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Thread: wells?

  1. #1

    Default wells?

    Can any one tell me what the going rate per foot is for having a well drilled? In general is fine and if you know the specifics for Tok that is even better. I am just trying to get a general idea. If you happen to know a general depth wells are typically sunk in Tok that would be great but I know I am stretching it a bit

    Thanks.

  2. #2

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    $37.00/$38.00 per foot would be ballpark with 6" casing to bedrock.

  3. #3
    Member COtoAK's Avatar
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    I know it's different everywhere, but we paid 3k for 60ft well 5 years ago.
    It's a certain amount to set up and drill and another amount to drill per foot.
    We also hooked up our own pump, so there was no cost in that.
    Lurker.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for the replies. I do not want to mess around trying put my own well in with the permafrost hassel. The way I see it my time is too valuable to spend it trying to learn when I can hire an expert who already has done that and been there.

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    Member upinak's Avatar
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    These people are the fairest from what I am told.

    http://www.acewaterwelldrilling.com/

    It would also be easier if you got a Geological Topo map from USGS (you can download it free on the USGS site) to find out where the best area to drill is. Sometimes you can get lucky and find out what they will be drilling and not end up with a dry hole.

    Good Luck

  6. #6
    Member Sterlingmike's Avatar
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    Default Well

    I had one done last year at $35 a foot in Sterling. Depends on where you are and how big a rig they might need. My well was 400ft. (unfortunately). Rates are fairly close among drillers, reputations vary a lot. Get recommendations.

    M

  7. #7
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    I used to drill wells all over the Tok area about 30 years ago. Wells in that area can range from 40 to 110 feet. Most are in the 60 to 80' range if I remember right. Had one drilled here in Delta, ( 110 miles away from Tok) 2 years ago, was $50 a foot just for the well.

  8. #8

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    thanks for the replies. This is exactly what I was hoping to get. very much appriciated.

  9. #9

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    Rock Skipper you are right on on the price. I am having a well drilled here in Delta in the spring and the cost is 45- 50 a ft. My area here water is about 90 ft. I will be using Artic Drilling here.

  10. #10
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    They are the one's that did mine. I will say this they did a good job on mine, but hit me for an extra 20' I did'nt need, ouch. Talk to your neighbors and see what there well is and ask if they have had a problem with the water table.

    When he did mine he said he hit water at 80' and went down to 100', I thought it was a little strange for the area I was in, but once its down you pay for it. Called the next door neighbor couple days later and asked there well depth, 78'. There well is about 500' from mine,lol

    Best advice I can give is to stay right there while they drill the well, 100' takes about 4 hours

  11. #11
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    Default Klickitat, Permafrost?

    Do you already have property? Golly, permafrost is bad news. Sure, you can do the pilings on virgin ground and level, and level, and re-level all the time. I would pay more for good solid soil and be happy about it.
    If you don't have property, I'd be looking hard at areas free from the stuff. Use neighbors drill logs, excavation info, surveyor info, etc, to try and stay away from that darn frozen ground.
    Some areas with permafrost are so deep you might not ever hit water.
    Having a few test holes on a piece of property is cheap insurance.

  12. #12

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    Hi Rock,
    My depth is about 90 ft to water but you want to go deeper to get a (well head) that is very common so you have a bit of a reserve supply of water. My neighbor Jon is an expert on wells and water. I does depend on where you are at. I have a friend out on Sawmill creek who hit water at 20 ft and another on Tanana Loop did the same thing.

  13. #13
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Hotcity- you are correct about going past the water table. My problem is I had 40 feet of water in the casing. lol. one thing for sure it'll never run out

  14. #14

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    Rock..LOL Geezzzz I guess you will have plenty of water. I do not even hit water till 90 ft then want to go to 120 ft.

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    Member upinak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ak River Rat View Post
    Do you already have property? Golly, permafrost is bad news. Sure, you can do the pilings on virgin ground and level, and level, and re-level all the time. I would pay more for good solid soil and be happy about it.
    If you don't have property, I'd be looking hard at areas free from the stuff. Use neighbors drill logs, excavation info, surveyor info, etc, to try and stay away from that darn frozen ground.
    Some areas with permafrost are so deep you might not ever hit water.
    Having a few test holes on a piece of property is cheap insurance.

    Ever seen a Methane blow out from the permafrost?

    Or anyone.. Rock_Skipper may know what I am talking about. The area I am looking at is known for methane pockets.

    RS, what does the company do when or if something like that happens. I am curious.

