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Thread: Halibut cord attached to Anchor -explained

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    Default Halibut cord attached to Anchor -explained

    YOU GUYS THAT SENT ME A PM ABOUT THIS HERE YA' GO-
    I spoke to a few people about this and I was surprised how many didn't understand so here it is: Most "plow" type or Bruce have a hole at the bend or elbow, also the main hole at the end. The hole at the elbow is designed for a messenger line w/bouy, BUT, no one needs to carry the extra messenger line. Attach your chain directly to the elbow hole with a horseshoe ring/bolt/etc., now the chain lays parallel along the longest shaft of the anchor. At the end hole of the anchor shaft -one loop of halibut cord, -tied to one chain link and the hole, not two loops, just one. The cord now attaches the chain in the logical fashion to the anchor. If the anchor hooks under a cable or solid rock shelf, the strength of the halibut cord on the chain will break with all the tugging before your anchor rope does. Now the anchor can back right out because your now pulling from the elbow NOT the end of the shaft. If you hook it from the end of the shaft and not the elbow and have no messenger tied to the elbow the anchor stays where she lays forever. (Zip ties have been tried, they are just not as strong as halibut cord and break more easily.)
    Note: If you do not have a plow/Bruce type anchor, chances are you have a "lunch" anchor (nice for a lunch time break during the day, but not for sleeping at night in the dark...) Only the plows head for China the more they are pulled on. Yes, others may work, but while your boat whips like a kite tail in the wind in the dark, if you don't have a plow type she can drag. When the water stops lapping at the hull and your boat stops whipping side to side, wake up you are dragging anchor!
    I break my cord maybe a couple times a season, the anchor works the same with or without the cord attached to the chain. I have slept through storms that whipped the boat side to side in sharp jerks for hours, that broke the cord, but didn't affect the hold of the anchor. (ALWAYS, SET YOUR SHALLOW ALARM AND DEEP ALARM ON YOUR SOUNDER! IT'S ONE THING TO WAKE UP ON THE ROCKS, ANOTHER IN THE MIDDLE OF THE OCEAN!)
    I hope this cleared up some stuff, I know pictures would have helped.

  2. #2

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    Zip ties work very well for this purpose.
    Much faster than tying line if you need to replace in a hurry.
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    Default One more tip...

    The bigger and heavier boat you have makes a difference. Big zip ties worked great for my buddy in his 17' Alumaweld but they have never last long for me. I have a 24' Olympic and zip ties bust when the tide really starts to pull on me. I have use halibut cord also but like Myers said in a storm side to side it has the chance to break. I think it wears out too easily while being rubbed side to side all night. The best I have found for me is three to four raps of small stainless steal wire but it is more time consuming. Halibut cord works best for a day of fishing when you're awake and alert.

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    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    When its gonna blow i wouldn't be worried about hanging down my anchor and i would NEVER TRUST a piece of halibut twine, zip ties or wire to not chafe off or break when the wind is willie wahing your around in circles like the house in the wizad of oz !! I've been there too many nights in the pitch black doing that dance, the last time it happened i was staring out my windows all night like a mental patient wondering when the next blast was gonna blow me up on a rock pile. NO THANKS TO THE ZIP TIE IDEA (just my opinion) If your worried about losing a anchor while fishing just make a rebar grapple and use that, it will just straighten out when pulled on hard enough and then you just bend it back to shape and hang it down again.

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    Member bhollis's Avatar
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    I carry about 3' of chain and 100' of line to deal with a fouled anchor. Here's the idea:

    Wrap the chain around the anchor line so the chain forms an "eye" with the anchor line passing thru it. Then tie one end of the 100' line to the ends of the chain. Allow the chain "eye" to go down the anchor line to the fouled anchor. Position your boat on the opposite side of the anchor from which you set the anchor. Secure the end of the 100' line to cleat on your bow and begin backing down in the opposite direction from which you set the anchor. The chain "eye" should slide down the anchor stock and catch on the flukes. With a little luck, as you back down, the anchor should come out in the opposite direction from which was set.

    Never had to do this myself (and I've spent many, many nights hanging on a Bruce anchor), but a number of other folks I've talked to swear by this method.

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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    If your worried about losing a anchor while fishing just make a rebar grapple and use that, it will just straighten out when pulled on hard enough and then you just bend it back to shape and hang it down again.
    OK, I didn't want to say it because so many here utilize the Bruce anchor and I know it is very popular. Potbuilder has a good point. I mentioned the wire because when I did use that method I felt safest with the wire. Truthfully, I now have an OVERSIZED Danforth that I use most of the time. I also have a Bruce that I carry w/ as a spare (used to be my full time anchor). To me the Danforth is less headache. The rebar thing would work good as long as your on a rocky bottom. I never know where I may have to anchor could be sandy, rocky, small gravel, grassy who knows????? Depends on where you fish I guess, Cook Inlet bottom is different than PWS and I'm out in both. I mentioned in a previous post but I use the Danforth because if it does slide through the sand and hang on a rock REAL GOOD there is some give to it. Unlike a Bruce I have bent several Danforths back with a hammer when needed. Same concept Potbuilder is saying with the rebar. Use whatever works for you. I'm not trying to put down the Bruce at all. Like I said I still carry one on my boat. Just out of curiosity does anyone have a list of pros of why they use the Bruce I'm curious because up until I bought the boat I have now I always used a Danforth. I purchased my current boat used and it came with a Bruce. I did give it a good effort because people speak so highly of Bruce anchors but I just wasn't happy with it so I switched back to a Danforth. Maybe it's just me because it's what I've always used.

