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Thread: Cessna 206?

  1. #1
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    Default Cessna 206?

    Hey all,
    First time poster on here but figured I could find some good answers perhaps...Anyway I just came up on a job for doing some jump flying in a 206 in the Northeast. I figured I should come with a little bit of knowledge of the plane...was wondering if anyone had info/tips about the plane. I've flown a bunch of cessnas but have more experience with pipers and the PC-12 I fly. Any info would be great! Thanks a ton! -Josh

  2. #2
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    Default 206

    I good 206 kicks some butt. Here in Alaska a 206u is a very workable plane. I know a guy who at gross max(ok, maybe a litle over) could get it up in 550 feet, they are even better with a horton stol kit. They are great planes in set up right. Wish I owned one.

    Terry

  3. #3

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    I have a lot of time in a 1964 206. It is the first year on it's own type certificate. Until 67 the plane had a smaller horizontal stab and it is possible in certain slow/heavy configs to stall the tail a bit early on flair. When this happens the nose drops hard. VG's help this a lot. The later models only got better though heavier. All in all the 206 is a great stabile platform. It is heavy in control input, but very solid. It is used in applications here in Alaska that are amazing.

  4. #4
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    Default Grizzly 1

    Hi, Terry,

    The Cessna 206 has only one drawback: electric flaps. Unless you're operating from really short strips, that won't bother you much, I'm sure.

    I have a couple thousand hours in a 1978 Cessna 206, both on wheels and on Edo floats. I thought at airplane couldn't be beat for outback flying. Again, except for the slower electric flaps, that is, when on wheels. On wheels, it would carry a full 92-gallon avgas load, one passenger, three full 55-gallon fuel drums, and some miscellaneous grub. It did this in and out of a bush ice strip (snowblower-made on the lake at our High Lake Lodge) that measured 960-feet long by 12-feet wide. With the landing gear measuring 8'-5" from outside to outside, this narrow strip kept wintertime thieves from the property. It just didn't look like an airstrip from the air.

    I later bought a 1984 turbocharged Cessna 206 on amphibious Wipline floats. Best danged airplane that I ever owned. My first flight - - - from Lake Hood to King Bear Lodge on the Yentna River, was overloaded by slightly more than 600-lbs. I really didn't think it would come off the water, since I knew the Edo floats on my previous C-206 wouldn't have, but it came off with room to spare.

    The 206 line of Stationairs has that HUGE 4' x 4' loading door, which is a boon to all outback fliers. My recommendation? By all means fly the Cessna 206. It's comfortable and capable. A rare beast among rare beasts.

    Keep the blue side up,

    Mort Mason

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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by jallenjet View Post
    Hey all,
    First time poster on here but figured I could find some good answers perhaps...Anyway I just came up on a job for doing some jump flying in a 206 in the Northeast. I figured I should come with a little bit of knowledge of the plane...was wondering if anyone had info/tips about the plane. I've flown a bunch of cessnas but have more experience with pipers and the PC-12 I fly. Any info would be great! Thanks a ton! -Josh
    Hey Terry,

    Forgot to mention: you'll need a door fairing if you're planning to fly that Stationair without its door (for jump flying). Easy to install. You'll also need the hinge pins that are easily removable, so that you're not forever into a maintenance problem every time you want to put the door back on.

    The airplane flies just fine without the door, but WITH the fairing.

    Mort

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    Default

    thanks for the tips guys its much appreciated...these 206's have the door missing with the fairing and all the works...Not exactly sure which model 206 it is but I am working on finding out....thanks again!

  7. #7
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    OK here are some tips: Jumpers will shut off your fuel when your new as a joke, also pull out the mixture as they leave. Just remember them and on a nice windy day apply some rudder and a gentle bank when they are spotting themselfs. You'll have a lot of fun, enjoy! Which drop zone are you going to work at? Tom

  8. #8

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    Go to diverdriver.com there is everything you could ever want to know about flying jumpers. I worked (and jumped) at skydivechicago and skydive Ixtapa (Mexico) flying twin otters and the occasional 182 load. You will have a lot of fun, jumpers are an easy group to get along with.

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