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Thread: Bear Baiting Questions

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    Default Bear Baiting Questions

    Questions????

    1. What is the best bait? How does the honey burn do? Anyone use this stuff? http://www.boarmasters.com/Bear_Bait...ttractant.html

    2. How much coverage does a bait station have? If you are going to put several bait stations out how far apart should they be?

    3. If you make several kills at a bait station will bear still come in?

    4. How long after you set up your bait station is it ready to hunt?

    5. After how many days of seeing no bears should you relocate your bait station? Do you relocate your bait station? Do bear move around enough that you can mantain one station for the whole season?

    Thanks

    Troy

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    Quote Originally Posted by tv321 View Post
    Questions????

    1. What is the best bait? How does the honey burn do? Anyone use this stuff? http://www.boarmasters.com/Bear_Bait...ttractant.html

    2. How much coverage does a bait station have? If you are going to put several bait stations out how far apart should they be?

    3. If you make several kills at a bait station will bear still come in?

    4. How long after you set up your bait station is it ready to hunt?

    5. After how many days of seeing no bears should you relocate your bait station? Do you relocate your bait station? Do bear move around enough that you can mantain one station for the whole season?

    Thanks

    Troy
    Here are some answers and will get plenty more they are like A--holes everyone has them

    1. doughnut or pastries are good, dogfood with molasses or plain., sweetfeed for horses as well. Honey burns ok and never used the stuff!
    2. The last time put baits out with other hunter we were palcing the baits about 5 miles apart. If you get the right area bears will come for miles
    3. Yes bears will continue to come to the bait as long as food is plentiful .
    4. I would give it at least 2-4 days unless you perform a grease or honey burn. Then would check it on day two for sure!
    5. Is the bait being "HIT" are bears eating the food and you just not see the bears? WOuld only move the station if it was taken over by grizzlies. If not see any bears and not hits then for sure do grease/honey burn and then look out. If you are getting hits and still not see bears then have two hunters walk into the bait make noise like adding food and such, one hunter climb stand and the other make huge amount of noise as he leaves the area.
    Just a few thoughts from your local redneck! Take all advice from all and filter for your area and use

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    Member Toddler's Avatar
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    1. I use a 50# bag sweet-feed or Cob (same thing) mixed with 1 large bottle of pancake syrup and a large bag of confection sugar. I swear my bait smells like Waffle House.
    2. I know I had several bait stations within a mile and I was still getting hit all of the time.
    5. I would only move if I had a griz problem.

    Drew

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    If you haven't been to the Baiting class. During the class Tim can answer all your questions. The ABA will have one and a class on how to flesh a bear. Mike Carter from Last Frontier taxidermy will be fleshing a bear. 7 Feb Capt. Cook. Don't know the time yet on all the seminars.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

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    Member Waldo2382's Avatar
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    Default Bear baiting clinic schedule

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...e.hit_calendar

    Here is the bear baiting clinics available so far from the ADFG website.

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    Member RCBOWHUNTER's Avatar
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    Default Baiting

    1. For the bulk of the food I use dog food. I top it with pastries, grease, and syrup. I also spread the grease all over the ground around the barrel so the bear leaves a trail coming in/out of the food source for other bears to follow. I used a honey burn for the first time last year and it worked great!

    2. I wouldn't put another personal bait station closer than a mile or two from eachother. That being said, running more than one bait station is going to cost you more time, money, and other resources. But I am sure there are plenty out there that run more than one.

    3. Bears will still come after there have been kills on the site. I have seen bears come in the next evening after I killed a bear. Gut piles are usually gone in a day, probably cleaned up by other bears.

    4. That depends on when you set up your bait station. Bears come out of the den at different times around the state. I personally don't set up my bait until mid May and usually have good success last week in May to first week in June.

    5. I echo what has been said already with this question. My advice is to get a trail camera. They are the best scouting tool out there for patterning bear movement and knowing if you are getting hit and by what, black bear/grizzly bear, etc. Start using a trail camera and I promise you will be hooked. I look forward to checking my pictures more than sitting in my stand waiting for a bear. Awesome tool!

    Good luck Troy.

    Ryan

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    Thumbs up Kettle Corn

    One thing that we have used for bait that works is popcorn. We just by big 50lb bags of it and pop it up in a turkey cooker. Then we throw it in to a wheel barrow and dump and mix a few bottles of syrup and sugar into it.

    I've never done it, but for a burn, and a tasty treat, it would be fun to try and fry up some bacon at your station.

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    I second what RCB stated, however I would stick some kinda old carpet or something like it around the station and cover it with something that they will step in or lie in so as to when they leave, they will have a scent trail to follow back to the spot, it's basicaly the same thing that RCB said, but if it rains?, I don't know just seems to work better. The trail cams are great tools. Good luck

  9. #9

    Default April 15!

