Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Beginner

  1. #1
    Member SperBear's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    AK
    Posts
    114

    Default Beginner

    I am currently a full-time college student here in AK. I am extremely interested in flying, but I am not certain on how to get involved with Alaskan Aviation at this point. I understand that it is very expensive, but in my mind it is worth every penny. I plan on owning a supercub in the future, so I was debating jumping right into flight lessons (after college), or something else? I have also heard that there is a "Lighter Weight Class" flying that is much cheaper and takes half the time to become certified, I believe it was for pipers, planes of that sort. Other than lessons, classes atUAA what are some good ways to associate myself into the world of aviation, (Alaska Style)...???

  2. #2
    Moderator Adison's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    217

    Default Beginner

    Welcome Sperbear, Glad to see that you want to fly. I would suggest that you check out all of the flight schools in the Anchorage area and find the school and instructor (very improtant to find an instructor that you fit with) that fits your schedule and budget. Yes it is expensive, but prices will never be any lower than they are right now. I wish that I had finished when it only cost $3000 for a license, see my point.

    The light weight class that you are refering to is called the "Light Sport Catagory" and is relatively new. I know you are limited to only one passenger, a maximum gross weight for the aircraft and I believe you are also limited on how far you can fly from your "home" airport.

    The best way to find out about flying, especially in Alaska, is to become an old fashioned "Airport Bum" and hang out and make some friends and learn from them.
    Adison

  3. #3

    Default need a CFI Friend

    The best way is to get a CFI friend with plane who will teach you for cost. Otherwise, start rolling out the C notes.
    Unfortunatley, there is no slam dunk way into flying now. I am a successful professional, with two college degrees, and my income alone is WELL above the median Anchorage household income, and it's still tough.
    Find a CFI friend with a plane.
    -Steve

  4. #4
    Member Toddler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    552

    Talking Military

    You could always do it the hard way. Join the Military and have them teach you to fly … and get paid for it to boot. There is that nasty little detail about being sent to a combat zone though, but the up side is the F-18 is a sweet ride!

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,256

    Default

    Here's my advice. If your goal is to get a pilot's license, by all means sign up with a flight school and get it. You'll rarely fly after that, but your goal will have been achieved.

    If you want to be a flyer? Scrimp and save and buy an airplane. It may not be the perfect plane, but it'll be yours, and that's a pretty good start. Now find a CFI to teach you in your own plane. You expense will be reduced, your familiarity in your own plane will be increased, and once you're a licensed pilot, you'll have the ability to fly without renting. That's huge.

    Good luck. No, great luck. The world needs more private pilots.

  6. #6
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK
    Posts
    694

    Default Cfii

    Does anyone know a CFII that will instruct in someone else plane. I plan on buying my own plane here shortly and cant believe I have to rent a plane. Everywhere I've checked said you have to use there planes.

    Terry

  7. #7
    Member Toddler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    552

    Default

    A lot of it has to do with what plane they are insured in. If you buy a plane you will need to insure your instructor and that is a huge pain in the A. The other option is that you assume all of the risk and I do not think that there are many CFI’s out there that will go for that. I have a couple of friends I will ask in the AM and post back.

    Drew

  8. #8

    Default Both feet...

    If you're sure it's something you want to do, just jump right in. You can buy a very capable off-airport plane for $20,000 or less. It's hell on the beer budget, but that can be done even as a student. A partnership can reduce that by however many partners you can scrounge up. I've seen several Tcarts sell for less around $15K in the last several years. Champs can be had for around $20K. Either will get you in and out of 80% of the places most Supercubs go. If you change your mind you'll get your money back (unless you change your mind AFTER the wreck!).

    I spent around $2500 total getting my license after I owned the airplane. That's a pretty good start on owning a plane, versus what it would cost to learn in a rented spam can.

    There are lots of instructors willing to teach you in your own airplane. A little time wandering around ANC or FAI should turn up a few of them.

    If you are mechanically inclined, or capable of learning, you can do pretty much all of your own maintenance under the supervision of a mechanic. You'll learn a lot about your particular airplane in the process, and end up with better work than if you just paid someone to do it for you.

    Owning an airplane, especially in AK, doesn't have to be overly expensive, regardless of what you might read in the glossy "lookit my new glass-panel Bonanza" magazines.

    Good luck!

  9. #9
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK
    Posts
    694

    Default Would love to

    Would love to find a TaylorCraft in decent Shape, actually started looking a couple weeks ago. If you have a line on one drop me a PM. Thanks terry

  10. #10
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Ak.
    Posts
    4,061

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 73E View Post

    If you are mechanically inclined, or capable of learning, you can do pretty much all of your own maintenance under the supervision of a mechanic. You'll learn a lot about your particular airplane in the process, and end up with better work than if you just paid someone to do it for you.
    .
    Good luck!
    Excuse me! Better work? Hahahahaha. Yea, after several years of LEARNING under the supervision of a licensed mechanic.
    Obviously spoken by someone who doesn't have an A&P, IA license.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    470

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    Does anyone know a CFII that will instruct in someone else plane. I plan on buying my own plane here shortly and cant believe I have to rent a plane. Everywhere I've checked said you have to use there planes.

    Terry
    If you're in the Anchorage area you might try getting ahold of Herbert Hubbard. I got my CFI through him and he was doing a lot of free lance then. That was a few years ago and he could be retired by now, but you might give him a call. I don't have a number for him but he should be listed....Louis

  12. #12

    Default Hubbard

    I just spoke to him today. Send me a PM and I'll give you his cell #.

  13. #13
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, Ak.
    Posts
    4,061

    Default

    Care to try again, 73?
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  14. #14
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    3,940

    Default owner vs renter

    Mr Pid is right if you really want to dive in...

    Owning a beater plane that flies is better than wasting time wishing for one you can't afford. My first plane was a real beater Super Cub, but it flew.

    Plus when you spend ever dollar you have on a plane, you sort of force yourself to learn to fly the thing.

    As long as it is a good plane to learn with....

    The reason I say that, is that I know of a Luscombe for sale in Anchorage right now because the student pilot who bought it two years ago can't fly the thing. So it sits in the tie-down and he does not have his license.

    Do I think they are hard to fly? No...

    But it does not matter what I think.
    Had he bought a 150, 152 or 172, (the planes he was already flying) he would have his license a year ago and could have flown down here to Homer, so I could teach him tail-wheel or float flying in my Cub.

    I used to also have a C-150-160hp that I used as a primary trainer which was pretty cheap since it was a high time engine. (plus fast as all getout).
    But the insurance was almost $10,000 per year since I was letting student pilots solo the thing all over the place. So I decided to keep my PA-11 float-Cub and sell the C-150-160.

    I still have a few primary students, most of whom started out in my Cub on floats and got hooked. So now they are flying whatever they could afford and I instruct in their planes.
    The rest of my clients are already pilots, who need (or want) their float rating and tail-wheel endorsements.


    My oldest aughter lives up in Anchorage and decided to join the Elmendorf Aero Club when she came back from her year in Iraq (combat engineer). If you have a daughter you know why she did not finish with me...
    Anyway she is still in the reserves and thought that would be the cheap way to go. It sure looks like it would on paper....
    BUT not so.. It all depends on how fast you push them and how slow they want to to go, in order to keep your money heading their way.
    When you have your own plane, the scheduling conflicts and in-house BS that takes place in many of the schools is no longer a factor...


    dragonfly@alaska.net


    xx

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •