Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: question for the "gun guys"

  1. #1

    Default question for the "gun guys"

    Ok recently I was told that I was not a gun guy because I did not go look up some ballistics. Ok, I will accept that if those same can tell me what a free floating action is.

    I was set up at a gun show today and the table behind me is talking with a person about a free floating action. What the heck is a free floating action?

  2. #2
    Member moose-head's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    @ Seminary, Dubuque Ia
    Posts
    839

    Default

    Well Duuuuh; it's an action that floats freely (other than that I don't know).

  3. #3
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    Someone either misspoke or doesn't know what they're talking about. There is no such thing as a free-floating action. The action is anchored to the stock.

    However, the term does apply to barrels and basically means that there is enough clearance in the barrel channel (usually $1 bill thickness) that the stock doesn't touch the barrel along its length.
    Now what ?

  4. #4
    Member moose-head's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    @ Seminary, Dubuque Ia
    Posts
    839

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by stevelyn View Post
    However, the term does apply to barrels and basically means that there is enough clearance in the barrel channel (usually $1 bill thickness) that the stock doesn't touch the barrel along its length.
    Forgive the noobnes of my question, but don't they all do that?

  5. #5
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    I believe the Barrett auto loading 50BMG is a free floating action. The action and barrel move back inside the stock when fired, then barrel rebounds. The bolt is trapped at the back till the barrel rebounds, after the barrel is in the forward position the bolt is allowed to close and takes a round into the chamber as it does. Over simplified description here but should give you the idea. I am not sure if the official name is floating action but that is what I have often heard it called.

    Andy

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    I've always thought it was "free-floated" vs bedded" (barrel), and "nonbedded vs bedded" (action).

    Bedding involves application of a viscous compound in the action and/or barrel channel of the stock, refitting the barreled action to the stock, and allowing it to harden...thus creating a snug fitting bed for the action and/or barrel. (It's actually more involved than that, but that's the short version).

    Then you also have a barrel that is neither bedded nor free-floated, but instead has a pressure point at the forend which contacts the barrel.

    Right?

    Doc

  7. #7
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moose-head View Post
    Forgive the noobnes of my question, but don't they all do that?
    No. As Doc states there are rifles that have a pressure point on the barrel at the end of the stock. They free-float for the most part, but the pressure point is there to change the barrel harmonics as it may not have shot as well totally free-floated.

    Also rifles with Mannlicher style stocks are impossible to free-float since the barrel is enclosed in the stock for it's full length and anchored with a metal cap at the muzzle.

    Then there are rifles where both the action and the barrel has been full-length bedded in the stock.

    Noobness forgiven.
    Now what ?

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Missoula, MT
    Posts
    448

    Default

    At one time a number of bench rest shooters did in fact float the action and the barrel was epoxidied into the barrel channel of a fibre glass stock. Obviously it had to be a low recoiling round like 222 or similar. I do not know if it is still popular. J.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    301

    Default

    At one time a number of bench rest shooters did in fact float the action and the barrel was epoxidied into the barrel channel of a fibre glass stock. Obviously it had to be a low recoiling round like 222 or similar. I do not know if it is still popular. J.
    That is still done. Though usually with the aid of a aluminum block the bottom of which is epoxied to the stock and the top clamps on to it, clamping the barrel between. Many seem to say a lot of bad things about the looks of such setups but they have a reputation for shooting good. I was told that they are not allowed is some bench rest competitions.

    To me the Idea makes a lot of sense. You get a stiffer barrel for the same weight, and on a front locking action it would let you make the action very very light back of the locking lugs. Seems like the ideal way to make a light weight rifle, especially if it is to be setup with a scout type scope.

  10. #10

    Default

    ok, I will admit i was screwing with some of the smart arses. I bought a .22 LR that has a free floating action. The barrel is about 1.5" in diameter and is attatched to a break open action and now resembles a falling block. When I bring it home on Sunday afternoon I will post some pictures of it.

  11. #11

    Default

    here is a picture with the action opened.

    http://i425.photobucket.com/albums/p...h/DCP_9428.jpg

  12. #12

  13. #13
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    Never saw one of those before. How is it secured to the stock?
    Now what ?

  14. #14

    Default

    the barrel is epoxied to the stock. The guy that built it used to shoot 50 yard bench rest with it. It is a tack driving son of a gun.

  15. #15
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairbanksan in Aleutian Hell
    Posts
    1,316

    Default

    I stand corrected.
    Now what ?

  16. #16
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    I would call that a brake action. It is odd with the solid stock like that but works the same way as if the stock was a two piece. Take a brake action and replace the fore stock with a one piece stock, hollow out the breach part of the new stock and there it is.

    Andy

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    I would call that a brake action. It is odd with the solid stock like that but works the same way as if the stock was a two piece. Take a brake action and replace the fore stock with a one piece stock, hollow out the breach part of the new stock and there it is.

    Andy
    if it was a two piece stock then it would not be a free floating action.

  18. #18
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by klickitat View Post
    if it was a two piece stock then it would not be a free floating action.
    So if I take the but stock off a brake action and glue the guts of the for stock inside a one piece, then all the sudden it's a floating action? I don’t see when the action class got changed.

    Andy

  19. #19

    Default

    I must ohave misunderstood what you were trying to say.

    A free floating action can be any type of action as long as it is floating on the barrel and is not attatched to any stock.

  20. #20

    Default

    My Ruger 10/22 has a bedding block on the bottom of barrel, which is secured to the stock. The stock is relieved all around the receiver. I consider this a free floating action. Many accuracy test barrels are secured to a bench rest by the barrel, the action/receiver hangs off the chamber end of the barrel. Hope that helps.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •