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Thread: I personally wouldn't...

  1. #1

    Default I personally wouldn't...

    I see the occassional fiberglass boat intentionally left high-n-dry for clamming. I have done it in a metal boat, but wouldn't do it in my fiberglass boat. What about a small rock protruding out among the flat soft stuff, do you worry about that? Anyone else experience this or have a story about it?

  2. #2
    Member Larsenvega's Avatar
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    Default

    I wouldn't want to risk it either. Fiberglass repair is a beast. Like you said, one ill-placed rock and it would be all over. I have more peace of mind just using my Zodiac for shore excursions.

  3. #3
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    Maybe the folks you see have been using the same spot for years, or they checked it out at low tide to see what they were dealing with before beaching. I'm not a beach my boat type of person but if I was I would check it out at low tide first for sure............

  4. #4
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    Default Beached Gillnetters

    We do it all the time. I also regularly let my boat go dry when hunting and clamming. You have to use a little common sense, but it rarely hurts your boat. First, it's good to know the area you're beaching on. If you have the time, take a good look at low tide and find a good spot with no sharp rocks sticking up. Second, It's not such a good thing to do if the wind is whipping around or there are waves bouncing the boat up and down unless you are sure it's a sand or mud bottom. In a rocky area, it's definitely a good weather activity. Third, you want to do it when and where you know the next high tide will lift you off so you won't be stuck for a day or more. And you also want to be sure the tide will lift you high enough so you won't damage your unit if you have one or suck your jet full of junk or rocks if you have a jet, when you are backing off the beach. Common sense goes a long way. Can only post 2 pics at a time, but I'll look for more.
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  5. #5
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    Default High and Dry

    One other thing about letting your boat go dry, say when you're on a deer hunting trip in the Sound, you don't need to worry about it going anyplace, no matter how bad the weather gets. We often find little lagoons or creek mouths that are protected from wind and waves and let our boats go dry while we hunt. Takes looking at the tide book and planning, but many times well worth the effort. Even larger boats can be beached.
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  6. #6

    Default Thanks twodux

    I don't do it all the time but still do it a lot, wasn't sure how to say with smarts it's do-able. helped clean a few bottoms or fix something on boats a few times. Just think of the clams.

  7. #7

    Default

    If I were on a white sands beach -maybe. Any Sea Sport owner's out there tried it? I bet it would heal-over in an ugly way.

  8. #8
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Default Pick your spot

    We have an older bayliner that has been parked on the beach during low tides before. No issues as long as you are careful and follow the recommendations listed above by others.
    BK

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