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Thread: Why would my reloads jam my 1911?

  1. #1
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Default Why would my reloads jam my 1911?

    had stovepipes aplenty with the gun today. Now this gun I have only shot maybe a few magazines worth of blazer through it. No problems.


    Today I tried my Handloads out. And stovepipes every 5-8 rounds.

    Gun is 10 mm. I tried both 135 and 180 grain bullets. Both were loaded right in the middle of powder charge data and also seated right in the middle of recommended OAL

    I brought the gun to a gun store to two knowledgable people. They said it was probably my handloads. Or that I needed to shoot it 500 times to loosen it up some. Gun is a pricey Fusion that was custom made for me. Both guys thought it was well put together gun. So I bought a box of factory remingtons to try out tommorow.

    In the meantime any ideas what my handloads might have to do with stovepiping?

  2. #2
    Charterboat Operator kodiakcombo's Avatar
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    Default bump up the charge

    Either bump up the charge or wear the one you have out. My 2 cents, I used to have national matchgold cup, I used to melt my own lead, what a mess, the inside of my barrel looked like it was loosing scales!
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  3. #3
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    Default My experiences

    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    had stovepipes aplenty with the gun today. Now this gun I have only shot maybe a few magazines worth of blazer through it. No problems.


    Today I tried my Handloads out. And stovepipes every 5-8 rounds.

    Gun is 10 mm. I tried both 135 and 180 grain bullets. Both were loaded right in the middle of powder charge data and also seated right in the middle of recommended OAL

    I brought the gun to a gun store to two knowledgable people. They said it was probably my handloads. Or that I needed to shoot it 500 times to loosen it up some. Gun is a pricey Fusion that was custom made for me. Both guys thought it was well put together gun. So I bought a box of factory remingtons to try out tommorow.

    In the meantime any ideas what my handloads might have to do with stovepiping?
    Matt,

    When shooting one of my 1911 .45s I had stovepipes from handloads I was able to cure the problem by holding the gun tighter (I have a tendency to "limp wrist" whem shooting at bullseye targets. I acknowledge, the loads were a bit light.

    Held loosley, I had stovepipes or failure to eject, sometimes rechambering the spent round. Sometimes the spent round would eject, but I found the slide closed on an empty chamber, failing to strip a fresh round from the magazine.

    Held tightly, almost all rounds ejected well.

    A lighter recoil spring would cure the problem for your handloads, probably, but remember to change to the standard spring when shooting full loads. The gun will work, but batter itself to death with too light a spring.

    What happens is that the recoil does not have enough energy to send the slide all the way back, resulting in a less than energetic ejection or a failure
    to eject. If the slide does not come back far enough to strip a round from the magazine, you might wind up with an empty chamber.

    This is my guess.

    If your gun is brand new and a little wearing in is needed, you might want to give it a thorough cleaning and lube (if you are shooting outdoors) with the lightest lube you have. Reduce the drag on the slide as much as possible.

    Do you have access to a chronograph? If you find your handloads are slower than factory loads in the same bullet weight, of course) that would lend more weight to my theory.

    Test my theory by buying a lighter spring, or if not available, a spare spring and clipping one coil off, or two. If the problem improves, I think there is your answer.

    Good luck.

    Lost Sheep

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    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    had stovepipes aplenty with the gun today. Now this gun I have only shot maybe a few magazines worth of blazer through it. No problems.


    Today I tried my Handloads out. And stovepipes every 5-8 rounds.

    Gun is 10 mm. I tried both 135 and 180 grain bullets. Both were loaded right in the middle of powder charge data and also seated right in the middle of recommended OAL

    I brought the gun to a gun store to two knowledgable people. They said it was probably my handloads. Or that I needed to shoot it 500 times to loosen it up some. Gun is a pricey Fusion that was custom made for me. Both guys thought it was well put together gun. So I bought a box of factory remingtons to try out tommorow.

    In the meantime any ideas what my handloads might have to do with stovepiping?
    Stove pipe jams are typically limp wristing the gun, underpowered ammo, or tight/rough action. What's going on is the recoil is either not sufficient (underpowered ammo) or is being absorbed by you flexable wrist (not locked up well with good grip) or the recoil energy is being "used up" by a tight/rough (too much friction) action. The remedy for each should be obvious. The break-in period of any auto-loader handgun is best done with full power ammo and 500 rounds seems to be a good number.

    If the gun functions well with factory ammo (full power) you can eliminate the other two possibilities. Shoot the gun one handed weak hand if you want to duplicate the limp-wrist stove pipe.

    For a loading tip I'd say make a consistant taper crimp on each round and make sure the are at the proper overall length.
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  5. #5
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    Default My experiences

    Quote Originally Posted by rimfirematt View Post
    had stovepipes aplenty with the gun today. Now this gun I have only shot maybe a few magazines worth of blazer through it. No problems.


    Today I tried my Handloads out. And stovepipes every 5-8 rounds.

    Gun is 10 mm. I tried both 135 and 180 grain bullets. Both were loaded right in the middle of powder charge data and also seated right in the middle of recommended OAL

    I brought the gun to a gun store to two knowledgable people. They said it was probably my handloads. Or that I needed to shoot it 500 times to loosen it up some. Gun is a pricey Fusion that was custom made for me. Both guys thought it was well put together gun. So I bought a box of factory remingtons to try out tommorow.

