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Thread: Need to anchor deep, 200ft +

  1. #1

    Default Need to anchor deep, 200ft +

    I want to put an anchor pulpit, windlass, and rope locker on my Hewescraft Ocean Pro. Anyone with pic's or suggestions?

    This is my first post on a forum, hope I did it right.

  2. #2
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    You do not need to have a windlass to anchor in 200'+. I have anchored as deep as 400' out in PWS and pull with a bouy. It has not been an issue. An easy pull anchor puller would be nice, though. If you go the windlass route make sure you have a ring and bouy to pull the ancor if/when the windlass craps out on you.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    You do not need to have a windlass to anchor in 200'+. I have anchored as deep as 400' out in PWS and pull with a bouy. It has not been an issue. An easy pull anchor puller would be nice, though. If you go the windlass route make sure you have a ring and bouy to pull the ancor if/when the windlass craps out on you.
    As usual, I completely agree. You really don't have a windlass on your boat? Really? Somebody pinch me or something. I thought it had everything I concede that I have one too.....normally they rotate in and out, are about 5 feet 8 inches tall, and are wearing an orange life vest....... If they do a good job, I let them back in the cabin too!

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default ouy

    I pull with a bouy and have 600' on the boat. And at times use it. Some day I expect someone to cut between me and the bouy. :-)

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  5. #5

    Smile

    I have a three-foot anchor pulpit on my Sea Sport with the railing all the way around it. You can walk right out on it and dive off if you want, usually I just pee off it.
    Since you brought it up and I just remembered, I discovered that the pulpit is a fantastic wave cutter! This summer we went out of Seward during a "small craft advisory" to try and kill ourselves. We were hitting a series of eight waves and then a set of three, the eight were houses, and the three were buildings! The pulpit was splitting the waves when we crashed down, it kept the bow from digging and scooping. It was as if the boat was three feet longer, and technically it is. If you want to add a bit of a "safety net" with function, get an anchor pulpit.

    I use the bouy, my rode is to large for the windless. I anchor very deep, Homer, Pony cove, all over Seward, PWS, 600ft and lots of chain gets it done!

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by T.R. Bauer View Post
    As usual, I completely agree. You really don't have a windlass on your boat? Really? Somebody pinch me or something. I thought it had everything I concede that I have one too.....normally they rotate in and out, are about 5 feet 8 inches tall, and are wearing an orange life vest....... If they do a good job, I let them back in the cabin too!
    Funny stuff, TR! I couldn't justify the extra $3500 for the easy pull anchor puller. I had to stop somewhere, you know. It really is not that bad pulling in the slack. The bouy does all the heavy work...that is until the hands meet the chain. Then there is 40' of 3/8 chain and a 33 pound bruce style anchor. I sleep well at night with this set up.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    we have a windlass on our 30' Sea Sport and use it a lot, after I pull it up with bouy and ring. the windlass work if your on a soft bottom and not much current. if you get the pick stuck you're going to want to be able to use the boats weight and force to help with the anchor. just my thoughts
    Boatless

  8. #8

    Red face

    Im pretty sure the Ocean pro has the same locker configuration as my 22HT ET. This is how I did mine. The locker holds 600' of 1/2 anchor rope and 30' of chain. I would have liked to mount the windlass up on the diamond plate, but there was no direct access to the locker. It has worked out very well, with zero problems. Being lazy in nature its a lot easier to flip a switch to pull the anchor.
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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default Do I really need a windlass?

    Funny, I was just getting ready to post this question. In the past I have used the ring and buoy with 600' of line.

    On my 30' Sea Ray, I am finishing up the bow pulpit (Until recently I didn't even know that was what it was called!) which is Teak.

    I had asked a big boat friend of mine in Florida about the need for a windlass. He asked me: Do you really need it? If you are pulling up 400-600' of line, chain and anchor, is a windless going to be able to do the job at 35 amps and rated at 700lbs? If you are running an engine and/or generator to keep the battery charged maybe. With this much line and weight will you burn up the windlass?