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by potbuilder View Post
    When its gonna blow i wouldn't be worried about hanging down my anchor and i would NEVER TRUST a piece of halibut twine, zip ties or wire to not chafe off or break when the wind is willie wahing your around in circles like the house in the wizad of oz !! I've been there too many nights in the pitch black doing that dance, the last time it happened i was staring out my windows all night like a mental patient wondering when the next blast was gonna blow me up on a rock pile. NO THANKS TO THE ZIP TIE IDEA (just my opinion) If your worried about losing a anchor while fishing just make a rebar grapple and use that, it will just straighten out when pulled on hard enough and then you just bend it back to shape and hang it down again.
    Same here. I have seen guys use bailing wire with lots of wraps. Still, not going to trust that. If doing the halibut line, I would guess you guys are talking about the 500# stuff for leaders, I think ganion line? I would use more than one for sure. You don't want that stuff breaking unless an emergency. Anchored for 5 season in PWS and Homer and had stuck anchors. You pull hard enough the will come up. I used the bouy and ring method. Once I pulled up rock in my 22# bruce style that was wedged inbetween the flukes, huge rock.

    I think like Potbuilder. Been out to many knight where you blowing around. Last thing you want on your mind is that little piece of string. It is gonna hold? Did it already break? Am I on the rocks? Drift out with the tide? NOT WORTH IT. Maybe if all you did is fish out of seward for the day and was back at the dock. Persistance is what pulled my anchors. Never broke a line, oh yeah BUY THE GOOD STUFF, DON'T BE CHEAP. NO CHINA SHACKLES. Get 3 strand braided line, Dewies is where I got mine. Good stuff.

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    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    There are a couple reasons why I use a bruce and not a danforth. I grew up commercial fishing and I have used both quite a bit. The danforth anchors bend pretty easily, and while it is true they can be made straight again, this is not an easy thing to do while you are on a sportfishing boat trying to fish. I also use the bruce because it is a more compact anchor and fits better on my boat.

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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Default Sounds strong

    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    Get 3 strand braided line,
    I never heard of a 3 strand braided line. At work we buy 3, 6, 8, and 12 strand. We also buy braided up to 1 1/4".
    I looked at the Samson Rope site and it is not shown.
    Is this a mis-type or a new rope?

    On the bailing wire to hold the rode to the anchor shaft. It seems like it could eventually cut thru the line in a storm.
    Last edited by bullbuster; 01-18-2009 at 12:33. Reason: wire comment
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  10. #10

    Default Doesn't matter if it breaks...

    Once a plow-type anchor is dug in, it doesn't matter if the cord breaks or not. The tension is still pulling back on the hook, especially if it's blowing, and its pushing the 'long shaft' end into the ground as well. If you drove your boat forward over and past the anchor, the rode attached to the elbow would 'then' and only then lift it free. Amount of scope is critical and CHAIN LENGTH to keep it flat.
    Test for a confidence boost and something to do during the winter; Set it in the yard or gravel driveway, stand back and up, like high on the deck, roof, or boat, and pull with and without the cord hooked on and see how it works.

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Meyers,

    One scenareo where it would matter is if the halibut line wore through or broke and then the wind or tide changed, and you spun around to the other side of the anchor, it would pull. I don't mean to put you down. I appreciate you taking the time to point this out, just that like with most things, there is a tradeoff. It is easier to retreive your anchor with this method, but it may be less secure in extreme conditions.

    By the way, sometimes it is the smart thing (and safer) to just cut the line. A guy I know from another forum dies just this winter off the east coast while trying to retreive a fouled anchor. His 16 year old son was with him, and details out what happened in this thread:

    http://www.aluminumalloyboats.com/vi...650dfff653d485





    Jim

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    Is there anything wrong with what myers is suggesting for day fishing. Why not use this method during the day and then when wanting to anchor up for the night just cut the zip tie or halibut line to get a safer anchor. Just a thought.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post

