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Thread: Multi-Axle Trailers

  1. #1

    Default Multi-Axle Trailers

    What is the best way to jack up a multi-axle trailer if you need to change a tire? What equipment should be with you while towing?
    What-a-Day
    27' x 9.5' Glacier Craft - Volvo 300hp D4 Diesel
    Remember: Any fool can be uncomfortable.
    Denny

  2. #2
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Default

    Judging by the Glacier Craft you own in your post I'd say your semi tow rig ought to have a pneumanic jack. For the rest of us a huge but cheap bottle jack and a 6x6 to spread the weight ought to lift and hold up a whole side of a trailer, or put that bottle jack under the offending axle and lift that one up.

    Sobie2

  3. #3
    Member TWB's Avatar
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    I'd buy a compact floor jack kit. Several brands come in a plastic case these days.
    We do not go to the green woods and crystal waters to rough it, we go to smooth it. We get it rough enough at home; in towns and cities; in shops, offices, stores, banks anywhere that we may be placed

  4. #4

    Default One Axle

    Can you jack up one axle and not hurt anything?

    I have also seen blocks that you put in front of two axles and drive the two good tires up on them. Anyone use these?
    What-a-Day
    27' x 9.5' Glacier Craft - Volvo 300hp D4 Diesel
    Remember: Any fool can be uncomfortable.
    Denny

  5. #5

    Default Blocks are the way to go

    I jack up trailers this way a couple times a week.
    If you have torsion axles you have no worries!
    If you have leaf springs first look at the way all of the shackels are hanging (there are 2 possible setups for triple axle) and when you set it back down make sure they hang correctly again usually there is no problem when only raising one side but doing things on the side of the road all bets are off.
    I generally use 3 2x8s under each tire, stagered so you can climb up on them, with your load you may need 4, since you are using them on just one trailer screw them together for ease of use and try them in your driveway or a nice flat parking lot before you need them.

    It's nice to think of this before you have to actually do it.
    19' Lowe Roughneck
    90/65 Honda 4 stroke
    Outboard Jet

  6. #6

    Default Jacks easier than you can imagine

    Two seasons ago: Got to the Hope cut off, one drum completely exploded from the break being locked and heating the metal to complete destruction, only thing keeping the tire and rim from flying down the highway is the fender trapped it. I drove home with only three wheels on a dual axle trailer with the Sea Sport and all its fat! Yes, multi-axle trailers jack up easily, yes, they disperse the weight nicely, yes you can make it home on three out of the four wheels. Heck, if you have a tripple-axle trailer you don't even have to stop until you get to the ramp! (Seward -doesn't have any "rescue" hubs/axles/bearings/rims/drums/etc... I've investigated that throughly, so save yourself the aggrevation and drag it back to Anchorage.)

  7. #7
    Member Tolman24's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    Two seasons ago: Got to the Hope cut off, one drum completely exploded from the break being locked and heating the metal to complete destruction, only thing keeping the tire and rim from flying down the highway is the fender trapped it. I drove home with only three wheels on a dual axle trailer with the Sea Sport and all its fat! Yes, multi-axle trailers jack up easily, yes, they disperse the weight nicely, yes you can make it home on three out of the four wheels. Heck, if you have a tripple-axle trailer you don't even have to stop until you get to the ramp! (Seward -doesn't have any "rescue" hubs/axles/bearings/rims/drums/etc... I've investigated that throughly, so save yourself the aggrevation and drag it back to Anchorage.)
    I was in the same position in Seward last year. I jacked up the offending axle using a bottle jack. Removed the tire, used a 1" ratchet strap to hold the axle in the general position as the other one and drug it home. This was on a 24' Tolman with a double axle trailer. Pulled pretty darn well. My trailer is oversized for the load so my axle was within tolerances.

  8. #8

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    Yep, I used a ratchet strap also, carry a pile of em' there handy.

