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Thread: Grumman Canoe outboard options

  1. #1
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    Default Grumman Canoe outboard options

    I have a 17' Grumman with a transom rear. I will soon be relocating to Fairbanks from Oklahoma. Is an outboard better than a trolling motor on my canoe in Alaskan waters? What size outboard would be best?

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    Default motor size

    as for what size a lot depends on your pocket book the best would be
    9.9 HP /15hp 2 cycle best weight to HP, get the lift for it in Fairbanks when you get there, an you can go down in HP from there. weight will be the biggest problem, if you do get a lift get the one made in Fairbanks cost ??? {you will be able to travel in a lot more streams with ease} what you do need in the motor is to be able to get parts easy [local] an you DO NOT WANT to have a sheer pin in the prop
    if you could trade it in on a 19 FT SQ END that would be a ++++ compaired to what you have now

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    Default yes

    Roger that, Sid. A 19 footer is more usable, I think too. Pete has a lift, and run a 15 hp. EOS.

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    Default Outboard options

    Thank you for the responses. I am curious about your suggestions. I currently run a twin 82lb thrust trolling motor configuration. The only drawback is the weight of the batteries in the bow of the boat; however, it does counterbalance my weight in the rear of the boat. Across the top plate of the bow I use solar charging plates to reduce battery drain. Additionally, with the trolling motor I am able to adjust the shaft length for the depth of water I am fishing. The shaft on a 9.9 or larger motor is typically too long to run in most shallow water creek and rivers. The weight and thrust combination of a large outboard seems as is if it would make the boat very. I understand using a jack plate of sorts to counter the shaft length, but doesn't that increase instability?

  5. #5
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    Default

    Don't bother with a trolling motor, if you put a 15HP on a 17ft'er I would bet you will go swimming some time. A 4 or 5 Hp is as big as I would go on a 17.

    If your running a 15 get a 14 foot Jon boat. Yes you need a short shaft.
    Tim

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    Default motor size

    if you go fishing in a lake or pound the Elect will do but not on the river

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    Default clarification

    I would run a 15 hp on a 19' Grumman, as I did for many years. On a 17', I don't know, but I'd guess the 15 hp would over-power the 17' canoe at half throttle, partly because of the weight. Maybe an 8 hp on a 17'? Maybe.

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    Default bigger better?

    I agree. I'd recommend a 10HP tops for that. And 7 or 8 HP would quite likely go just about as fast with less fuel used; that size might be best all around compromise between weight and power.

  9. #9

    Default Something to keep in mind...

    Unlike a lot of rivers and creeks in the lower 48, most of the rivers/creeks up here only have one access point. This means that you really need to make sure you have enough power to get back to where you started, especially if you are intending to go downstream to start. Many places, floating out is not an option if you encounter problems.

    My experience is with a 15hp on a 19' freighter canoe with a lift for getting through shallow water. A good modification is to add some kind of extension to the skeg to keep the prop from grinding in the gravel (typically run with 3 different props on a trip depending on the area, lake (new or like new prop), river (formerly lake props that found a gravel bar a few too many times), and creek (formerly river props that have found more gravel and are noticeably more worn down)). Throw the extra fuel or hunting/fishing partner in the bow for counterweight. Run the boat standing up in the back for control and visibility.

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    Default 17 ft.

    A friend of mine has a 17ft. Osage canoe with a lift and uses an 8hp motor and he says it's perfect., for fishing, camping, and hunting the 17ft. should be fine except for moose hunting you will find it doesn't have enough space for a moose and all your gear.

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    Default my grumman

    My grumman was built in 1972 16ft, i have a 9 1/2 evinrude 2 stroke 1973 engine it runs great i bought it from a guy in North Pole boat, motor, trailer, for $1200, i love it, have taken me in alot of places. the lift is the one thing I would love to change.
    I will have to look into it when i take some leave,(currently in Iraq) but i here the guy in north pole makes some good ones anyone got any contact info?

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wiso_67 View Post
    but i here the guy in north pole makes some good ones anyone got any contact info?
    Check out the thread titled "What's a lift?" in this section. There is a lot of info on the lifts and the guy who builds them up in the Fairbanks area responded in that thread, so you could probably contact him through that.

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