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Thread: Ruger red hawk

  1. #1

    Default Ruger red hawk

    What do you all think about porting a Ruger red hawk? My wife hikes a lot and is having a hard time shooting 320 grain and I cant feel confident about her using it with a good of enough grain built to slow a bear down. Please respond talk to your spouse and see what she thinks.


    JAZZ

  2. #2
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    The only ported handgun I have is a S&W 460V. From my playing with it I don't think porting is your fix, but I could well be wrong. In my 460 shooting 45 Long Colt I canít tell a recoil change when removing the removable compensator. With the high pressure 454 Casull there is a very definite advantage to the compensators porting. I have chickened out of checking the no compensator recoil of a 460 Mag. round as of yet. My theory is that the low pressure loadings don't have the excess gasses to function the porting well. The ports on my 460 are huge and tuned to the high pressures so with a port that is tuned to the lower pressure on her gun it may work.

    Andy

  3. #3
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Best to cut bullet weight or speed.Myself I would cut the speed.

  4. #4

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    Try a 300 grainer at about 1100 fps I doubt more is necessary at close range...

  5. #5
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    Default My advice

    Jazz,

    We need to know some details:

    Quote Originally Posted by jazz View Post
    What do you all think about porting a Ruger red hawk? My wife hikes a lot and is having a hard time shooting 320 grain and I cant feel confident about her using it with a good of enough grain built to slow a bear down. Please respond talk to your spouse and see what she thinks.
    JAZZ
    No one can tell you much about porting effectiveness without

    Cartridge/caliber Barrel length Bullet weight/velocity


    I definitely agree with ADFields about porting being more effective with higher pressure loads. Without the pressure, expect very little effect.

    Muzzle brakes, magna-porting and such come in two varieties. Recoil reducers concentrate on reducing the backward push on the shooter. The magna-port type reduce muzzle rise or "flip". Both increase the noise you will experience, and increase the likelihood of debris in your face. Avoid these muzzle treatments unless you derive enough benefit from them to justfy the inconvenience. And therein lies the rub, and the point of your question, and mine.

    To get a definitive answer, you need two (otherwise) identical guns side-by-side to compare. Since I am curious, too, I will volunteer one of my guns to the comparison if any of them fill the bill (5.5", 7.5" redhawks in 44 mag, 7.5" SRH in 44 mag and 454 Casull) none with any porting. we can split the ammo cost.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oneriver View Post
    Try a 300 grainer at about 1100 fps I doubt more is necessary at close range...
    Quote Originally Posted by Amigo Will View Post
    Best to cut bullet weight or speed.Myself I would cut the speed.
    I suggest a large bullets (and lower speed if recoil is too much). Energy shreds flesh. Momentum breaks bones.

    To get used to the shooting task, I suggest:

    Practice with 200-240 grain loads at 800-900 fps. Practice LOTS! Set up simulated shooting conditions like you would have in contact with a bear. 7 yards, multiple targets and your partner yells which one to shoot first, second and third. Stuff like that, but not from the holster with live ammunition. If you want to practice firing from a holster, use the plastic or wax bulleted practice ammunition.

    If those light loads are too light, move up the scale slowly. Test to see if a flinch is developing often.

    See this thread:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=46874
    especially the post by powerfisher, which does not describe how to cure a flinch, but will detect it vividly.

    A flinch is much easier to prevent than to cure. About 500 times easier.

    Remember. Practice with the light loads. Carry with the heavy loads. Nobody ever flinches with the FIRST shot.

    The foregoing is a lot of opinion, but all it is sincerely held. On the other hand, I am subject to argument and persuasion. On the other hand, these opinions are the result of serious thought and persuasion by people more expert than I am. On the other hand....

  6. #6

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    I'd sooner try a different grip than add porting. RH doesn't have many choices for grips, but Hogue & Pachmayr make decent ones made of rubber or wood that might help with recoil. If you stick with the factory wood grips, T-grips makes an adaptor that makes it easier to hold. A grip that fits your wife's hand well will go a long way to taming recoil.

    Another option is to get a gun with a longer barrel. All else being equal, longer barrel = more weight up front to help absorb recoil. The Super Redhawk has a reputation of being the most shootable .44 around.

    The other guys have given good advice - try different ammo first. My wife isn't in the room right now, but she'd probably agree with me that shooting a bullet you can handle is better than restricting yourself to ammo that's too hot for the user. You might try Garrett Cartridge's "defender" ammo; it's a reduced velocity 310 gr cartridge, but it still packs a punch.

    If all else fails, then magnaporting just might be the way to go. You can easily decide not to like the other options (different grip, bigger gun, different ammo), but putting porting in a gun is permanent. Most comments I've heard have either been that it works & they love it, or it's too noisy/spits lead & they hate it.

    Good luck!
    Tsimshian tribe, wolf clan, the house of Walsk.

  7. #7
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    Noise is good! After shooting it, she won't hear bones crunching.
    The guys are right, just slow the big slug down a little. You lose long range accuracy but that is not what the gun is for anyway.

  8. #8
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Default Practice more often with less power

    I use a RH 5.5 with stock grips. I am not a big tough guy and have small hands so the RH is the best gun for me.

    I practice with cowboy action 44 special rounds or light handloads. This develops my trigger control and sight picture acquirement skills.

    Having been burnt by a buddy and some primer flattening rounds when in my teen years in a SW 44, I have always been suspect of the "bear" rounds like the AK Backpackers. I carried them but had never shot them since I did not want to hurt myself like what happend 25 years ago.

    One day I decided to man up and go plinking with the bear rounds after a box of 44 special and some AE 44 mag JHP. I was surprised to find that the AK Backpacker 300gn gas checks were really easy to shoot. Much easier on my hands than the JHP magnum loads. Those rounds sting like crazy and after 18 of them I am done for the day. I ended up having to stop myself from shooting the last of the AK Backpackers since they were so much fun and went through huge pieces of drift wood like they are nothing.

    When you consider the final needs of the user is to hit a bear with the first and second shots you want them to be able to do that with memorized skills for what ever gun you are using: rifle shotgun or pistol. If there ever is a bear needing some lead treatment, then the shooter's instincts kick in and the recoil is not a factor as long as they have the skills to function the weapon.

    Years ago I took a bear shooting class from Steve Nelson. I shot my company 1895 Marlin in 45-70 and the 870. I left my .44 at home. The target shooting was ok when we did walk up shots and tactical reloads. You get sore from the recoil just like normal target shooting.

    To finish the class Steve has a bear target on a wheeled cart that is pulled by a car at 15mph right at you. You have to get off 3 shots and then reload one round and shoot. Totally friking awesome. What recoil? I just "killed" a charging bear at 3 feet and stepped out of its way as it "died" behind me, so who cares about recoil?

    Of course in reality the bear is going to be coming at you much faster so this shows you that you only get the chance for one shot before the bear is in your lap. Afterward you might no even know how many times you pulled the trigger.

    Make that shot count by practicing a lot with less powerful ammo. The only thing that matters when the time comes is where you make that first round hit on the bear.

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