Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: Glock vs. 1911

  1. #1

    Default Glock vs. 1911

    OK, I know the debate is raging and I have read up a lot on it. My specific requirement is this. I want a personal carry gun that my wife will also be able to operate easily. I would love to get another Kimber (Pro CDP is where I'm leaning), but for my wife's use, I see the Glock as easier to use/less intimidating. I also like the idea of a lot less weight for every day concealed carry. Background is, I'm a rifle guy. I don't shoot handguns much BUT I plan to shoot, shoot, shoot whatever I choose to get and become proficient. My wife hasn't shot and I probably won't get her to shoot a lot. I like the idea of her being able to grab the Glock out of the safe and pull the trigger, not having to worry about the safety etc. Also, a Glock in .40 would be less intimidating for her to shoot than a 4" .45ACP. Any thoughts on things I am missing or maybe just wrong about. My current choice in my mind is either a Glock 23 or a Kimber Pro CDP. I will also be putting laser sights on which ever one I choose.
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  2. #2
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    The ultra reliability of the grab and shoot tupperware of handguns is actually a very good idea when offering one for the gadgetry challenged.

    I think there is some much validity to a smooth, no levers, no buttons, light weight reliable piece of equipment to stuff under a shirt or under a pillow. Other than that, I think the Kimber CDP is a very good 1911 and of course I think the 1911 is it.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer Ak
    Posts
    37

    Default Glock vs 1911

    I agree with Murphy on the slip it out and its ready.
    I am a 1911 fan, but had a Glock 23 for a few years.
    My 5 inch Kimber has less felt recoil than my model 23 Glock in .40.
    I just finished a cc class this weekend.
    One of the fellows giving the class had a glock that had a bullet lodged in the barel
    and fired another.
    That Glock frame exploded...no info on the users hand, but I will never own another after seeing that.
    A 1911 won't do that...CDP all the way.
    Good luck.
    Bill

  4. #4

    Default Kimbers

    Who has Kimbers in stock around Anchorage?
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    78

    Default

    It sounds like what blew up that Glock was a squib round, which is where there is a problem with the round (usually not enough powder) that causes the bullet to go forward and lodge in the barrel. When a second round is fired it causes the firearm to blow up. As a shooter, you should always be on the look out for this. Usually the noise is different (much softer).
    This is an ammunition problem and can happen to any firearm, including the 1911. It is preventable.

    Other than that, I have no opinion. Glocks and 1911s are both excellent handguns and the choice is all personal preference. In my opinion, the Glock is more user friendly to novices and more rugged. I think the 1911 requires more training and more attention to malfunction drills. If it is for your wife, let her go and handle both of them and make the choice herself. You might also consider a Glock 20 or 29 in 10mm. The grip size of the 20 is likely too big for your wife, but the 29 is a good size for concealment. My wife shoots a G29 very well. It can be loaded down to .40 levels or it can be loaded very hot, so there is a lot of versatility there.

  6. #6
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ak Willy View Post
    One of the fellows giving the class had a glock that had a bullet lodged in the barel
    and fired another.
    That Glock frame exploded...no info on the users hand, but I will never own another after seeing that.
    A 1911 won't do that...CDP all the way.
    Good luck.
    Bill
    Any gun is likely gonna be done fore from that, even a 1911. I have been there when 3 guns have had this happen, including a 1911.

    One was a Colt police .38 special and it bulged the barrel so bad it split the frame at the barrel threads.

    The most spectacular and frightening was an M1 of my Dads, when the smoke and dust cleared the biggest part we found was a chunk of wood about 8X3X2 with the but plate on it. The ole man still has what we could find of it in a case, he got some scratches and ringing eras out of it.

    The 1911 blew the barrel and slide off of the frame and ruined them as well as the frame.

    All three guns were as good as gone, rendered to scrap iron in a flash.
    All three shooters were shook up but only had minor injuries. They were lucky, my Dad the most lucky of all.


    Andy

  7. #7
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Question Glock or 1911?

    Just so you know, I hate plastic guns . . . but as a pure tool to use and beet on I don't think you can do better than a Glock! They are not my style and the Kimber is, but my wife would be lost using a 1911 under stress.