    By the way, sometimes it is the smart thing (and safer) to just cut the line.
    Very very true, anyone ever bent a Bruce anchor? I have..... The bent Bruce anchor is now my spare. I still feel like I should have cut the line that day rather than risk the lives of others that were on my boat. I was using the buoy and ring method. Nothing new to me, I've had hung anchors (danforths) in the past but like I said it changed my mind about the Bruce. I posted this in another thread but I bent my bow roller and mounting plate (luckily no damage to the boat itself) pulling a Bruce. After the fact I was told of the ganion line/halibut cord trick but never was truly satisfied as I had problems with breakage and anchor drag. And yes, I too have had the experience of dragging anchor in the middle of the night. When the tide turns and the cord is broken it drags for sure. Sorry, Meyers again not trying to single you out in a bad way but you had said even when the cord broke the anchor still held bottom. The cord was probably warn but still strong enough to keep the chain where it needed to be therefore the anchor was holding as designed. My guess is it finally broke when you put stress on it by pulling the anchor. Chain solely attached to the elbow of a Bruce will not hold in changing tides. No matter what anchor you use I think carrying a spare is best. I also carry an extra 200' of anchor line. I know it's hard to fork out the cash for two but if your like me it's not easy to cut an anchor loose especially if it's going to end your fishing/hunting trip. However, I don't see anything wrong with utilizing the zip tie, cord, or wire method while out day fishing. Boat Safe!!!!!

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnscd View Post
    No matter what anchor you use I think carrying a spare is best. I also carry an extra 200' of anchor line. I know it's hard to fork out the cash for two but if your like me it's not easy to cut an anchor loose especially if it's going to end your fishing/hunting trip. However, I don't see anything wrong with utilizing the zip tie, cord, or wire method while out day fishing. Boat Safe!!!!!
    I, too, carry a spare 600' of rode, 40' chain, and an extra 33 lb bruce. It eats up space, but I like the redundancy. I have yet to donate a set up to the depths with the new boat (I am older and wiser now), but did with my old searunner. Twice actually. Both times could have been avoided, but we waited too long and the tides and waves built to the point that I figured trying to free it would place myself and the others at an unnecessary risk. As far as Myers' setup goes, mine is identical. If I am anchoring in an area that is marginal, I will add a shackle to the top of the anchor where the halibut chord is and then remove it for day anchoring. It is an easy fix and takes very little time. Another tip is to secure the bolt on the shackle with stainless wire, so that it does not back out. Probably not necessary for overnight, but I love my sleep and I sleep well out there. Lots of good info in these posts. Keep them coming.
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  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    The hole at the elbow is designed for a messenger line w/bouy,...
    You're talking about a trip line.

    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    Attach your chain directly to the elbow hole with a horseshoe ring/bolt/etc
    You mean a shackle?

    In any case, I might do the opposite... attach the anchor rode and chain to the anchor as designed, then run the chain up the shank and use gangion line to secure the chain to the trip line attachment point.

    That way during the day you might be able to 'trip' the anchor easily and at night you could cut the gangion and anchor normally.

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    Member Blue Thunder's Avatar
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    Talking Anchor Saver

    I bought a Anchor Saver (which I have not tried yet) that is a sheer pin set up with shackles to attach to the anchor eye and chain. You can get different sheer pin strengths for bigger boats. The pins are easily changed if you sheer one. No worry about halibut cord, zip ties, wire, or what ever breaking. I'm not saying this is the answer, because I have not tried it yet, but I think it is going to work great. The thing is called Anchor Saver phone 239-877-4080 and a web sight anchorsaver.com Take a look and see what you think and let me know what your opinion is.

  17. #17

    Default Plow/claw

    At a boat store today, I had a thought that might clear some of the fog away from the cord/anchor theory of my original post. The anchor I cord-up is the Bruce-"claw" type, really it is not a actual "plow" shape, yet works the same. The "plow-type", laid on its side doesn't have the three claws like a Bruce, thus may not hook the same. The claw, actually has three spade shapes that splay out catching ground if laid sideways. Sorry if this sounds contradicting to my original post.
    Years ago when you paid to go to the boat show, (it filled all the Sullivan and ice rink), a big glass tank complete with water and sand displayed that anchor design in action. Once you see that display it makes sense.
    Use proper amount of scope, proper amount of chain, and when you set the thing back down on it very aggressively.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Thunder View Post
    I bought a Anchor Saver (which I have not tried yet) that is a sheer pin set up with shackles to attach to the anchor eye and chain. You can get different sheer pin strengths for bigger boats. The pins are easily changed if you sheer one. No worry about halibut cord, zip ties, wire, or what ever breaking. I'm not saying this is the answer, because I have not tried it yet, but I think it is going to work great. The thing is called Anchor Saver phone 239-877-4080 and a web sight anchorsaver.com Take a look and see what you think and let me know what your opinion is.
    Nice gadget Looks like it should work but i'd bet that many times when your anchor is hung down its the chain wrapped around the rocks or wedged under a rock from the boat swinging on the anchor. That release ain't gonna do you any good then.

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    Just a thought everyone after reading all these posts - why rely on JUST the attachment at the tip of the anchor post with gangion line, wire or zip ties? How about multiple attachments along the arm of the anchor arm with the same things (gangion, wire or zip ties that are slightly weaker) that will still be effective if only one or two wears out due to swinging on the hook in a storm but you would still be able to break if your anchor is stuck HARD on the bottom. We all check the weather and could add appropriate wraps of whatever material we choose for anchoring for those conditions .

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Here is another forum where I think they are describing the same basic thing, with pictures to make it a bit clearer:

    http://floridasportfishing.com/magaz...y-stuck-2.html

    Jim

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