    Troy,
    Been baiting for over a decade & I would agree with what most everyone has said.
    -Never have relocated a bait station due to brown bears hitting it. Find that blackies still come in regaurdless & normally the Brownies move on to look for a more meat based diet (spring moose calves)
    -I notice location of tree stand is key(wind/travel pattern) & it is good to have 2 & at times to even move it & mix it up.
    - I find that natural borders such as rivers can become boundries & what is hitting on one side may not be over on the other side.
    -They tend to like there food, sweet, fat, & loaded with cholesterol.
    -I have used hundreds of pounds of bait to even establish a bait with just a bag of skittles & scent.
    -My advice is to stay out of areas all ready being baited/posted by other hunters & be respectfull of thier space. Wait to see what all comes in & not harvest the first thing that walks in! If a blackie comes in & acts nervous chances are he isn't the baddest thing @ your bait. If he comes in all nervouse & skittish there is a bigger king of the jungle, or just one big Brownie
    -I better stop yacking I am sure the clinic will answer most of your questions. Good Luck

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    I agree with Justin about the browns. The first bear I shot over bait came in about 45 min after I scared a brownie out.

    One of the things that hasnt been mentioned yet to use as bait is anise. We mix it up with cooking oil and spray it around the site. Seems to work pretty well.

    We took 2 bears last year and more were still hitting the site, in fact one of the guys I hunt with shot one with his bow last year and after he and another partner got out of the stand there was another bear coming over the hill for dinner. That one got away. I wasnt there that night, but from what I was told it was pretty exciting.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RCBOWHUNTER View Post
    3. Bears will still come after there have been kills on the site. I have seen bears come in the next evening after I killed a bear. Gut piles are usually gone in a day, probably cleaned up by other bears.


    Good luck Troy.

    Ryan

    that is an interesting comment. i run two stands one of which is hit hard every year by grizz and blackies. to-date i have never had a gut pile eaten. they push them aside and go for the food. the bones of the blackies are also undisturbed.. the flies love it. but the bears leave it all alone...


    i will agree that more then one stand is a lot of work... but keep in mind a hunter may have only two registered to his name and license, at a time.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default My 2 cent's

    • What is the best bait? How does the honey burn do?
    I use Honey Burns and Costco’s Imitation Vanilla to establish the station and cover my scent. Once the bears fin it, they will come. I use Ol Roy dog food from Wal-Mart (they love it) Once the bears are on the bait, they will pretty much return. A lot of guy’s are starting to use popcorn. It is light weight and does not weigh anything. Popcorn has a heck of a lot of scent too. I would think it would help pull them in, although I have never tried it.
    Note: Here is a little trick that has worked for me; if you can get scent on the bear (molasses or honey mixed with vanilla) than the bear will help you lay a scent trail for his buddies when he leaves. Put the stuff on your bait so that the bear gets it on his paws, when dragging the bait out of the drum.

    2. How much coverage does a bait station have? If you are going to put several bait stations out how far apart should they be?

    Tough questions. I think it just depends on where you setup the bait and how many bears are in the location. We had two baits about ¼ mile apart, we both were seeing bears as there are plenty of bears in the area. We did notice that the bears made their rounds; some bears would hit one station 5 days in a row, than change stations. It is amazing what you will learn if you use Trail Cameras.

    3. If you make several kills at a bait station will bear still come in?
    As long as you don’t kill them all, they will come
    J. We had a station with a stand big enough for two. We have shot one bear, drug it to a safe location and continued to hunt with bears still coming in. Heck! I had them coming in, while we were moving the bear.
    4. How long after you set up your bait station is it ready to hunt?

    This totally depends on how good of a location you pick, snow fall and timing, etc. etc. We usually set ours up, put tons of scent out and check it often. In places we have had bait stations for years, thing happen pretty quick. It is amazing what you will learn if you use Trail Cameras.


    5. After how many days of seeing no bears should you relocate your bait station? If I am finding sign in other spots and my station is not getting, hit I move to the sign.

    Do you relocate your bait station?
    Once I have an established station, I don’t move it unless something significant happens, like someone moving in on top of me, or messing with the station while I am gone.
    Do bear move around enough that you can maintain one station for the whole season? If you have a good location the answer is Yes!. We have one bait station that we avg about 7 bears a year on. It is amazing what you will learn if you use Trail Cameras. Is there a pattern here? J

    6: Trail Cameras: I may have mentioned this already, but it is amazing what you will learn if you put out trail cameras. There are a lot of myths and stories about bait stations that a trail camera quickly disspells. Like when the bears hit the bait, Brown Bears run off all black bears and such. It also tells you if you are getting Big Bears on your station, once you shoot a couple (unless you are strictly meat hunting) you may not want to stay on location, if you are not seeing trophy sized bears. On our station we found that most of the activity was during the traditional times (early morning and the mostly late 9 to 11 pm) but we had a really really big blackie, that only hit the station in the middle of the day. It was a boring sit in the middle of the day, but for a 6’7” Black Bear in that area it was worth it!



