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Thread: Trekking Poles

  1. #1

    Default Trekking Poles

    Antishock or no? Who prefers which. Ken

  2. #2
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    no antishock. my first pair many years ago were Leki with anti-shock. didn't see much of a benefit with it. i also like my pole not giving in when i put weight on it. black diamond flick-locks are all i use now. they make some anti-shocks, but i have never tried them out.

  3. #3
    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
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    Another vote against anti-shock. I use my trekking poles on 75% of my hikes and never in the middle of a hike have I said to myself "dang the vibration from these poles is killing me I wish I had anti-shock". Unless you're exclusively hiking over solid rock you get plenty of cushion from the dirt, grass, and mud you're hiking over. When I'm hiking on rock or climbing a hill I want a good solid pole that will catch me on all those little slips.

    Anti-shock justs adds cost and another element to your poles that can break.

    I second the Black Diamond flick-lock poles.

  4. #4
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    Another vote for the Black Diamond flick-locks. No anti-shock here either.
    The Marines I have seen around the world have the cleanest bodies, the filthiest minds, the highest morale, and the lowest morals of any group of animals I have ever seen. Thank God for the United States Marine Corps! (Eleanor Roosevelt, 1945)

  5. #5
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    x4 BD flick-locks. Going on 10 years on current set.

  6. #6
    Member Buck Nelson's Avatar
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    Default No anti-shock trekking poles

    Anti-shock has no noticeable advantage to me, makes the poles heavier and, at least the ones I used, NOISIER.

  7. #7
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    I have not tried anti-shock poles, as I used the same logic noted by AK Wonderer -- I could see a benefit on pavement or hard rock, but the tundra and most trails are soft enough.

    REI Outlet has some good deals on trekking poles right now. Several models on sale, PLUS 20% OFF your entire order; may be worth a look if you are in the market...

    REI Outlet

  8. #8

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    What about carbon poles? Will rocks and shale on a sheep hunt tear carbon up. Thats a smokin deal at REI for the BD alpine's. Whatcha think? Ken

  9. #9
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    I have one pair of anti-shocks, and they offer no help in the field, but I guess on pavement or sidewalks they would help. I still use my old ones (standard type).
    The lock design and basket design to me are more important.

  10. #10
    Member mod elan's Avatar
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    I have no experience with the carbons, but why not save your money and just get the Trail Trekkers. 35 bucks less and only 1 ounce difference.

  11. #11

    Default

    Thanks for the help guys..I ordered the trail trekkers for a total cost of 43.95....They dont have replaceable carbide tips which is why I hesitated.. But I bet the orignal tips will last for years. Ken

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