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Thread: Lee resizing lube?

  1. #1
    Member aknewbie's Avatar
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    Default Lee resizing lube?

    I was in the garage earlier resizing a few 35 whelen cases when I got an idea. Could you use Lee resizing lube for a patch lube? It is wax based, not petrolium, can be cut with water, and it doesnt stink or degrade gunpowder. I mean if it works good enough to resize cases, it should work ok for a patch lube, right? Or maybe it would leave nasty fouling in the barrel? I cracked open the lee manual and he said that it made a good bullet lube, so I figured id ask the ones in the know about this stuff. That would be great if it works cause I have a ton of the stuff.

  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by aknewbie View Post
    I was in the garage earlier resizing a few 35 whelen cases when I got an idea. Could you use Lee resizing lube for a patch lube? It is wax based, not petrolium, can be cut with water, and it doesnt stink or degrade gunpowder. I mean if it works good enough to resize cases, it should work ok for a patch lube, right? Or maybe it would leave nasty fouling in the barrel? I cracked open the lee manual and he said that it made a good bullet lube, so I figured id ask the ones in the know about this stuff. That would be great if it works cause I have a ton of the stuff.
    Never tried it, but as long as it doesn't leave a nasty deposit I don't see why not. Since they recommend it for bullet lube, it sounds as though heat shouldn't be a problem. If things as basic as spit, olive oil or crisco work, I'd be tempted to try it if you have a bunch on hand. I'm wondering if there's such a thing as too slick, which I've heard about undiluted Murphy's oil and Ballistol, so the water dilution you suggest may be good.

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    Default Lee resizing lube

    I have used this product for years as a lube on 370 grain lead bullets in my .50 caliber Hawken muzzleloader. It works very well for that purpose being very accurate and easy to clean. I shoot few patched balls but have used this lube successfully for that purpose also. The best reason for using this lube is that it will not melt in a warm barrel like some other muzzle loading lubes. A lubed bullet left in a speed loader for several months will dry out and the lube will become flaky. However, even then it will shoot well. You should have no problem with the Lee resizing lube.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Wyre View Post
    I have used this product for years as a lube on 370 grain lead bullets in my .50 caliber Hawken muzzleloader. It works very well for that purpose being very accurate and easy to clean. I shoot few patched balls but have used this lube successfully for that purpose also. The best reason for using this lube is that it will not melt in a warm barrel like some other muzzle loading lubes. A lubed bullet left in a speed loader for several months will dry out and the lube will become flaky. However, even then it will shoot well. You should have no problem with the Lee resizing lube.
    That stuff is sounding better and better! I hadn't even considered it for a conical lube, but from what you say I should rearrange my thinking. That's really good news about the speedloaders, too. I vastly prefer all-lead conicals to sabots, both for their affect on game and my own cheap nature (I cast my own), but lube for long term storage, much less life in speed loaders is an unresolved problem for me.

    I'm getting ready to pick up a mold for Lee's improved minie (thicker skirts for higher velocities) in 58 caliber, but hadn't settled on a lube. Guess what I'm going to try first? I figure that 580 grain or so bullet on top of 100 grains of 2f or 3f won't loosen all my teeth, but it should certainly do a number on game.

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    Member aknewbie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    That stuff is sounding better and better! I hadn't even considered it for a conical lube, but from what you say I should rearrange my thinking. That's really good news about the speedloaders, too. I vastly prefer all-lead conicals to sabots, both for their affect on game and my own cheap nature (I cast my own), but lube for long term storage, much less life in speed loaders is an unresolved problem for me.

    I'm getting ready to pick up a mold for Lee's improved minie (thicker skirts for higher velocities) in 58 caliber, but hadn't settled on a lube. Guess what I'm going to try first? I figure that 580 grain or so bullet on top of 100 grains of 2f or 3f won't loosen all my teeth, but it should certainly do a number on game.

    BrownBear, dont overlook the Lee liquid Alox either. You can tumble lube with it and it dries like a parafin and works wonderfully!!! Let me know how the improved minnie works out- also did you get the standard or oversize?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by aknewbie View Post
    BrownBear, dont overlook the Lee liquid Alox either. You can tumble lube with it and it dries like a parafin and works wonderfully!!! Let me know how the improved minnie works out- also did you get the standard or oversize?
    Good point on the Alox. I seem to recall someone having trouble with it, but not the details. I'll have to double check. I'd be more inclined to dip than tumble, just for simplicity.

    I haven't ordered yet. I'm accumulating a list of things I need, and will get it all at once to save a bit on shipping.

    I'm getting the standard rather than the oversize. I could use the oversize in my short 58, both because it's bore is standard and I've coned the muzzle. If I ever plan to use it in my GRRW 58, I'll definitely go with the standard. The GRRW has a "choked" bore thats tighter at the muzzle. It's a bonus for accuracy, but a bugger for starting even "standard" 58 cal projectiles. I'm using .562 balls in it, for example. A .575 ball without a patch will sit on the muzzle without dropping in, and a .570 will just barely drop down. If there's any little flaw or nick in a .570, it won't drop either. Fortunately my shorty likes the .562's just fine, so I shoot them in both.