    In the meantime any ideas what my handloads might have to do with stovepiping?
    Matt,

    When shooting one of my 1911 .45s I had stovepipes from handloads I was able to cure the problem by holding the gun tighter (I have a tendency to "limp wrist" whem shooting at bullseye targets. I acknowledge, the loads were a bit light.

    Held loosley, I had stovepipes or failure to eject, sometimes rechambering the spent round. Sometimes the spent round would eject, but I found the slide closed on an empty chamber, failing to strip a fresh round from the magazine.

    Held tightly, almost all rounds ejected well.

    A lighter recoil spring would cure the problem for your handloads, probably, but remember to change to the standard spring when shooting full loads. The gun will work, but batter itself to death with too light a spring.

    What happens is that the recoil does not have enough energy to send the slide all the way back, resulting in a less than energetic ejection or a failure to eject. If the slide does not come back far enough to strip a round from the magazine, you might wind up with an empty chamber.

    This is my guess.

    If your gun is brand new and a little wearing in is needed, you might want to give it a thorough cleaning and lube (if you are shooting outdoors) with the lightest lube you have. Reduce the drag on the slide as much as possible.

    Do you have access to a chronograph? If you find your handloads are slower than factory loads in the same bullet weight, of course) that would lend more weight to my theory.

    Test my theory by buying a lighter spring, or if not available, a spare spring and clipping one coil off, or two. If the problem improves, I think there is your answer.

    Good luck.

    Lost Sheep

  6. #6
    Member marshall's Avatar
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    I agree with the limp wrist comments. My wife likes to shoot but doesn't like the recoil that my compact H&K 40S&W gives her. I load her rounds with Berry's plated 165gr over 3.2gr of Tight Group . If she doesn't hold it right it will fail to function. Proper grip and very little recoil, even my 10year daughter shoots it.

    Turns out that this light load works out well for weak hand shooting and training, a poor grip results in malfunctions every time.

  7. #7
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Took the gun out again, this time with a box of remingtons. I have 3 mags for this gun. 1 mag stovepiped several times. The other 2 were better. One time one of them failed to hold open the slide on last round. But no stovepipes with the factory ammo. But, I did get stovepipes again with my reloads on both the "good mags".

    One time also my gun locked up bad, and required alot of force to get the slide open. That was with a reload.

    The reloads today were loaded one notch below Max.

    When I shot, I really concentrated on just holding that gun tight. Not so much aiming.

    Oh yeah, cleaning the gun last night, I noticed my recoil spring rod was loose. It loosened up again today shooting. I really hate to loctite that stupid thing. I really want to get the normal one that my dan wesson had. Makes everything easier.


    In another thread though I mentioned the glock fed and ejected everything I had on me today.

  8. #8
    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Thumbs forward grip, if your thumb rides the slide release your slide will not stay open on an empty magazine.

    I don't know your experience level and I don't mean to down size your shooting ability. A lot of shooters that are new to semi auto's have both of the problems that you are describing.

    Hit the range with a guy that shoots semi's with competency and get a few grip and thumb position pointers. Don't be embarrassed to ask for help from a good shooter, they will gladly help.

  9. #9
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Well I am taking your guys suggestions about my techniqe seriously. But, this is my 4th 1911 and this is the first time Ive had these problems. I shot a guys colt today too. It didnt have a problem with me shooting

    I know one magazine is bad. That sucker stovepiped 4 out of 16. The other 2 didnt stove on the factory ammo. They did on the reloads though.

    Me draggin the slide wasnt it either. It took a few racks of the slide to get it to hold open. But that problem never happened again. Maybe I banged on the mag release or something.

    what about that Guide rod being loose? No one thinks that is a contributer?

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    Default A shot in the dark

    Quote Originally Posted by Rimfirematt
    Well I am taking your guys suggestions about my techniqe seriously. But, this is my 4th 1911 and this is the first time Ive had these problems. I shot a guys colt today too. It didnt have a problem with me shooting

    I know one magazine is bad. That sucker stovepiped 4 out of 16. The other 2 didnt stove on the factory ammo. They did on the reloads though.

    Me draggin the slide wasnt it either. It took a few racks of the slide to get it to hold open. But that problem never happened again. Maybe I banged on the mag release or something.

    what about that Guide rod being loose? No one thinks that is a contributer?
    Matt,

    The guide rod is a possibility, even probable. But it should not vary between magazines. Count it as a contributing factor, but not the main cause.

    Did you get a chance to try the same magazines in another gun?

    Could it be the slide dragging on the magazines, one more than the others?

    I am just guessing here, but even a blind squirrel can find a nut once in a while.

    I guess we have eliminated your grip technique as a causative factor, but the reloads still behave differently from the factory rounds. Is there a difference in felt recoil between them? Can you chronograph them?

    Thanks for an interesting puzzle.

    Lost Sheep

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    On my clips I take them apart and smooth the edges on the piece on top of the spring so it will not drag anywhere on the clip housing as it is feeding rounds up. Just an idea I'm no expert at all.

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  12. #12
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    Well a email to fusion was answered right away today. He told me to send the gun back and they will tune it to whatever load I want. That company has been great!

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