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Thread: Dickenson Boat Heater

  1. #1
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Default Dickenson Boat Heater

    I've been looking at quite a few heaters for my 240 Alaskan. Has anyone had any experience with a Dickenson Propane P-9000 or P-12000 heater. I emailed the tech at Dickenson about condensation problems and they replied back with this.

    "This propane heater fireplace has a closed firebox with direct draft chimney so no byproducts are in the air. It works like a furnace much like the kind in your home so will not cause condensation"

    Heater looks nice and efficient, clean burning and very reasonable in price.

    Looking for feed back from you guys/gals.

    Mark

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    New member fishnhuntr's Avatar
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    Talk to Steve the potbuilder on this site, he has experience with them. Not sure what model but he seems to really like his.

    Cody

  3. #3

    Default Boat Heating Systems

    Propane is pretty explosive if you have even small leaks. Lots of bouncing around . Most boat manufacturers avoid using propane for boat heating. Diesel is safer and there are some good heaters on the market. I have an Espar in mine and Toyo makes an excellent one that is easy to install.

    Denny
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    Default heat

    There are 4 of the 9000's in our group. The oldest, about 6years now , is mine. I would definitly get the 12000, if you get the dickenson. But, a friend had the Toyo cabin heater. Its diesel, but my next heater will be the Toyo. Thermostatic controlled, way more than enuf heat even for winter king fishing in Homer. And you can mount it easily up front where you need the heat.

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    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fishnhuntr View Post
    Talk to Steve the potbuilder on this site, he has experience with them. Not sure what model but he seems to really like his.

    Cody
    Hi Cody,
    My stove runs on diesel, its a Bristol model . Lots of guys in the gillnet fleet have those propane dickinsons, haven't heard any bad about them.

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    Dtol has a good point. Propane is a pain to deal with. Your constantly dealing with tanks and such and its expensive. Not to mention explosive. Diesel sounds like the way to go. From what is sounds like you can get a diesel stove that puts out plenty of heat and if you run into a leak you don't have to worry about your boat blowing up.

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    I bought a 12000, and will be installing it shortly in my 26' short cabin hewes. I plan to find and install some sort of stouter-than-normal circulating fan to help move the hot air around.

    The stove burns outside air, and exhausts outside as well. Propane connections will be checked with soap solution prior to putting into service. Hoses will be secured, and the 1-lb canister adaptor will be mounted outside.

    I don't think there's a whole lot that can go wrong with them - that's why I chose it over a forced-air heater.

  8. #8
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    The discussion about the danger of having propane on the boat has surfaced with a few co-workers whom are boat owners or commercial fisherman. Most of them have Dickenson Heaters but have never heard of a propane Dickenson Heater. Most of them are against propane anyways on a boat. I can understand the concern and danger. I was thinking also of the one pound tank mount installed outside the bulkhead and using that filler adapter to fill the one pound tanks from a 20 pound tank to cut down on space and storing a big tank. Also the tank is outside and vented, but Propane is heavier than air and could settle in and under the floor. Slight chance but possible. Also plan on a BBQ on the back of the boat for those calm days in a bay holed up with fresh fish for lunch or dinner no matter which heater I get. I have looked at the Toyo also, but have no idea what the NS-2800 costs and what does it come with. Bottom dollar for all the parts to install in the boat, the P-9000 is a little shy of $1100 and the P-12000 is a little shy of $1200 and comes with everything to install. Gotta make a decision before spring and bet one installed. Thanks for all your input.
    Does anyone know what the NS-2800 costs with all parts ready to install?

  9. #9
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Where are you going to install it? Space is a premium on your boat. I know. I used to own one. The nice thing about the forced air ones is that they can be mounted out of the way. I had the wallas 1300 in my 24 hewes and it worked ok. It would not get hot, but it would pull the moisture out and take the edge off. I think that the wallas, toyo, or the espar would be the best fit for your boat. I have an espar in my new boat and it is fantastic. They will cost more, but they are a better choice for this application IMO. Another thing you might consider is that the Hewes cabins are not very tight. I did my best to plug any of the voids, but there was always a draft. Install a CO detector, too.

    Good luck.

    Pete
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  10. #10
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Pete,

    I was thinking of installing it on the bulkhead that separates the cabin and the marine head. Then I could run the exhaust pipe thru the wall also into the marine head which may privide a little heat inside the small head and run the exhaust pipe out the roof. There is also an option to mount it infront of the passenger front seat down low almost on the floor and move the holy **** bar further back so the passenger doesn't have to reach across the exhaust pipe going up and out the roof. Saw pics on the Hewescraft Owners Club Forum this configuration this morning.

    Mark

    I think you have to be a member of their forum to view pics.

    http://hewescraft.30.forumer.com/ind...?showtopic=666

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    I plan to reconfigure the seating on the starboard side by moving the rear seat box forward tight to the front seat, and mounting the heater on the back bulkhead just below the window. You'll only be able to flip the seat lid up when the helm seat is locked forward, which it is 99% of the time on mine anyway. I'll have to re-cut the slots for the aluminum channels that support the seatpads when you make the seats into a bed. It seems like most guests seem to sit on the portside anyway. I'll gladly give up comfortable seating for 4 for some cabin heat. I'll probably have some sort of sturdy sheet aluminum shield that I can attach over it, for those times in summer when we need space to stack blankets and such more than we need heat. It's a compromise, for sure.

    Honestly with the toyo/webasto/espar heaters, it's probably an irrational fear, but I'm a bit put off by the fact that combustion and blowing heat both require battery power, where the Dickinson only needs battery if you want to run the little blower. It will still make heat without power - it lights up like a barbecue with just a simple gas valve. The only place propane can enter the cabin is from bad hose connections or fittings - combustion products can't get in unless something breaks. I'll provide it with switched power so it can be isolated from the battery and still make heat. I'm not really satisfied with any of the exhaust locations I've seen for the forced-air heaters on a hewes - my exhaust will be on the rear of the roof and out of the way of direct spray or submersion in the case of stuffing the bow.

  12. #12

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    I have a p 9000 in my Kingfisher. It has been very dependable, but I agree on getting the 12000 instead.I have a 10# aluminum tank mounted on the motor bracket. If the tank leaks,it's not in the boat. I got the hose from the propane supply, and ran it along the control cables that go to the outboard.

  13. #13
    Member zigzag's Avatar
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    I own the p 9000 and have been very happy with the unit. I still get condensation with the heater. It is not as bad as a buddy heater but because you pull air from outside the air is colder and your windows will fog. A few fans up front work great to keep them clear. I was out of Homer in 28 degree temps and the inside of the cabin was 65 to 70. If you are smart with the propane and check your equipment over before you go out I don't see a problem with propane on your boat. If I were to do it over I would install an espar so I can direct the heat on my front windows and put the heat on the floor. Either way it is nice to extend your fishing season.

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