Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: made a short starter today

  1. #1
    Member aknewbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ft. Richardson
    Posts
    175

    Default made a short starter today

    I had a little time to myself today, so I got busy doing a project I've wanted to do for a long time- make my own short starter. I used a an 8 ball and an old brass punch. The punch had a knurled handle, so i used my trusty lathe (a cordless drill and a couple of good files) and smoothed out all of the knurling. Then I cut off half of the punch tip for the nib, took a 3/8" drill bit and drilled into that and the handle end of the punch. A little emry paper and lapping with a .570 roundball covered with sandpaper, drill 2 holes, a little epoxy and voila!!!! I know that it isnt a big project, but I am gonna keep trying to make as much of my own stuff as possible.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Member Warhorse's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    78

    Default Nice

    Looks really nice, kind of heavy though isn't it?

    "I won't be wronged, I won't be insulted, and I won't be laid a hand on. I don't do these things to other people and I require the same from them." John Wayne

  3. #3
    Member aknewbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ft. Richardson
    Posts
    175

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Warhorse View Post
    Looks really nice, kind of heavy though isn't it?

    Yeah, it is just for the range. I have a light little plastic one I carry when I'm hunting.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aknewbie View Post
    I had a little time to myself today, so I got busy doing a project I've wanted to do for a long time- make my own short starter. I used a an 8 ball and an old brass punch. The punch had a knurled handle, so i used my trusty lathe (a cordless drill and a couple of good files) and smoothed out all of the knurling. Then I cut off half of the punch tip for the nib, took a 3/8" drill bit and drilled into that and the handle end of the punch. A little emry paper and lapping with a .570 roundball covered with sandpaper, drill 2 holes, a little epoxy and voila!!!! I know that it isnt a big project, but I am gonna keep trying to make as much of my own stuff as possible.
    Whoa, is that ever a unique idea. Great! Traditionalists will moan, but they never worry me too much. I'm a fan of original thinking. Really fine "lathe" work too!

    Gotta watch the itch to make things yourself though. It's a SERIOUS addiction. I made verything I hunted with this year except powder caps and the fabric in my patches. Sure felt good. I'm looking foward to the other things you make now that the bug is under your skin! This is a heck of a start.

  5. #5

    Default

    I had the same idea a few days ago, the short starter that is , not the 8 ball. I plan to make a short starter out of a bit of moose antler in more of a "T" handle configuration.

    Then I figured I would make a powder horn, and a sling for my rifle, and a possibles bag so on...

    This all started after I visited Black Elk Leather to buy a pattern for making a otter fur hat.

    You are exactly right Brownbear, it is addictive. My "cave" will soon be overflowing as I have a fly tying bench, a smokeless powder reloading bench, computer desk and soon to add, leather working bench.

    And I still have to rebuild my motorcycle.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 338WM View Post
    I had the same idea a few days ago, the short starter that is , not the 8 ball. I plan to make a short starter out of a bit of moose antler in more of a "T" handle configuration.

    Then I figured I would make a powder horn, and a sling for my rifle, and a possibles bag so on...

    This all started after I visited Black Elk Leather to buy a pattern for making a otter fur hat.

    You are exactly right Brownbear, it is addictive. My "cave" will soon be overflowing as I have a fly tying bench, a smokeless powder reloading bench, computer desk and soon to add, leather working bench.

    And I still have to rebuild my motorcycle.
    Kindred spirit here!

    Before resorting to the motorcycle, don't forget to build loading blocks, a knife or three, and at least one rifle kit. Careful about looking up the terms "card weaving" or "inkel loom", cuzz next thing you know you'll be weaving your own belts and straps.