  9. #9
    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Gret topic, but you guys are loosing me. I am in the same situation. I will have a triple axle trailer. It seems like if I am jacking just one axle to lift the side, then I will be overloading that axle, right? I also don't follow the ratchet strap concept. Is the idea for if you loose a hub and want to drop one of the three tires and just run on two. Glad this was brought up now instead of when I am sitting at the side of the highway trying to figure it out.

    Jim

  10. #10

    Default

    On our old boat with a triple axle trailer we always had to change the tires becuase they wore unevenly, so we always made sure to have 6-8 2x6 boards that were about a foot long each, maybe longer. Just stack them on whatever side the flat is on and put one of the good tires ontop of it. That always does the trick and is normaly a lot faster then getting out the jack.

    THe jack method we have used was to get a 4x4 block 2 feet long and put the jack under it and put it right on the frame of the trailer. That lifts all tires of course, but it worked also. That was a 20,000lb bottle jack I believe.

  11. #11
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Default strap or chain

    Jrodgers,
    You are correct. Remove the bad tire, and ratchet strap the axle up so it will not make contact w/the pavement and continue on down the road. I know of others that use chain and a chain binder but I don't see why a heavy duty strap wouldn't suffice.
    BK

  12. #12
    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    I have a triple axle too, weighing nearly 12,000 lb. I've used the jack up the frame method as griff describes, with a 12,000 lb bottle jack, countless times now over 11 years. It easily lifts one side or the other, as long as the trailer is not hitched up to the truck.
    Richard Cook
    New Moon (Bounty 257)
    "Cruising in a Big Way"

  13. #13
    Member Tolman24's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrogers View Post
    Gret topic, but you guys are loosing me. I am in the same situation. I will have a triple axle trailer. It seems like if I am jacking just one axle to lift the side, then I will be overloading that axle, right? I also don't follow the ratchet strap concept. Is the idea for if you loose a hub and want to drop one of the three tires and just run on two. Glad this was brought up now instead of when I am sitting at the side of the highway trying to figure it out.

    Jim
    Yes in my case it was because of loosing a hub and needed to come home on three legs, or tires. In my case with a double axle my boat is light enough that a single axle will carry the weight so i don't have to worry about overloading the axle. I would think that you might be able to get home on 5 of your six tires if you lost a hub by chaining or strapping up an axle. I would probably jack it up using the frame in order to change a tire, or drive onto blocks with the other 2 tires.

  14. #14

    Default jrogers?

    To answer the other part of your question about over loading your other axle while jacking up one, the answer is no problem, the trailer and axles are capabale of handling much more load while sitting static, you put much greater forces on your axles when you hit a bump, pothole or frost heave while going (55) down the road. one more caution also if running on 3 or 5 tires takie it easy since you are reducing the load carrying capacity of you trailer between 1700# and 3200# depending on your Axle/tire size.
    19' Lowe Roughneck
    90/65 Honda 4 stroke
    Outboard Jet

  15. #15

    Default

    I carry a mini-floor jack, (I need to carry one a little bigger.) I jacked up the axle tight, then strapped it, this helped limit the "dangle factor" when going down the road. I will say I had a (unofficial) pilot car follow me home, I drove extremely slow! I had to pull off the fender because it rubbed the tire on the single wheel side. It was beyond maxed out with the one wheel! My trailer is a "Magnum", glavanized C-channel constructed, welded everywhere, no bolt-on crap, solid! But, the boat is heavy and I was watching the tires more than the road all the way home.

  16. #16
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    I carry an item called a Jiffy Jack. Basically you pull the trailer tire of the tandem that is not flat onto the Jiffy Jack, take off the bad tire, put your spare on, pull the trailer off of the jack and you are done.

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  18. #18
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Default loosing a hub

    I have thought about loosing a hub on the road, so I ordered what King Trailers calls the “ELIMINATOR” SPINDLE & HUB SPARE TIRE CARRIER
    "For the best security on the road. Includes hub, pre-greased bearings , spindle and spare tire." Here is a link: http://www.kingtrailers.com/options.html
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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