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Thread: Possible Mt. Redoubt eruption

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    Default Possible Mt. Redoubt eruption

    Anyone in the area taking extra precautions? We live near Homer and aside from having our usual stores and backup water we are including some industrial dust masks in our car kits in case she blows and ash comes our way while we are at work.
    Just wondering....


    Kindest Regards,

    Mountaintrekker

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    Member Bearclaw67's Avatar
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    Haven't yet but probably should.
    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountaintrekker View Post
    Anyone in the area taking extra precautions? We live near Homer and aside from having our usual stores and backup water we are including some industrial dust masks in our car kits in case she blows and ash comes our way while we are at work.
    Just wondering....Mountaintrekker
    Buy a spare air filter for your truck, or maybe two if you do your own maintenance anyway. Extra windshield washer fluid, but try not to use the wipers. Spare wipers. Air filters for everything, ATV, Boats, Snow machine.

    If it is like normal recent eruptions, you'll have Stinky smelling air and and a thin skiff of ash per day.

    The more interesting question, that no one talks about is: What if we got 3 feet of ash, or 6 feet of ash......No one could drive, fly, boat, sail yes.

    All evacuation would just not work with only one road, and the first truck to break down could not be pushed in the ditch, because of snow storage.

    Help could not come from anywhere, till after heavy rains, or heavy snow.

    The good news is 99% of the time the ash goes up to 30,000 feet plus, and gets deposited around the world via jet stream. But, several feet of ash is possible....it happened to Kodiak, and here on the Kenai Peninsula.

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    Member Bearclaw67's Avatar
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    Hopeak, thanks for those recomendations. This will be a first for me if it happens.
    Paul

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopeak View Post
    Buy a spare air filter for your truck, or maybe two if you do your own maintenance anyway. Extra windshield washer fluid, but try not to use the wipers. Spare wipers. Air filters for everything, ATV, Boats, Snow machine.

    If it is like normal recent eruptions, you'll have Stinky smelling air and and a thin skiff of ash per day.

    The more interesting question, that no one talks about is: What if we got 3 feet of ash, or 6 feet of ash......No one could drive, fly, boat, sail yes.

    All evacuation would just not work with only one road, and the first truck to break down could not be pushed in the ditch, because of snow storage.

    Help could not come from anywhere, till after heavy rains, or heavy snow.

    The good news is 99% of the time the ash goes up to 30,000 feet plus, and gets deposited around the world via jet stream. But, several feet of ash is possible....it happened to Kodiak, and here on the Kenai Peninsula.

    It is very rare for that much ash to come in. Most ash that is even close to that estimate is in the foot range and highest and that is in the mountains.

    I started this thread a couple of days ago:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=46967

    I explain what to do. It seems many have not been thru a volcanic eruption.... cheechakoo's amuk.
    No amount of education can help those who want to remain permanently ignorant of facts, which includes those whom have been educated.

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    I save my old air filters, and if it is going to be fairly bad, I put in an old mostly used up air filter, till it is over. Then switch back to the lightly used one. The best business to be in is car wash or auto parts in a eruption.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    All this air filter stuff is hardly necessary. Air filters are designed to filter out stuff smaller than volcanic ash. They do just fine. After the ashfall is over, take your air filter and blow it out with compressed air from the inside out (make sure you wear goggles & mask). Better to just make sure you're stocked up on food and just hold up in the house until it all blows over. And, since it is winter, drag a garden hose in to thaw out. After the ash fall, use copious water to wash the ash off of vehicles, porches, etc. Brushing or sweeping is a pain and will damage paint finishes.

    If you have a garden, collect up as much of the ash as you can (use large trash cans, etc). In the spring, till it into your garden soil and let it do wonders for your crops.

    You might also consider taking samples for the AVO folks. There are pages at their website on how to properly collect samples for them. Lots of ash samples from many geographic areas helps them study the eruption with greater accuracy.

    And if you bottle up ash in little glass jars and put some fancy "Redoubt Volcanic Ash 2009 Alaska" stickers on them, you can sell them on eBay for a small fortune. (They made a killing off of St. Helens ash and that was long before eBay)
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    All this air filter stuff is hardly necessary. Air filters are designed to filter out stuff smaller than volcanic ash. (They made a killing off of St. Helens ash and that was long before eBay)

    Just because you live in Soldotna... doesn't mean Anchorage/Wasilla/Palmer didn't have to do the same.
    No amount of education can help those who want to remain permanently ignorant of facts, which includes those whom have been educated.

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    No, if you live in Anchorage and don't want to save some ash for the garden, nothing says you have to.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    So address the issue of 24" of ash..... or 41" of ash.

    As to the air filters, if it all bunk, see if you can get a friend to fly his $145,000.00 C-180 right into the ash cloud.