    Gotta love Black Elk. I prefer walking through there on my rare trips to The City to ordering from them, just cuzz their catalog is pretty rough and hard to use. Though I prefer shopping with independents rather than chains, I've been ordering lately from The Tandy Store because it's easier. Really nice folks. The Tandy web site is really good. Lots of leathers are used for making bags, but I've become well acquainted and fond of Tandy's Deertand for possibles bags. Just the right cross between soft, cheap and thick. Lots cheaper than elk (usually less than half the price), though it resembles it in thickness and texture. It doesn't make noise scraping through the brush like veg tanned, and it shapes well to your body with unlined bags. Glue pillow ticking to the inside before assembling, and it stiffens up nicely while still being quiet in the brush. Another great source of leather is leather clothing at thrift stores and yard sales. It's so soft and thin that you have to line it, but I'm yet to pay more than $5 for a coat big enough to make a couple of bags.

  7. #7
    Member rimfirematt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Eagle River
    Posts
    2,133

    Default

    I like it! thats the cool thing about Muzzleloaders. You really can make your own stuff outta whats available. Thats the way the frontiersman wouldve done it!

    I needed a lead shot dispenser yesterday and got to looking around the house and found me a contact solution bottle. I just cut the little spout back enough to let the shot through and stuck a bolt through it to cap it.
    Worked great! And best of all free! I would like to eventually get me one of those nice shot snakes that sell for 100 bucks but for now I like my little home-made job

  8. #8
    Member aknewbie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ft. Richardson
    Posts
    175

    Default

    [quote=BrownBear;420070]Kindred spirit here!

    Before resorting to the motorcycle, don't forget to build loading blocks, a knife or three, and at least one rifle kit. Careful about looking up the terms "card weaving" or "inkel loom", cuzz next thing you know you'll be weaving your own belts and straps.


    Well, I have a knife done and I am gonna make a couple of loading blocks as soon as I get some better lumber, all I have on hand is plywood.

    Do you get patterns for your bossibles bags, or do you just wing it? I have an old leather coat I havent worn since I was in high school I can use.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aknewbie View Post
    Do you get patterns for your bossibles bags, or do you just wing it? I have an old leather coat I havent worn since I was in high school I can use.
    I wing it on some, but for most I started with the basic fowler bag pattern here. You might have to register to get to that page, but it's free. The fowler bag as-is comes out a little small for my taste, so I expanded the pattern to make it an inch taller and two inches wider. Then I sometimes add a gusset. After the very first one I made, I did away with the two-piece flap and made it a single unit. Not as fancy, but sure easier.

    I've recently enlarged the pouch another step to make it 11 inches wide and 9 high, then added a 4" gusset. That's way big for a possibles bag, but just perfect for a camera bag. Holds a couple of lenses and a strobe, along with a few extra small things. No ambition to put a camera body in there, but it beats the heck out of any other camera bags my wife and I have used. I've made 4 in the last couple of weeks, and I'm just working on the carry strap to finish #5. You never know how many friends you have till you appear with something that makes sense, looks good, and works well. I have no ambition to make bags and sell them, but dang if I'm not going to start asking folks to reimburse me for the parts! I went through a whole side of Deertand in turning out the four.

    I've used pillow ticking and other fabrics (100% cotton) for glued-in liners on most recent bags. Just makes them a little stiffer, which works better. The trick is to wash and dry the ticking first before you glue it in. My wife didn't want a fabric liner in her camera bag, so I picked up a hide of dyed pigskin liner from Tandy. Really cheap at around $1.50 a foot and 7 square feet overall. There's enough there for around two bags. It looks really sharp in a camera bag, but pillow ticking is more traditional for possibles bags.

    I have used Barge rubber cement for all my leatherwork in the past, but I tried Tandy's water based contact (latex) cement recently. Wow! Is it ever good stuff, but it smells like latex house paint rathern that toluene, so I'm making points with my wife. I've pretty much switched to Tandy water based dyes, finishes and cements to get around the hazmat restrictions in checked baggage or freight. And all I have tried are excellent. Here is the contact cement. It comes in 4 oz bottles, quarts and gallons. I've started using it for lots more than leather work, and I'm over half way through a quart in a couple of weeks. Looks like I'll be buying a gallon next time!!!!

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    salt lake city ut
    Posts
    409

    Default nice work

    ive been in the machine shop industry for 17 years and i can say youre quality is good for a drill lathe better than some guys who have 6000 lb lathes could do good job AK

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •