale, it will help you out a lot.

    First Picture: ditch the tin that the emergency kit is in; i don't carry a multitool with me, just a simple 3 inch blade knife. i have never needed a multitool on a backcountry hiking trip; go to one of the smaller lighters, you won't need that much; not sure what the bottom items are in that pic? one looks like magnesium fire starter, not sure what the others are; ditch some paracord, you won't need as much.

    2nd and 3rd pics: ditch the heavy light, i head out with just a headlamp, which in the summer in AK is all I have needed; you have three lights total that i see, a headlamp will do just fine; the saw and large knife are very heavy and I would leave those at home; what's in the rubbermaid container? leave the container at home, that is heavy.

    4th pic: if heading out in the summer, you won't need all that clothing. when out in the backcountry in AK during the summer (in a non-snow covered environment), i wear long synthetic pants, a short or long sleeve synthetic shirt, i carry a waterproof layer, and an insulation layer. i have an extra pair of underwear and socks and that is it. i smell bad at the end, but you're headed into the backcountry.

    5th pic: i would not take the .40 unless camping out at Jims creek. having backpacked in the appalachians, i feel very comfortable in AK. i would rather worry about bears then the two legged creatures. you're taking spray for bears, if the gun is for personal protection from humans, i wouldn't worry about that here. that is my opinion, maybe others don't feel as safe in the AK backcountry. if you do take it, leave some of the ammo at home.

    going overboard is always good if you are not comfortable out there the first time, as the comfort grows, you will learn what you can and can't live without, and your back and legs will thank you too. a scale will make you see the light and how much everything weighs.

    what are you drinking water out of?

    good luck and good job on the progress

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    In addition to the flashlights I would ditch the MRE, the multitool and the 40. Depending on how much that knife and scabbard weighs I may ditch it for a smaller lighter knife. Replace the mre with some powerbars, get a water filter or purification tablets and a 44mag or larger.

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    Member upinak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akhunter3 View Post
    I like military poly-pro. Cheap, pretty darn warm, and if you wash it right it smells just fine. Besides, smell won't matter after a few days anyway



    Jon
    Jon, you may love it but others may not. Excuse the expression "groin cheese" doesn't help a man backpacking and polypro is known to make men sweat, then stink worse and it doesn't let you dry out. It also isn't great when raining.

    doug, go to www.wintersilks.com and check on the layering stuff they have there. It is worth the money, very light, dries fast and it doesn't smell or keep them. And it isn't bulky at all.
    No amount of education can help those who want to remain permanently ignorant of facts, which includes those whom have been educated.

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the input everyone. Seems like the consensus is to lighten it up a bit. Guess I'm used to camping in Indiana where flashlights are important. I am still adding to it and trying to find alternate clothing and various other things. I still need some cookware and water filtration, and am looking for better rain gear. Work in progress...

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    Member upinak's Avatar
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    I like the REI titanium cookware. You can put it all in one and it is very light weight... but pricey. But worth the money.

    Quote Originally Posted by doug1980 View Post
    Thanks for all the input everyone. Seems like the consensus is to lighten it up a bit. Guess I'm used to camping in Indiana where flashlights are important. I am still adding to it and trying to find alternate clothing and various other things. I still need some cookware and water filtration, and am looking for better rain gear. Work in progress...
    No amount of education can help those who want to remain permanently ignorant of facts, which includes those whom have been educated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by upinak View Post
    I like the REI titanium cookware. You can put it all in one and it is very light weight... but pricey. But worth the money.
    Thanks I'll go check that out. As for the poly pro I used that while deployed to Iraq and Kuwait with no problems. Never noticed the "smell" but am wanting something less bulky. For now that's what I have and it does keep me warm, even if I stink.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Ditch the desert camo .40 holster too, they are barely comfortable wearing around the fob, definately not something to use busting brush in AK. They do look cool though if that is your thing. As said above either go up in cal or down cause a .40 isn't really good for anything but people. A .22 revolver will keep you in birds and squirels and a .44 if bears are thick. What kind of tent is in that roll? Make sure it has a rain fly that goes purty near to the ground. I don't like any military coton camo for hiking AK. I go only synthetic for pants and shirts. There are a couple good buys on the military side though. The Duke dri shirts are poly cotton they are comfortable, cheap, and dry pretty fast. I still buy $7 athletic works shirts at walmart and prefer them to anything else on the market. I use a poly pro shirt extensively and I love it. The key is not to hang dry them only or they get pilled up. I find them very comfortable. My cousin wears one of the olive drab military sleep shirts and loves it as well. I would trade the box knife super cheap razor blade for a havel knife, same basic primise but better handle and it has replaceable autopsy blades that are great. I invested in expedition underwear and I take 2 pair on any trip over 2 nights one on and one in the bag. The exoficio ones I have wacs easily in a stream and dry extremely fast. Socks is a bigger challenge I like merino wool expecially ones with some elastic around the foot as it keeps them from deforming. I don't take extra cloths backpacking except perhaps a spare under shirt, and that is only for trips over 5 days.