    Me, I trust my Hunting partner who was a diesel mechanic for 35 years. My GMC 5500 cost $57,900.00 and air filters are cheap.

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    If this thing goes off, will it kill the fishing in the area? If so, how long?

    Reason I ask is because have a possible job in the upper Kenai and really don't feel like sitting around if fishing will be shot. I was told it would kill the fishing season.

    Is there anyone around that experience the last time it went off? What happened when it did?

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    Quote Originally Posted by chromage View Post
    If this thing goes off, will it kill the fishing in the area? If so, how long?

    Reason I ask is because have a possible job in the upper Kenai and really don't feel like sitting around if fishing will be shot. I was told it would kill the fishing season.

    Is there anyone around that experience the last time it went off? What happened when it did?
    I don't remember a problem with the fish in lakes or rivers. Might wanna call F&G or D.E.C. and ask them.
    No amount of education can help those who want to remain permanently ignorant of facts, which includes those whom have been educated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hopeak View Post
    As to the air filters, if it all bunk...
    No one said it was "bunk". But the rush to tell everyone to run out and buy 2 air filters for every IC engine they own is not the best use of your $$ and resources right now. A couple weeks after the ashfall is over, yes go ahead and replace the air filter on an engine that you actually used during the ashfall. Or, if the ash was pretty light, just clean it. There is no need to replace the filters on stuff you didn't use (ATVs, lawn mowers, etc.), and since you've got a fair bit of warning, you can save a lot of clean up if you are covering up anything that you don't want contaminated with plastic sheeting or tarps sealed off with duct tape.

    If you don't have to go anywhere and can wait out the ashfall for in your house, then there won't even be reason to replace the air filter on your car. Ash won't be drawn into it unless you run the engine. Pretty simple stuff really.

    A car is no comparison to an airplane in any way, shape, or form. But, if an airplane won't fly through an ash cloud, why would you want to drive in one? Stay home and wait it out.

    By the way... snowmachines do NOT have air filters. Ash mixed with snow will destroy the rear suspension on a snowmachine in short order. So, put away your snowmachines. Tarp them up and never operate a snowmachine while there is ash in the air. Depending on the ash layer, an eruption can quickly end all snowmachine activity for the rest of the season.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    No one said it was "bunk". But the rush to tell everyone to run out and buy 2 air filters for every IC engine they own is not the best use of your $$ and resources right now. A couple weeks after the ashfall is over, yes go ahead and replace the air filter on an engine that you actually used during the ashfall. Or, if the ash was pretty light, just clean it. There is no need to replace the filters on stuff you didn't use (ATVs, lawn mowers, etc.), and since you've got a fair bit of warning, you can save a lot of clean up if you are covering up anything that you don't want contaminated with plastic sheeting or tarps sealed off with duct tape.

    If you don't have to go anywhere and can wait out the ashfall for in your house, then there won't even be reason to replace the air filter on your car. Ash won't be drawn into it unless you run the engine. Pretty simple stuff really.

    A car is no comparison to an airplane in any way, shape, or form. But, if an airplane won't fly through an ash cloud, why would you want to drive in one? Stay home and wait it out.

    By the way... snowmachines do NOT have air filters. Ash mixed with snow will destroy the rear suspension on a snowmachine in short order. So, put away your snowmachines. Tarp them up and never operate a snowmachine while there is ash in the air. Depending on the ash layer, an eruption can quickly end all snowmachine activity for the rest of the season.

    Can I laugh at you for being ignorant? You are more or less saying put a nylon on the air intake on a vehicle. FYI still doesn't work!

    Nice that you haven't had too much Ash to deal with. I just remember the 89-90 blow ups and remember the NICE layer on the roads/homes/vehicles, that were in Anchorage and Vicinity (Palmer, Wasilla, and as far as Portage). Please, Don't give out false information.
    No amount of education can help those who want to remain permanently ignorant of facts, which includes those whom have been educated.

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    1 foot of ash 50 miles from a volcano would be a major event. Pretty rare.

    If you dig down 6-10" into Anchorage top soil you can usually spot a thin layer of dark material. That is what's left of the ash from Mt Spur in the late 40's or early 50's. I think that was about 5" of ash. I remember my parents saying the sky grew completely black and you couldn't see your hand in front of your face. I suspect the power would go out too. Spur is about 80 miles from Anchorage, and Redoubt somewhat farther SSW. Not so far from Kenai though.

    There would need to be a lot of ash to fall to damage fishing in a major way, and most likely it would only happen within a small radius around the volcano. There is usually some acidity related to ash though.