    I got my wife a Lady Smith 357 and she likes a bunch. Ask her to clear a 1911 and she will do fine but take five minutes at it. Hand her an empty auto and a clip and she will almost always forget to work the slide. She knows how to do it but won’t shoot an auto enough to get proficient and comfortable with it. She shoots the heck out of that little Lady Smith 357 using 357 loads even, I never would have believed she could take the recoil. She also likes to have a hammer on her long guns so she has no safety to mess with and can see if it’s set to fire or not.

    I would say talk to your wife and have her handle a lot of guns. Then listen to her input when thinking about a gun you think her life may depend on her using some day.

    Andy

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    78

    Default

    She shoots the heck out of that little Lady Smith 357 using 357 loads even
    You know my wife is the same way. When she got here carry license, I bought her a Glock 17. It took me a couple of weeks to get her used to it before she could shoot competently.

    Because of the way she carries, I recently urged her to try a combination of a S&W 66 4" (hip carry) and a magna-ported Ruger Speed Six with a 3" barrel and bobbed hammer (purse holster carry). We went out to the range and she tore the center out of the target on double action with both of them, having never handled a DA revolver before!

    So I learned my lesson, do what you can to let others handle as many firearms as possible, and let them choose what works best for them. She still likes the Glock, but strongly prefers the revolver.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    East Tennessee
    Posts
    78

    Default

    I went the other way, from G21 to M1911. With flat mainspring housing the 1911 fits my hand much better and I most definitely wanted a manual safety after stuffing the cocked Glock into my holster dozens of times when taking Massad Ayoob's Stressfire course back in '99. Also I find the .45acp is easier to shoot than the .40S&W. The 40 snaps my wrist more than the 45. JMO!

  10. #10
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ak Willy View Post
    I agree with Murphy on the slip it out and its ready.
    I am a 1911 fan, but had a Glock 23 for a few years.
    My 5 inch Kimber has less felt recoil than my model 23 Glock in .40.
    I just finished a cc class this weekend.
    One of the fellows giving the class had a glock that had a bullet lodged in the barel
    and fired another.
    That Glock frame exploded...no info on the users hand, but I will never own another after seeing that.
    A 1911 won't do that...CDP all the way.
    Good luck.
    Bill

    i like (and use) both guns.......but empirical data shows the glock way more durable and reliable.

    it may surprise you to learn that the military durability standard for the beretta pistol is only 2m rounds (?). is that enough?

    while at the ruger factory in newport nh, i observed a ruger with six bullets lodged in a barrel. the gun didn't "blow up" (lucky for the shooter) but that alone won't determine what gun i carry.

    a pistol for defensive use is best left to the shooter to decide, based on successful employment of the weapon. shoot both and decide.

    happy trails.
    jh

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    931

    Lightbulb Hope this helps some -

    Quote Originally Posted by blackfoot View Post
    ok, i know the debate is raging and i have read up a lot on it. My specific requirement is this. I want a personal carry gun that my wife will also be able to operate easily.

    *****This is likely 2 different handguns --- for your requirements vs. Her needs & not really a debate of glock vs. 1911... Besides - you would also need to pit one certain model against another. That makes for some shopping around, trial/error, or hopefully opportunities to try if possible.

    I would love to get another kimber (pro cdp is where i'm leaning), but for my wife's use, i see the glock as easier to use/less intimidating. I also like the idea of a lot less weight for every day concealed carry.

    *****With these given makes/models --- i'd have to (i think) agree w/ what you are saying here... Operating simplicity can instill valuable confidence by being less intimidating, for the most part may be less confusing, more straightforward using sort of gross muscle memory/motor skills, and so on --- only if the make and model fit, can be controlled, and the person can manipulate all fire/function controls in proper sequences in a time-efficient fashion.

    Background is, i'm a rifle guy. I don't shoot handguns much but i plan to shoot, shoot, shoot whatever i choose to get and become proficient.

    *****Both glock & 1911 pistols will be suitable... I'd give the nod to the glock:
    1.) safe action design is simple, reliable, durable, and likely the most cost effective piece of auto pistol engineering out there.
    2.) capacity
    3.) easy to maintain
    4.) weather proof
    5.) availability, price, quality control, & reputation

    my wife hasn't shot and i probably won't get her to shoot a lot.

    *****It would be cool to get her out shooting... But you may have already arrived at a pretty certain conclusion . Lots of folks in this same boat. You'll just have to see. You said your a rifle guy so chances are you'll stay one vs. Primarily practicing handgunning.