    Is it worth the cost of $900?

    So for all of those PWS experts, is a windlass necessary and needed in Alaska. If I were in Florida and anchoring in 150' or less maybe.

    Jonsboat: When I get finished I will send you some pictures. You can Google "bow Pulpit" and find a lot of parts. because I was dealing with Teak, this guy quoted me $1600 for a new bow pulpit. I refinished what I had.

    See: http://www.woodworkingforwatercraft.com/pulpit.html

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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    Member captaindd's Avatar
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    I use an Ez Anchor puller and would not have a boat that does not have some kind of front winch. I carry a bouy as back up. My anchor puller cost about $2000 then add the cost of the line, anchor, and chain. I have about 450ft of 3/8 anchor line. It is just easier to pull the anchor with. You can sit in the cab of your boat and with the puller and the engines makes it easy. The only thing I wished I could do is dead drop the anchor instead of power up and power down.

  11. #11
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by captaindd View Post
    The only thing I wished I could do is dead drop the anchor instead of power up and power down.
    The Lewmar H700 Pro-Series has dead drop feature.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    The Lewmar H700 Pro-Series has dead drop feature.

    our lewmar ( I forgot the model) is power up and down or drop down. If you don't have a drop down it's going to be real tough to get on your spots when the current is ripping. thats the only reason I don't loke the easy pull. I think everyonme knows how hrd it can be to get right where you want on those way points.
    Boatless

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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FISHFACE View Post
    our lewmar ( I forgot the model) is power up and down or drop down. If you don't have a drop down it's going to be real tough to get on your spots when the current is ripping. thats the only reason I don't loke the easy pull. I think everyonme knows how hrd it can be to get right where you want on those way points.
    I can feel the pain. Heck it's hard enough to get on that spot when you just throw the anchor overboard and try to avoid the rope!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  14. #14

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    the free fall feature is nice to have, but most boats in the 24-30 foot range dont have an anchor locker big enough to hold 600 feet of rode while still having enough room for the rope to uncoil itself on the way out. Our last two boats we had to constantly reach into the locker and make sure the rope wasnt getting tangled on the way out. and when we retrieve the anchor, we have had to keep pushing the rope side to side every 10 feet or so to prevent it from coiling up at the top of the locker.

    This is all due to lack of depth in the locker. if it had enough room to fall side to side it would be fine. We have the lewmar 700 pro series stainless and it is great. We've only got the anchor stuck one time, and it was in some serious clay. We used the buoy as a backup and it stopped us dead in our tracks and the boat did a 180. luckily it didnt rip off the cleat. We had to put the boat right above the anchor and put the engines in reverse, full throttle and it took about an hour of doing that in various directions before it came free.

    PS...dacron cord is not the best thing to use if you have a bruce style anchor. It does NOT break very easily....

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonsboat View Post
    I want to put an anchor pulpit, windlass, and rope locker on my Hewescraft Ocean Pro. Anyone with pic's or suggestions?

    This is my first post on a forum, hope I did it right.
    How big of an anchor are we talking about?
    On our 22ft C-dory the main anchor is a 16lb Bruce with 30ft of chain and 1/2in line, we pull it by hand no problem-fact the wife is usually the one. My backup/fishing anchor is a 12lb Bruce with 10ft of chain and 3/8in line, its set-up with a release. I figure if the weather is so bad a 12lb Bruce won’t hold me on the fishing spot I shouldn’t be out fishing. Both have 600 feet of line and if the motor conks in deep water I can double that, a nice safety net.

    I’ve got he anchor buoy pulling device but only use it for the shrimp pots.

    On the other hand, if I we’re out by myself the windless would be handy, or if I fished on anchor a lot.

