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Thread: POW logging

  1. #1
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    Default POW logging

    Does anyone know what parts of the island contain the least amount of logging(ie..south,north, east, west)? Of that which was logged, where are the youngest cuttings vs. oldest cutting?(can you give an approximate age associated with thest cuttings?)

    Does the southern portion green up before the northern part? Thanks

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    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    The Native lands are logged boundary to boundary but that is no trespassing, it's taken just over 20 years or so to do that.

    The southern part of the island has very little logging as a chunk is So POW Wilderness. No logging in the Karta Wilderness.

    The rest is mostly logged as that is the reason it is roaded. No logging = no roads. It is all in various stages of regrowth. Not very much recent logging as the Ketchikan pulp mill went down in '97. Since then very little logging on USFS has happened.

    The Hollis / Maybeso cut were the first in '52 to mid '60 ... then the Thorne Bay / Staney cuts up to mill closure. Seems like the Coffman and Whale Pass cuts started in the '70's and went up to the '80's as well as the Lab Bay end of things. Polk Inlet was cut in the early to mid '80's.

    Most of the USFS cut blocks are becoming non-huntable due to regrowth. There are the few recently ('90's) small cut blocks scattered throughout.

    The west side Beaches are usually ahead of the east side Beaches as far as green-up goes.

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    Default Thanks muskeg

    Really helps to piece the puzzle together for those of use that only have access to sattelite imagery/photos. In most in not all cases, they would leave a riparian buffer around water bodies, streams? Again, Thanks for the info.

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    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Not necessarily .... the Native logging have cut to the water line.

    And much of the USFS logging in the '50's;'60's and '70's cut to the water. Stream side is where much of the largest Spruce grow. Not until recent rules were there stream buffers and cut block size limits put in place.

    Not until very recently have we seen any forest Wildlife benifet programs ... up until that point what little reforestation programs there were ... were $ budget based for timber production.

    And even now the USFS is only minimally implementing any upland Wildlife forestry programs which are mostly experimental.

    Opinions vary.

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    Default Thanks

    Muskeg,
    Thanks for the input.

  6. #6
    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Default still good hunting ...

    You must keep in mind that POW Island is not or was not all logged. It is a <2000 sq mile Island. I don't know the actual acreage that have been logged but it is substantial ....

    After logging the Bear love it as forest succession takes place. After time that site just becomes unhuntable because of visibility. The Bear are still there.

    Different story for the Deer. As cut blocks grow from brush into young regrowth a canopy develops restricting light to the forest floor. It becomes a biological desert under there. And will remain in that condition for 100 plus years. Long term devastating for the Deer. The USFS is now starting to try different types of programs to open that canopy to promote understory growth. But there is only minimal $'s budgeted for that. Major emphasis is still on commercial forest production even though logging is currently minimal.

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    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by muskeg View Post
    though logging is currently minimal.
    but on the rise Finally! Slowly but steadily.
    Phoenix survived. Viking got some stuff going. Brower went bankrupt. shaun c might get back into it. And Alcan is pulling stuff from all over. New roadlines by hollis, and luck lake/coffman. Sounds like second growth from Long island is going to be the big thing and Phoenix still working Dall. Plus some USFS blocks up by Wrangell too. Kake tribal still has land they want to log. And Mental health opened up some more out by Kasaan and Cape Fox is still letting us log in Ketchikan. Little rumor is there might be some blocks out in Staney for 2nd growth and maybe some cuts along Log jam (I doubt that though)
    Also a LOT of heli units being laid out. No word if Columbia or Croman are going to bid directly or just charter the work for someone else. Woods maybe-but I doubt their little Kmax will be enough, gonna need a Vertol for some of that wood.

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    Quote Originally Posted by muskeg View Post

    Different story for the Deer. As cut blocks grow from brush into young regrowth a canopy develops restricting light to the forest floor. It becomes a biological desert under there. And will remain in that condition for 100 plus years. Long term devastating for the Deer. The USFS is now starting to try different types of programs to open that canopy to promote understory growth. But there is only minimal $'s budgeted for that. Major emphasis is still on commercial forest production even though logging is currently minimal.
    You mean the US Forest Service is starting to do forestry? Amazing!
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    Member ACNDHO's Avatar
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    Default You mean the US Forest Service is starting to do forestry?

    Been doing it for years. AMAZING!!
    Even a jackass won't stumble on the same stone twice.

  10. #10
    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Yep ... sold a whole lot of wood for .50 cents a thousand ....

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