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    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Brown Bears

    [quote=Justin;415470]Troy,
    -Never have relocated a bait station due to brown bears hitting it. Find that blackies still come in regaurdless & normally the Brownies move on to look for a more meat based diet (spring moose calves)

    I agree with Justin's comments on Brown Bears. I have gotten out of baiting the last several season's, but my hunting partner still maintains the location. We have tons of Brownies where we hunt, so he started establihing the station several weeks later and he swears that it helped cut down on the Brown Bear hits. Makes sense to me, since a. The Brown Bears come out sooner and b. They tend to hang with a food source once they find it. At least for some period of time anyway. His theory is that since there is nothing to hold them, they comeout and move on.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    i Don't worry about the Grizz either. they hit first each spring i have one that has come back four years in a row.. A grizz never forgets where it finds a meal and will come back year after year for it. Jr comes back withing 18 hours of his first appearance four years ago... like clock work.. when they first come in they usually tear things up pretty good. i leave sweaty shirts and rags with my scent on them hanging above the bait.. and when a grizz takes over i will pee in front of the bait... marking it mine.

    they all continue to eat but the damage is much less. the real issue is bringing NEW people into the stand. if you hunt with a buddy his scent needs to be there all the time too. i have noticed a dramatic decrease in the days following me taking some new person to the stands. if a grizz comes in stop baiting... they will hang for a few days and leave when the food is gone. just watch your back trail while it is being hit... they are a hell of a lot more likely to GUARD a bait from other bears then blackie. i ALWAYS make a lot of noise coming into a bait, and give them time to get out... They know it is mine and will push back out to let me in... if you get one that is tearing up ground and trees that bear is CLAIMING the site as his. i have found it best to discourage that behavior by acting like a bigger bear. they get used to your scent, and will not be afraid of it when your in the stand. especially if you are there daily. in fact i find they walk up to the bait and turn and look right at me.

    watch the small game... squirrels and rabbits seem to like the dog food... they will be eating away.. and disappears FAST... that is the first indication that a bear is coming... i have never heard a BIG bear, he just appears, the small ones are clumsier and make noise coming in....



    Location, LOCATION LOCATION......how do you pick a spot...


    this will require leg work.. BEARS love moose trial.. spend time beating the bush... if hunting off a river.. walk inland from the bank. there will be a trail following the river 30-100 yards in... walk this trail in each direction until you find a SMALL natural clearing with other trials converging on it.... that is where you set up.... i love early April as the snow is melting and the the trails are still frozen in.... white lines of ice, running though the woods are easy to spot. setting up on the bank... is a recipe for disaster. first other hunters can see it. second you and the bears have NO back door...

    set your entrance opposite from the bears. they will make ROADS to your bait. give them away out and you will have fewer confrontations when your not ready for them.

    when hunting up here.. i have main trails the bears walk ATV uses etc... i set up at least 100 yards of this trail... on a set of game trails leading to it.. if we use a trail the game will make another one in the bush for when we are on it.... COVER COVER COVER... the thicker the brush around your "clearing" the better... Blackies love cover. especially when competing with a grizz..... my clearing of choice are about 20 yards in diameter.. and set my stand back in the brush of cover...

    now when you have a young bear walk in.....these guys are like puppy's in nature.. .curious as to what you are...you DO NOT need to shoot it just because it comes up your tree... poke him with a stick or whap him on the nose and he will go down.. he is just looking..last thing it wants is a fight 20 foot in the air. remember he is HANGING on too.... now big ol grizz if you tick him off ... may dig you out.... use your discretion make sure your gear is tight to the tree and pick a tree big enough..
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Lots of good info being posted.

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    [quote=Vince;415599]that is an interesting comment. i run two stands one of which is hit hard every year by grizz and blackies. to-date i have never had a gut pile eaten. they push them aside and go for the food. the bones of the blackies are also undisturbed.. the flies love it. but the bears leave it all alone...


    Interesting comment, I once put the heart and liver of a bear I shot into one of my bait barrels ( I had two at the same site) and the bears would not touch it but would hit the other barrel. I always wondered if that was normal. I will have to try another test the next time I get a bear.

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    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Gut Piles

    I always get my bear away from the bait station before I gut or skin it. I use one of those kids sleds to drag them out of the area before I start skinning them. I works pretty good especially after the bears walk a solid trail into the bait station. I tied small loops along both sides of the sled, I roll the bear on the sled and than lace it in with parachute cord. Works pretty good at getting the blood and guts out of the area.

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    Thanks for all the info!!!

    Do these rules change if you are wanting to hunt in the Predator Control Area 16b? If so how?

    Troy

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    Default Ditto

    Quote Originally Posted by cusackla View Post
    I always get my bear away from the bait station before I gut or skin it. I use one of those kids sleds to drag them out of the area before I start skinning them. I works pretty good especially after the bears walk a solid trail into the bait station. I tied small loops along both sides of the sled, I roll the bear on the sled and than lace it in with parachute cord. Works pretty good at getting the blood and guts out of the area.

    Exact same approach here.
    Roughly 66% of gut piles are moved/eaten within 48 hours.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    another bumpity bump
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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