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Thread: tundra 550 vs 800

  1. #1
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    Default tundra 550 vs 800

    anyone have any good, bad, or ugly on the tundra lt 550 or the 800
    interested in whats out there....????

  2. #2
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    Default

    The 550 is not known for it's fuel mileage. The 800 I wouldn't recommend for trappers or anyone that wants to putt around on hard trails. Just like any liquid cooled machine it needs to be moving to throw snow on the heat exchangers and keep cool (with the exception of the 800 widetracks). You could install the $960 fan/radiator kit (not including installation) to solve any overheating problem though.

    Both are real good machines.

  3. #3
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    Thumbs up 800

    i've got the 800 and love it. it's the 5th sled i've bought in alaska and my favorite so far. i'll tell you the down side first since everything has a downside. whatever moron put the spark plugs where they are, they never thought they would need to be changed...although i haven't had to change them yet. also no pull start in case, the battery would die. i had that happen at about 30 below zero so i don't plan on using it when its 30 below zero and it would sit over night.

    now the upside...it gets smokin' good mileage but doesn't make any smoke. i've gone over 200 miles without putting any gas in the tank. in fact it burns no oil either. add to that it's extremely quiet. low end torque is extra ballsy and top end is plenty fast for me (about80mph). i did install speedometer/odometer. i think it's the best combination utility sled/play toy i've had

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    I have a 550F in my '04 Skandic Sport. Always starts on the 2nd or 3rd pull, even at -50F (tested myself, not a lot of fun). Fan cooled is the way to go since (A) you can travel over crud that doesn't throw up much snow needed for a liquid cooled machine, and (B) it's great for thawing hands/face/goggles/etc at the output vent on the left of the cowling. Averages about 10 mpg, but I can haul a lot of jugs on a long trip if needed. I'd rather do that then have to depend on a rig that requires electric start and needs to be preheated in the deep cold - you can't control the weather. However, I do know some folks that carry a Honda EU1000 gen set in their freight sled for their 800's - it's a trade off either way.

    My money would be on the 550F.

  5. #5
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    Default Tundra 800 & 550

    Quote Originally Posted by holly View Post
    i've got the 800 and love it. it's the 5th sled i've bought in alaska and my favorite so far. i'll tell you the down side first since everything has a downside. whatever moron put the spark plugs where they are, they never thought they would need to be changed...although i haven't had to change them yet. also no pull start in case, the battery would die. i had that happen at about 30 below zero so i don't plan on using it when its 30 below zero and it would sit over night.

    now the upside...it gets smokin' good mileage but doesn't make any smoke. i've gone over 200 miles without putting any gas in the tank. in fact it burns no oil either. add to that it's extremely quiet. low end torque is extra ballsy and top end is plenty fast for me (about80mph). i did install speedometer/odometer. i think it's the best combination utility sled/play toy i've had
    holly hit the nail on the head w/ the 800 Tundra!!!

    Fortunately, the plugs should go and go - kinda like a car or truck.

    Not sure on the pull start... only to say that it may be the issue of being one heck of a torquer to pull off. Likely a short, noticeably heavy pull that some might not ever be able to start or want to keep pulling on w/ any repetition. It probably would also not be placed in the traditional, convenient spot on the sled. I just don't know???

    The 550 F gets much less gas mileage, needs way more oil, and is one of the worst polluters going on an index of air quality. However, the 800 is more expensive, heavier, harder to get unstuck, finds its power groove at higher speeds, and could become more difficult to start in severe cold or prolonged periods of non-use without taking some precautionary measures.

    I'd go the 550F over the 800. My bias is that I know the 550F version. It's a pretty proven, more common motor. It serves the sport/utility combo so well without needing to become heavier. I'd like more experience w/ the 800... just haven't had the opportunity.

  6. #6
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default Im with Alaskan XL

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskan XL View Post
    I have a 550F in my '04 Skandic Sport. Always starts on the 2nd or 3rd pull, even at -50F (tested myself, not a lot of fun). Fan cooled is the way to go since (A) you can travel over crud that doesn't throw up much snow needed for a liquid cooled machine, and (B) it's great for thawing hands/face/goggles/etc at the output vent on the left of the cowling. Averages about 10 mpg, but I can haul a lot of jugs on a long trip if needed. I'd rather do that then have to depend on a rig that requires electric start and needs to be preheated in the deep cold - you can't control the weather. However, I do know some folks that carry a Honda EU1000 gen set in their freight sled for their 800's - it's a trade off either way.

    My money would be on the 550F.
    It becomes a real safety issue if you live where there are cold temps. Here in the interior I have headed out for a weekend of camping that was forecasted to be -10 to 0 and it turned out it was more like -50 to -40. In those conditions if you don't have a way to preheat your sled your in a bit of trouble with the V800, IMO. Im not a big fan of the weight difference either but I also test my sleds and get them stuck a lot. The only upside is the milage in my book and I can compinsate for that by bringing extra gas.

    byrd.

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    Default most trips

    i'm in fbks and almost all sledding is perfect for the tundra. but i agree, if it's gonna be cold and i'm dumb enough to go out (often the case), i'll take along my blue smoke making yamaha and drag gas cans instead. i have noticed it's not as comfortable compared to the tundra, it's louder than i remembered, and i can follow a smoke trail back home if i get turned around.

  8. #8
    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    I just made that decision not too long ago. I had a bearcat 660T widetrack 4 stroke. I liked it but it did like to overheat on trails hauling a decent load at slow speeds. I was also worried about the cold weather starting. I only got to use mine down to about -10 and it started, but I know there are going to be times when I get back to the cabin and it drops below that. I did like the fuel mileage, but the Tundra 550 is a big step up from my previous 700 liquid cooled machine so that doesnt bother me too much. I was also impressed with the powerband and speed of the 550. I was expecting quite a bit less than it turned out to be. And finally weight was the last issue that made my decision. I tried to pick up the front end of the 800 compared to the 550 and that was all it took!
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  9. #9
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    thanks for the responses guys.......looking @ what's out there for that great dual purpose machine. i.e. hauling moderate loads of freight, playing in the snow, climbing hills...ect.. probably better than powder machine...
    thanks

  10. #10
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Default

    The key to getting your 4 stroke sled up and running the next morning is to tarp it the night before! The last thing we do before bed is to let it idel for about 20 minutes (or take a spirited ride!) then shut it down and immediately wrap the cowling tight with a tarp. Then we just fire it back up durring the morning wiz and we are set for day 2. I have done this on multi day rides at -40 and never had a problem. It also helps on bigger 2 stroke machines as well. An 800 can be a bear to pull over at that temp, but tarping it warm before bed makes it pretty easy! It is also another reason to warm your sled and then put the cover on it before trailering any distance in the cold!

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