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    Default permafrost and wells

    Even though I was born here, let me ask you guys a question I just thought of. What are the issues with trying to drill a well through permafrost?
    The ground temps are obviously below freezing. Will that affect the well, assuming you can find water below it?
    Sure there is a difference in frozen ground from lenses to fully frozen soils that run deep. Assume that this property is the latter.

  17. #17
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    From my days of drilling with Fred Cook back when I was a pup, I learned alot about the structure of the land in and around the Delta area, Tok, and tenderfoot. The only well that I remember that caused us a problem with permafrost was at the Northway Village laundry building, That well was a pain in the you know what. The well was over 100' feet if I remember right and we hit permafrost right off the get go. Went back the next day, colder than heck, to drop the pump in and the thing was frozen shut 10' down. We kinda loked at each other and said what the heck? We tried to steam thaw it out for two days, did'nt get to far with that operation, ended up just feeding a garden hose down with cold water from another sorce and went threw about 40' of frost before we broke threw, I think we add some kinda heat tape to the inside well pipe, but that was one of those well's I won't forget.

    Another one was on tenderfoot, this one has to do with methane. This well we went down 410' hiting everything the book could throw at us. Bent the pipe at something at like 210' and had to put the drill threw hammer in reverse to get back as much pipe as possibable, I think we had to leave 80' in the ground. Moved over a little ways and started again( note we always had a tab welded on to the pipe with a saftey chain so it could'nt fall when it hit a pocket) This time when we hit something big down there we us'ed what is called a shape charge, an explosive that blasts downward, drill about 3 to 6 feet below the bottom of the drop the charge down and try to cover as much of the machine as possible, lol , dose'nt help much stuff comes out of the pipe like a canon, Guess who got to clean up the mess Anyway we hit methane pockets all the way down after 200'. Hit water in three differant spots , but it was all bad. Last one was at like 385 or something like that and we were only getting 1 gal a minute. Fred and the home owner had a talk about wether we were going to contiue or back it up to the 385 foot mark, at that time it was 32 dollars a foot, so we were looking at over $12,000.00 at the time and this was around 1980, and Fred was'nt charging them for the well that we abanded. It was decided we would pull the well back to the 385 mark and they would get a holding tank to do the gardens and stuff. You could'nt drink it. I don't know what ever happened with that well, after all these years tho now my curiosty is kicking in again, wonder if they ever went down farther or what. One thing I remember about that well is that we hit all kinds of wood after the 200' mark and Fred took them into UAF and it turned out to be some kind of tropical wood. Go figure.

    I probably drilled over 200 wells with Fred, but those 2 stand out the most.
    1 week for the Northway well, 1 month on the tenderfoot well. E.S.

  18. #18
    Member upinak's Avatar
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    Default Holy COW!

    I have heard about that well (Tenderfoot), what a small world on actually meeting one of the men who drilled it. If I remember right and the guy at USGS wasn't fibbing or thinking of a different well. The USGS went in to do Methane Hydrate research in that area and used that well as the first tester. A bunch of shot holes from what I gather. Red Dog, is another one they tested.. and a few others in the Interior area.

    Interesting at what comes around goes around, huh.

  19. #19
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    I'll tell you about another one. lol.

    We drilled the one at that Devil's Mountain Lodge at the end of the Nebesna road. We took in 200' of pipe and punched her down, and no water, we decided Fred would go and get some more pipe, and I would stay there. Fred left to go back to Delta to get some more pipe and the guy's at the lodge ( you know who I'm talking about) asked me if I wanted to go fishing, Heck Ya! got in the plane flew to Jack Lake, transfered to a float plane and flew over to a Lake that starts with a T. We were coming in for a landing and seen this Grizz running down a Bou. less than a quarter mile from where he droped me off. He taxi's up to this little shack on the side of the lake, and says I'll be back this evening, with that he's off down the lake,lol. There I sit with no gun or nothing. They had a little lake boat there and I found a paddle in the shack, along with a hachet, I spent all day paddling around that lake and catching record fish, all of which I turned back, spent alot of time looking at the shore for that Grizz,lol, It was getting pretty late a me a little worried (by myself with only a little ax to protect me) until I heard that plane come in, jumped in and off we went. Fred came in that night, and in the morning hooked another section of pipe, went down 5 more feet and hit water.

    That was a good trip

  20. #20
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    upinak, I would be really interested in who you to talked up there at the USGS, or a place you got your research from, Thanks, E.S.

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