    There is definately room to cut A LOT of weight but that will come in time. You seem to have what you need to get out and have fun! What are you wearing for boots?

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    Member doug1980's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Ditch the desert camo .40 holster too, they are barely comfortable wearing around the fob, definately not something to use busting brush in AK. They do look cool though if that is your thing. As said above either go up in cal or down cause a .40 isn't really good for anything but people. A .22 revolver will keep you in birds and squirels and a .44 if bears are thick. What kind of tent is in that roll? Make sure it has a rain fly that goes purty near to the ground. I don't like any military coton camo for hiking AK. I go only synthetic for pants and shirts. There are a couple good buys on the military side though. The Duke dri shirts are poly cotton they are comfortable, cheap, and dry pretty fast. I still buy $7 athletic works shirts at walmart and prefer them to anything else on the market. I use a poly pro shirt extensively and I love it. The key is not to hang dry them only or they get pilled up. I find them very comfortable. My cousin wears one of the olive drab military sleep shirts and loves it as well. I would trade the box knife super cheap razor blade for a havel knife, same basic primise but better handle and it has replaceable autopsy blades that are great. I invested in expedition underwear and I take 2 pair on any trip over 2 nights one on and one in the bag. The exoficio ones I have wacs easily in a stream and dry extremely fast. Socks is a bigger challenge I like merino wool expecially ones with some elastic around the foot as it keeps them from deforming. I don't take extra cloths backpacking except perhaps a spare under shirt, and that is only for trips over 5 days.

    There is definately room to cut A LOT of weight but that will come in time. You seem to have what you need to get out and have fun! What are you wearing for boots?
    Well for clothes it has been beat in my head that cotton kills. So no cotton. The gun...well I didn't buy it for bear protection, nor do I plan to take it with me every time I go. I use this set up not only for hiking but also when I go off roading and camping as well. So some items will be ditched when I just plan to hike. Boots I bought some Hi Tecs but so far they seem uncomfortable too narrow. I have wide feet but the sales lady assured me that these would be great. Haven't used them out there yet so we'll see. The tent is an "el cheapo" from K-Mart (Northwest Territory 7'x7' dome tent) it has a rainfly but only goes 1/3 of the way down. Gonna try it out but am sure I'll need to upgrade.

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    some internet sites to look for on-sale gear, especially the cookware:

    rei.com/outlet
    steepandcheap.com
    sierratradingpost
    mountaingear.com
    campmor.com

    take a look at those sites from time to time for good gear at a discount. i have always be a fan of buying something good once, instead of buying crap over and over again, and in the end you spend more money then if you bought the good stuff once.

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    Quote Originally Posted by upinak View Post
    Jon, you may love it but others may not. Excuse the expression "groin cheese" doesn't help a man backpacking and polypro is known to make men sweat, then stink worse and it doesn't let you dry out. It also isn't great when raining.

    doug, go to www.wintersilks.com and check on the layering stuff they have there. It is worth the money, very light, dries fast and it doesn't smell or keep them. And it isn't bulky at all.
    I've never had a problem with it not letting me dry out. Then again, I sweat easily so usually I'm just wearing a t-shirt when doing any packing. The poly is normally for day hikes and camp. It should be a layering device, not sure why you would be exposing it to rain?? Keep that stuff under your HH or some other top shell.


    Jon
    Nurse by night, Alaska adventurer by day!

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    Exclamation Need Quikclot in your 1st aid kit

    I had an experience on a hiking trip where I am sure glad I followed the advice from one of the folks on this site. We were in a very rough, remote mountain area where one of our group took a really bad fall. He slashed his leg and was bleeding profusely. A couple of months ago, I saw a posting that suggested that Quikclot was real asset to have in your backcountry bag of tricks and I had purchased some. My friend was in real distress and we would have a major problem to get him to medical care. We tried to use conventional gauze and pressure to stop his bleeding, but to no avail. I remembered that I had some Quikclot Sport in my first aid kit and opened the package, placed it over his wound and applied pressure for several minutes. The bleeding totally stopped and we were able to get it butterflied and bandaged enough that we could help him out to the trailhead. He ultimately needed stitches, but without the Quikclot, the situation could have been a major problem. You can buy the Quikclot on line at Quikclot.com or at Cabelas.com. You might not need it often, but, when you need it, you need it badly!

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