    I configured my set-up to work with a windless if I every decided to install one, so if you’re considering one most require 1/2in line with 1/4in chain. There are different chains out there so make sure it’s compatible with the windless you’re considering; good anchor chains expensive.
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  16. #16

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    Thanks everyone for the input.
    I need to figure out this anchor buoy pulling device you all are talking about. It sounds like a good backup for when I need to use the old back. I've surfed around a bit looking for info on it, any suggestions where I find a good discription?

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    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonsboat View Post
    Thanks everyone for the input.
    I need to figure out this anchor buoy pulling device you all are talking about. It sounds like a good backup for when I need to use the old back. I've surfed around a bit looking for info on it, any suggestions where I find a good discription?
    Here yea go:

    http://www.savvyboater.com/p-2116-anchor-lift-pro-heavy-duty-anchor-puller.aspx

    https://www.savvyboater.com/p-42-anchor-ring-anchor-retriever.aspx

    http://www.orvalsezpull.com/
    Jay
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  18. #18
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonsboat View Post
    Thanks everyone for the input.
    I need to figure out this anchor buoy pulling device you all are talking about. It sounds like a good backup for when I need to use the old back. I've surfed around a bit looking for info on it, any suggestions where I find a good discription?
    Buoy retrieval works like this:

    First your chain has to weigh more than your anchor. I have a large stainless ring that you pass your anchor rope through.

    I free fall my anchor, so before I place my anchor over I make sure the ring is snapped to a buoy. When you get ready to leave, you start your motor(s) and start to head in a 45 degree angle to your rope. This pushes the buoy down the rope and brings the anchor to the top. The anchor is too large to pass through the ring and the chain is heavier than the anchor so when the chain passes through the ring it keeps the anchor from going back down to the bottom. I have someone watching because as the anchor hits the surface, you can tell when it hits the ring and buoy.

    Now you have 600' of slack line floating on top of the water with the buoy holding the anchor and chain. The commercial guys have been using this method for years. There is a plastic gismo that does the same as the ring but, then again it is plastic.

    The water is cold, so I have a pair of insulated waterproof gloves to bring in the rope.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

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    Member spoiled one's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonsboat View Post
    Thanks everyone for the input.
    I need to figure out this anchor buoy pulling device you all are talking about. It sounds like a good backup for when I need to use the old back. I've surfed around a bit looking for info on it, any suggestions where I find a good discription?
    I use a heavy stainless ring that has about a 6" diameter. I run this through the rode. I have a big stainless carabiner on a 4' or so shot of poly braid. This is attached to the buoy and clipped to the ring. It is important to clip the buoy to the ring before sending it into the drink. I always keep it attached to the ring, but carry a backup just in case. I do not want to pull my set up from 200'+ by hand. I purchased the ring from Kachemak Gear shed in Homer. I have seen lighter ones in town but I like the set up I am using. Hope this makes sense.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    Buoy retrieval works like this:

    First your chain has to weigh more than your anchor. I have a large stainless ring that you pass your anchor rope through.

    I free fall my anchor, so before I place my anchor over I make sure the ring is snapped to a buoy. When you get ready to leave, you start your motor(s) and start to head in a 45 degree angle to your rope. This pushes the buoy down the rope and brings the anchor to the top. The anchor is too large to pass through the ring and the chain is heavier than the anchor so when the chain passes through the ring it keeps the anchor from going back down to the bottom. I have someone watching because as the anchor hits the surface, you can tell when it hits the ring and buoy.

    Now you have 600' of slack line floating on top of the water with the buoy holding the anchor and chain. The commercial guys have been using this method for years. There is a plastic gismo that does the same as the ring but, then again it is plastic.

    The water is cold, so I have a pair of insulated waterproof gloves to bring in the rope.
    We must have been typing at the same time. Good description on the actual retrieval. With my setup, there is no mistaking when the anchor meets the buoy. You just look for the "bobber" to go down. One other thing I might add is at the start of the retrieval , I like to wait until the anchor is unhung before I start pouring the coals to her. Nothing like doing a quick 180 on the water. I might spill my coffee!
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

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