    I like the idea of her being able to grab the glock out of the safe and pull the trigger, not having to worry about the safety etc.

    *****In this 'case' (pulling it from a safe) the glock is the same as the 1911 cocked/unlocked

    also, a glock in .40 would be less intimidating for her to shoot than a 4" .45acp. Any thoughts on things i am missing or maybe just wrong about.

    *****The glock in .40 s&w would actually be my first choice!!! Smaller gun, smaller grip, good capacity/penetration/fight-stopper, more controllable, just as reliable. Maybe a little less expensive?

    My current choice in my mind is either a glock 23 or a kimber pro cdp. I will also be putting laser sights on which ever one i choose.
    *****good choices... Don't leave out some of the very suitable revolvers!!!
    If i had to make the best of the two outta the box (glock or kimber pro cdp) i'd go the glock every time based on the knowledge that you get exactly what you paid for and reputably more reliable w/ no hype vs. Something that's a bit overrated as well as overpriced for its given class & model.

    Hope this helps some -

  12. #12

    Smile both of them...

    I like them both. Ultimately it depends on the shooter. Several high speed "swat style" teams use the 1911 pistol in .45 caliber. It dominates the shooting games and has a wonderful record as far as fighting hand guns go. I have also watched some shooters shoot a Glock extremely well. I like the Glock 36 I keep in my truck. I can pick it up and shoot it in the winter with gloves on with no problem. The plastic grip is not as cold to my bare hands as my 1911 is. Being a good pistol shot takes dedication. Either one will serve you well for self defense if you do your part.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Texas (I miss AK)
    Posts
    174

    Default

    Hard to beat the Glock for the money. I love 1911's. I learned to shoot a handgun with a 1911 and I own 2. I own 3 Glocks and plan on getting more. A good 1911 can be tuned to be reliable, but still I don't see them as being as reliable as a Glock.

  14. #14
    Member BigHinER's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Colorado til I can get back to 'Laska.
    Posts
    261

    Default

    Not knocking Glocks or 1911s since I just bought a 1911-A1 but if it's gonna be her gun why not take her to a gun shop and let her pick one out (as long as it isn't pink) and get a "feel" for what fits her hand and she is comfortable with? Never mind, I just re read your post and saw you wanted a carry weapon. In that case I would go with a Glock.

    H
    Originally Posted by BIGBOB
    Estimate of time of death appears to be same day he died.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    There is a lot to "what gun to choose", and a lot of it is an individual choice. Many of the issues deal with how much time you will put into practice. You say you will put in the time and as such can shoot any thing you want that is reliable and has enough power. Your wife is another story as she is not going to put in the necessary time to be able to operate a complicated weapon in a high stress situation. You can probably learn to shoot any thing she chooses but she may not learn the more complicated pistol well enough to be proficient in a high stress moment. Glocks and 1911s can both be very reliable but I have seen malfunctions with both and then you get to do a malfunction drill. That means a few more hours of practice to be able to perform under stress. The other choice is a revolver. Almost 100% reliable, still ammo issues, just point and shoot. If you get a fail to fire, just pull the trigger again. Oh, To RGL01, the Glock isn't fully cocked until the trigger is pulled. So, holstering a glock won't be a problem if you keep your finger off the trigger while holstering. I recommend revolvers for those that won't take the time to learn an auto. But, as others have said let her pick what feels good to her and that she can shoot well. If you can't get one for you then learn to shoot hers.

  16. #16

    Default

    Mine was terrified of guns when we met. Started her on .22 then 204 rifle. She loves the .204.. bought her a smith 37 which she loves. Now she's moving up to a glock 23. If your very profecient, a 1911 is a fine gun but there are many things that can go wrong if you don't shoot and practice alot. I prefer the glock for PP because all you only really have to remember to do is pull the trigger.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,448

    Default

    The 1911 is a gift from God revealed to mankind through devine inspiration as revealed to John Moses Browning from above. The 1911 is a timeless pistol that will be around long after any of us reading this! Its 100 yrs old and still gaining in popularity

  18. #18

    Default

    Glock and 1911 are both great guns and in the hands of an experienced user either is a fine choice. In the hands of a wife who rarely if ever picks one up and would be expected to work them safely in a panic situation neither is a good choice. The problem with both is that it's too easy to pull the trigger in a stress situation when you don't mean to. Something with a hammer fully down and a long trigger pull is the ticket for a wife with no interest. If the wife is a gun type and uses them often then no worries.

