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Thread: Meat/Bone Saw for processing.

  1. #1
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Default Meat/Bone Saw for processing.

    I am looking for a good saw to process my moose and any other game in the future. Primarily cutting the ribs into smaller racks while leaving the meat on the bone.

    Any one have any 1st hand knowledge and or advice. Not looking for the most expensive model or the cheapest; but the one that will get the job done with out breaking the bank.

    Thanks in advance!
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

  2. #2

    Default

    If your looking for a saw to process at home, Cabelas has a meat saw about 18" long blade for under 40$, in the field i use a folding Wyoming saw.
    Frank
    Alaska Wildrose Charters and Cabins
    www.wildroselodge.com

  3. #3
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Default Cabela's Saw.

    Quote Originally Posted by profishguide View Post
    If your looking for a saw to process at home, Cabelas has a meat saw about 18" long blade for under 40$, in the field i use a folding Wyoming saw.
    Profishguide, have you used this saw? If so, which size, 16" or 25"?
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

  4. #4
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    Default

    I have used a Wyoming saw for years. Comes with two blades. A meat/bone blade and a bush/tree blade. Mine is the shorter one. I think I would like to have the longer one but the one i have works good.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Agreed

    I aggree with Snyd. The Wymoning saw is a great little tool with both blades. On longer base camp hunts it is a great tool to take along.

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    Default recip saw

    If you are processing at home a reciprocating saw would make short order out of the work. use a fine tooth blade. In the field I think the wyoming saw in the longer length would be good. I have used both on Whitetails before moving to AK.

  7. #7
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default Wyoming saw

    I have the short version as well. As far as a good boning saw..... I'm not overly impressed with it. For what you are wanting to do, cutting ribs with meat on, the frame sometimes gets in the way and binds things up. It works great for limbs and firewood. I carry it all the time on the wheeler and on my snowmachine and have used it a lot.

    For whacking ribs, you may want to think about a simple hatchet. Keep it sharp and it will knock ribs out with ease.
    AKmud
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  8. #8
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    Default

    There's a butcher equipment store down here in Anchorage. You might give them a call and see what they have and if they'll ship a saw up there. I know others have bought from them with no problems.
    Alaska Butcher Equipment and Supply
    4507 Mountain View Rd.
    258-7502

  9. #9
    Member AKArcher's Avatar
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    Default Thanks for the info...

    I decided to get the Wyoming Saw, larger model. I wanted a multi-use tool, as $40 is a lot of a single use item.

    Wow...butchering a moose is no easy task. I guess for my first time butchering an animal I went for the grandaddy in size and work. It makes paying for it seem a little easier. Although, I know for sure that the meat I am eating is mine, and I know that it is clean and hair-free. I am sure the processors wouldn't swap meat, but do you really know? The experience and lessons learned was worth every sleepless minute for the last two nights.

    Thanks again.

    Oh yes, the saw worked great after I figured out how to get the blade tight. Patience is always the answer.
    When all else fails...ask your old-man.


    AKArcher

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