    I was about 40 miles south of St Helens when it blew. Interesting to watch, but we didn't get any ash from the initial blast since it blew farther east. Later eruptions gave us a 1/4 inch or so, and we were told to clean out our car air filters every day while it was flying around. Ash tends to keep getting blown about by cars, so even after the ash stops falling you should tend to those filters. Same thing happened in '89 from Spur. If anything, that's the most likely scenario for Anchorage, with a bit more for the Kenai Peninsula perhaps. But you never know what might happen until it does.

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    Laugh all you want. I didn't say anything about putting a nylon on the air filter. Those kinds of stories really are bunk. If it makes you feel good, replace your air filter as many times as you want. Run down and buy twice as many as you need so everyone else can't even get one.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    By the way... snowmachines do NOT have air filters. Ash mixed with snow will destroy the rear suspension on a snowmachine in short order. So, put away your snowmachines. .
    SAY, What do you call that grey foam that looks like a air filter on all of my Ski-doo's. It be the foam filter looking thingie on the air intake......? In point of FACT my Ski-doo's have TWO air filters, a primary and a secondary filter......

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    The block of foam used on a snowmachine is a "snow screen" to keep large particles of snow dust out of the carbs. It will NOT block volcanic ash.

    Here is a good excerpt from the USGS website on ash precautions about vehicles (note the recommendation to leave your dirty air filter in place):

    Vehicles
    • If possible, avoid driving as ash is harmful to vehicles, the roads may be slippery and driving suspends ash into the air which causes low visibility and may be harmful or irritating to others.
    • If driving is crucial, drive slowly, use headlights and ample windscreen fluid. Using wipers on dry ash may scratch the windscreen. In heavier ashfall driving should only be undertaken in an emergency. Use water bottles and a cloth to clean the windscreen as required, this may be every few tens of metres.
    • Change oil and oil filters frequently (every 50-100 miles in heavy dust; every 500-1000 miles in light dust).
    • Do not drive without an air filter. If you can not change it, clean it by blowing air from the inside out. Do not change it until you notice a loss of power to the engine as a dirty filter is more effective than a clean one.
    • Cleaning your car - clean ash from inside your engine, trunk/boot and spare tyre storage area as well as the seating area. Brushing ash off the car can cause scratching.
    • Have a service garage clean wheel brake assemblies every 50-100 miles for very severe road conditions, or every 200-500 miles for heavy dust conditions. The brake assemblies should be cleaned with compressed air.
    • Have a service garage clean alternators with compressed air after heavy accumulation, every 500 to 1000 miles, or after severe dust exposure.
    • Clean the vehicle, including the engine, radiator, and other essential parts daily, if necessary, using water to flush the ash.
    • Wash the engine compartment with a garden hose or steam cleaner. Be sure to seal off air intakes and electrical components before cleaning.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    The block of foam used on a snowmachine is a "snow screen" to keep large particles of snow dust out of the carbs. It will NOT block volcanic ash.

    Here is a good excerpt from the USGS website on ash precautions about vehicles (note the recommendation to leave your dirty air filter in place):
    [/list]
    You know, it is funny you can say that. You are saying to "Keep them on" when we all know after about a week... you NEED to change them... i.e. why everyone say TWO airfilters. And it isn't exactly healthy on Engines or gas performance... especially since everyone is not too thrilled about 2.39 to 2.64 (per the gas stations prices I saw yesterday).

    Airfilters are also made out of..... wait for it......................................





    Oh ... something made of oil products...... hmm fiber glass and glass???? And in some cases Alumimum, due to older cars. Ever see what sulfuric acid does to aluminum? Not imagine dust with it... hmmmm.

    I asked you in the other forum to stop giving out false information, the USGS give that out as a precaution for those whom have never been in a Eruption having to deal with Ash. I am going to ask you again. Please, don't do it.
    Last edited by Snyd; 01-30-2009 at 17:05. Reason: creative spelling is not allowed. see forum rules
    No amount of education can help those who want to remain permanently ignorant of facts, which includes those whom have been educated.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Strutz View Post
    If you dig down 6-10" into Anchorage top soil you can usually spot a thin layer of dark material. That is what's left of the ash from Mt Spur in the late 40's or early 50's. I think that was about 5" of ash. I remember my parents saying the sky grew completely black and you couldn't see your hand in front of your face. I suspect the power would go out too. Spur is about 80 miles from Anchorage, and Redoubt somewhat farther SSW. Not so far from Kenai though.
    You might find this interesting. I have been using my D-7 to clear some of my land for oats & barley. Well it is hard to hold a good cut with the 12' blade. But as you say there is a layer of grey/white ash that is from the late 1800's here, I understand that one was 12" here. Anyway now it is 3/4" thick and just under the rootsystem, It makes a good depth gage for the cut, as above or below is a rich black loom.

    I think that was the ash fall that sank boats and crushed buildings in Kodiak, Ak.

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