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    Member aknewbie's Avatar
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    I'm just coming up with some ideas for my kodiak for when it gets here- hopefully tomorrow!!!! But I keep hearing the same thing from a lot of people that if you have conicals loaded, one has a tendency to creep foreward once firing the other barrel. I dont see that being a problem with a tight PRB, but I can see that with a conical and a stiff charge behind it. I was thinking that an oversize may stay snug. Also I am very interested in the 440gr REAL bullet fron Lee. I have a friend that casts them for his .45 and gets excellent accuracy with it, liquid alox and 90gr of pyrodex.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by aknewbie View Post
    I'm just coming up with some ideas for my kodiak for when it gets here- hopefully tomorrow!!!! But I keep hearing the same thing from a lot of people that if you have conicals loaded, one has a tendency to creep foreward once firing the other barrel. I dont see that being a problem with a tight PRB, but I can see that with a conical and a stiff charge behind it. I was thinking that an oversize may stay snug. Also I am very interested in the 440gr REAL bullet fron Lee. I have a friend that casts them for his .45 and gets excellent accuracy with it, liquid alox and 90gr of pyrodex.
    Keep us posted!

    I've got a funny read on that load shift business. I shot a double barrel 12 gauge muzzeloader a whole lot for about 10 years. You hear the same thing about the second barrel on shotguns, too. But the only time I can document it was a problem, it was the result of lots of firings of only one barrel while leaving the other unfired. Yeah, EVENTUALLY the charge in the second barrel starts to move.

    But the fix was really, really easy. All I did was use the second barrel to "store" my ramrod while I was loading the first barrel. You gotta do something with it after you seat the over-powder wad and while you're pouring in the shot and adding the over-shot card anyway. Shoving it down the second bore was lots easier than pinching it under my arm or between my knees or holding onto it while I did everything else. Usually it ended up falling on the ground. But shove it down the second bore real firm, and it made sure the load was still seated, while it stayed handy for the next use.

    With a double rifle, I just plan to shove it down the second bore real firm as a last step after reloading the first bore. If you're only loading one bore, you're not in a hurry anyway. I'm betting I don't see any movement of a bullet after just one shot, but if I do, THEN I'm going to start worrying about more bore tension. But it's a "problem" that may not need fixing at all.

    As for the REAL bullets, my only experience with them is using the two weights available in 54 caliber. They worked well, but with a couple of provisos-

    You want to cast them out of really pure lead. That oversize top driving band should be a bonus for keeping a bullet from moving in the bore, but if it's anything but pure lead you're going to pay bloody hell getting it to seat down the bore.

    And second, accuracy absolutely stunk unless you put a lubed felt wad between it and the powder. From all I could determine, there was lots of gas leakage up around the base of the bullet if you didn't use the lubed felt wad to help seal it.

  9. #9
    Member aknewbie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Keep us posted!

    I've got a funny read on that load shift business. I shot a double barrel 12 gauge muzzeloader a whole lot for about 10 years. You hear the same thing about the second barrel on shotguns, too. But the only time I can document it was a problem, it was the result of lots of firings of only one barrel while leaving the other unfired. Yeah, EVENTUALLY the charge in the second barrel starts to move.

    But the fix was really, really easy. All I did was use the second barrel to "store" my ramrod while I was loading the first barrel. You gotta do something with it after you seat the over-powder wad and while you're pouring in the shot and adding the over-shot card anyway. Shoving it down the second bore was lots easier than pinching it under my arm or between my knees or holding onto it while I did everything else. Usually it ended up falling on the ground. But shove it down the second bore real firm, and it made sure the load was still seated, while it stayed handy for the next use.

    With a double rifle, I just plan to shove it down the second bore real firm as a last step after reloading the first bore. If you're only loading one bore, you're not in a hurry anyway. I'm betting I don't see any movement of a bullet after just one shot, but if I do, THEN I'm going to start worrying about more bore tension. But it's a "problem" that may not need fixing at all.

    As for the REAL bullets, my only experience with them is using the two weights available in 54 caliber. They worked well, but with a couple of provisos-

    You want to cast them out of really pure lead. That oversize top driving band should be a bonus for keeping a bullet from moving in the bore, but if it's anything but pure lead you're going to pay bloody hell getting it to seat down the bore.

    And second, accuracy absolutely stunk unless you put a lubed felt wad between it and the powder. From all I could determine, there was lots of gas leakage up around the base of the bullet if you didn't use the lubed felt wad to help seal it.


    GOOD STUFF!!! That is really good to know about the REAL bullets. I like to shoot a lot, but if it doesnt really help me out when im hunting, then I dont perticularly care to mess with it- i.e. using felt wad- adding a loading step. Not that it is a real big concern with a double, but i guess im wiered like that.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by aknewbie View Post
    I'm just coming up with some ideas for my kodiak for when it gets here- hopefully tomorrow!!!! But I keep hearing the same thing from a lot of people that if you have conicals loaded, one has a tendency to creep foreward once firing the other barrel. I dont see that being a problem with a tight PRB, but I can see that with a conical and a stiff charge behind it. I was thinking that an oversize may stay snug. Also I am very interested in the 440gr REAL bullet fron Lee. I have a friend that casts them for his .45 and gets excellent accuracy with it, liquid alox and 90gr of pyrodex.
    The Kodiak double presents the problem of haveing the bullet pulled forward off the powder charge.
    To help prevent this shoot both barrels alternately, even though one barrel may shoot/print more accurately than the other. Minie balls/bullets are designed to obturate when the powder charge fires sealing the bore and pressing the shirts against the barrel walls. Minie balls are usually somewhat small compared to PRBs or Real Bullets. I understand you were talking about an oversized mould, I've never dealt with one of those though so I don't know what the outcome would be.
    We used the REAL bullets almost exclusively in our Kodiaks for years. Some of them liked the shorter REAL bullets some liked the longer ones; the rifles that shot PRBs the best seemed to like the short REAL bullets.
    The bullets we used were pure lead lubed with Thompsons as long as we alternated barrels, presented no problems.
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