  19. #19

    Default Most times I just read and stalk but....

    regarding the subject matter of this thread, I feel I do have standing to make a contribution.

    But before doing so I feel the need to qualify my position and level of experience regarding the subject matter. I'm just approaching that 50 year old point in life, been around just about long enough to know that I don't know everything, maybe just long enough to have learned a thing or two.

    Been shooting/handling firearms since my teens and carried one as a law man (both local uniformed and Federal Agent) for the past 30 years. Past ten plus years have been as a Firearms Instructor for the fed agency I work for. That position has exposed me to shooting with, observing and training many types of people of all sizes. Most importantly to this thread many of those people I've trained have been women who started out thier career in law enforcement without ever having held a firearm. As the agency has progressed I've trained people in several types of handguns. Done the revolver thing, double action only Sig 228, Glock 23 (40 cal) to name a few. I've personally carried a Kimber 1911 and a Sig 220 .45 auto, which is a single stack mag, carried a Para-Ordinance double stack 45 auto which is a fat 1911. I am a certified Glock Armour. And for a my retirement years I personally have chosen the Glock 30 45 auto and had it Mag-na-ported. That gun will be buried with me some day in the coffin.

    So, what have I learned that might be of pertinence to this thread. Couple things actually. First, a single stack magazine requires substantially different street tactics than that of a double stack magazine. I've participated and taught many Hogan's Alley training environments, interior versions of Hogan's Alleys, done the Simunitions training (a type of Paint-ball course that affords non-lethal live fire training) and can fully attest to the fact that single stack magazines require a much greater attention to counting rounds during the stress of a gun fight than do double stackers. A shooter needs to be constantly aware of the Tactical Magazine swap or run the risk of shooting dry. That one issue dictates tactics, influences the thought process and risk management decisions that are required to win gun fights.

    Second, the original poster was basically asking the question of what would be a handgun that his minimally experienced spouse could use, achieve some level of competency with a minimal amount of trigger time, and still obtain proficiency. I submit the 1911 as a single action handgun is not the best choice for that application. Manually pulling the hammer back takes far too much precious time. Cocked and locked requires a person to do "something" to make the gun fire. That "something" is called a fine motor function and in times of stress, (like engaging in a gunfight) fine motor skills are first to disapate from the body. For the inexperienced shooter you'll want point a shoot capability. That means double action on at least the first round. No "something" required, except to pull back on the trigger.

    The Glock Action Trigger affords the same pull of the trigger on the first round, thoughout the magazine and to the last round. This consistency aids the new shooter and affords a quicker development of confidence. The trigger pull is designed such that, with proper training it is possible to accurately rapid fire with 7-8 pieces of brass in the air at one time. Obviously this technique is directed toward the advanced shooter but certainly combat accuracy is achievable at this rapid speed.

    Tupperware guns, water pistols, all the other enduring names the nay-sayers have toward the Glock handgun tend to slander the lethality of the Glock. Granted the Glock will never approach the beautiful workmanship of the Colt 1911 or the silky smooth trigger of the Kimber. It's not designed to. It's not built with the attention to hand-fitting detail that the machined 1911 is built with. I personally can admire the look and feel of a finely built, highly detailed weapon but that does not mean it has to be finely detailed to excel in a gun fight. The Glock is designed to win gun fights. (period)

    Some Glock features/issues folks might not be aware of:

    Tenifer Coating: The black film that coats the weapon surface, resistent to rust, nearly as hard as Diamond. Not just blueing.

    Polymer Frame: Plastic does not rust folks.

    Trigger Groups: Ability to swap internal parts to modify the trigger pull without significant hand honing / fitting of components.

    Interchangability of magazines and barrels, within certain groups of Glock Models.
    Yea though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil, for the shadow is mine and so is the valley. Thy Glock and thy M14 comfort me in days of civil unrest and terror

  20. #20
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    Great Great Post there Ex1811! I think you hit on some really good points and it seems that you have the background to callem as you see them.

    I have no experience in gunfights or tactical training nor am I deeply involved with both types of guns, I do own both however. But your info really brought to light some important differences to a guy who might be on the fence with these paticular models.

    Thanks!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •