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Thread: Predator Hunting

  1. #1

    Default Predator Hunting

    Was looking for some info. on hunting fox and lnyx with calls. Is it a good way to hunt or is the sit and wait game better? Also I was reading the regs. and the way I understand them is that all you next is a hunting lic. to shoot a fox and/or lynx or do you need a trapping lic as well? Thanks again for all the info. Sometimes it is alot to understand!!

    Marky

  2. #2

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    I have taken up predator hunting for about a year now. Here is some of the gear I use. I have a Stevens 200 .223 with a Burris 3-9. I have many different hand calls, but there are three in particular that are on my lanyard. I have a wood wise bite and howl, a primos ki-yi, and Sceery raspy cottontail. I also have two sets of camo for whichever season I may be calling in. The first is a mossy oak breakup and the second is a mossy oak winter camo with white bottoms.

    I am no expert and I have yet to take my first predator, but this is the first season I am really serious about it. I have read a lot of material on the subject and some books as well, anyways I hope this helps.

    Fox, lynx, coyote, wolf, wolverine, and the elusive pika can be taken with just a hunting license. I mainly hunt coyote and fox, but marmot, marten, mink, muskrat, river otter and weasels have to be taken with a trappers license. A trapping license is only $15, so it may be worth the expense.

    This is how I hunt and setup a stand. I find an area with signs of predators, may it be tracks, scat or howls. I do my best to find an area where the sun is to my back, wind in my face (crosswinds too), and where I think the animal will come from. I make my way to my stand a quiet as possible, then I sit for around 10 minutes while the area settles down and I become familiar with the terrain.

    I call in internals from 30 seconds up to a minute or two. In between calls I will keep my eye out for any takers looking for dinner. If I have no furry creatures looking for dinner I will leave after 30-45 minutes. My first set of coyotes I called in two around that 30-45 minute time period. I was about to leave when my brother spotted them darting over a hill towards us. When I am ready to leave I take off as quiet as possible.

    I have called in takers but I had a few disadvantages that lead to me leaving empty handed. Learning experiences to say the least.

    If you are in the Anchorage area lets get together sometime and hunt some preds.

  3. #3

    Default Predator Hunting

    "I have called in takers but I had a few disadvantages that lead to me leaving empty handed. Learning experiences to say the least."

    Care to expand on that? Best of luck this season nonetheless.

    Marky, while I have yet to specifically predator hunt in Alaska, I would say calling would offer a better chance. With all the open space to roam and comparatively low densities of wildlife, the "sit and wait" method may prove to be less than exhilarating. Unless of course you are sitting and waiting for a moose or something and Mr. Fox happens by...

  4. #4

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    The sun was going down and I was just about out of light, but I could see the animals with my naked eye. But I was using a leapers scope on an SK and I couldnt see them through the scope. They also stopped behind some thick brush with just their head and neck showing, they were hung up and did not want to come any further. This is why I did not use the open sights, it would have been a tough 100 yard shot. The sun eventually ran out of light and it was pitch black.

  5. #5
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    Calling is by far the best way to go for predators. I have been doing it out here since I moved out here in 1986. If you can afford a good electronic call like a FoxPro go for it. You can have several different calls preloaded into it. It also best to have a trapping license. With a hunting license you have bag limits, with a trapping license you don't with the exception of some Units and that is mainly Beaver. As you will see in the regulations some furbearers are listed as fur animals or big game. Wolf and Wolverine are considered as big game also.

  6. #6
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I would seriously look at calling by moonlight. I haven't done it myself, but my brother is way more successful with fox when he is calling under the glow of a full moon.

    -Brian

  7. #7
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    Buy a trapping license and check the regs...spotlights are legal in many area as well..fox, coyote, and lynx ( I think) can be "trapped" with firearms. combine that with an e-call and decoy.......boom/whop!

    Some Federal land managers do not allow t he use of spotlights however. so please check the regs closely.

  8. #8
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    With an electronic call, especially one with a remote control you can set it up away from where you are sitting. 50-75 yards is a good distance.

    If using either hand held or electronic calls you can also get a Ptarmagin wing and set it up away from you in some bushes. Tie a string to the wing and if a predator comes within sight of it just pull on the wing a little bit. Normally if you are in a spot and something doesn't show up within 15-20 minutes, move to another spot. It doesn't have too be very far away from the spot you were just calling from either. I have sat in a spot calling for 30 minutes and then moved to another spot about 100 yards away and had five fox come in at the same time.

  9. #9
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
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    expect alot of educated critters along our road system. I have been going at it for a few years. I have called in some animals but the situation was over to quick or what have you to get a shot in. But you can go a long time between succesful calling sessions.

    Im gonna try a snowmachine this year to get off the road a bit.

    The foxpro with remote and a decoy is the way to go I think. That wood pecker in distress call is a good one.

    And yeah, night time with a spotlight is the best time. Getting a trapping license though so you will be legal in doing it.

    Last but not least, cover scent!, cover scent! I like the red fox urine the best.

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