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Thread: Practice

  1. #1
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    Default Practice

    How often do you practice with you hand guns and how much does it affect your accuracy to get off schedule?

    For a while I was shooting every week, but that proved to be a substantial financal strain. Though I find If I don't shoot at least every other week then I loose a noticable amount of accuracy.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by big_dog60 View Post
    How often do you practice with you hand guns and how much does it affect your accuracy to get off schedule?

    For a while I was shooting every week, but that proved to be a substantial financal strain. Though I find If I don't shoot at least every other week then I loose a noticable amount of accuracy.
    In my experience, you're right all the way around. You have to practice often. It's expensive. And when you don't do it regularly, skills go south fast.

    When I was shooting competitively (double action revolver in various types of matches) I went through a minimum of 600 rounds a week, and I did better in matches when I pushed that up toward 1200. When I was hunting exclusively with handguns (both revolvers and Contenders), I went through 100-200 rounds a week, 12 months a year for close to 20 years.

    Now that I'm neither hunting nor compeating with handguns I'm not managing 200 rounds a month with any consistancy, and results speak for themselves. Barf! It comes back fast, often by the end of a single practice session, but starting out is distinctly embarrassing. You have to practice often and well if you expect to shoot well at the beginning of any shooting session, whether at the range or in the field.

    The bigger point for me, over and above rounds fired, was dry firing nightly at home, toning muscles and breathing, and especially putting 20 rounds a night on my home range slow-fire through a very accurate air pistol.

    You can cut ammo costs a whole bunch by reloading, as you know. But for overall effectiveness, your best investment is the dry fire practice and the air gun practice. And that's not expensive at all.

  3. #3
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default

    No doubt that a person gets rusty rather quickly, there are some easy/cheap ways to practice regularly though.

    With my job I have scheduled training several times a year that is usually pretty intense, but I supplement it significantly with my recreational shooting. I have an inexpensive Browning Buckmark .22 pistol that I have run thousands of rounds through.

    A brick of .22 is running around $14-$18 now and will keep me busy for several hours. All the mechanics are the same as shooting the larger calibers so practice (even with the little guns) is very much worthwhile.
    AKmud
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  4. #4

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    I find that my accuracy suffers the most when my index finger freezes...

  5. #5

    Default winter

    Quote Originally Posted by Oneriver View Post
    I find that my accuracy suffers the most when my index finger freezes...
    My accuracy actually increases when its cold - probably more relaxed when I have the range to myself.


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