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Thread: Rhino Lining Floor boards

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Default Rhino Lining Floor boards

    I am thinking about having the plywood sprayed with Rhino lining, as is, its 5/8 vinyl covered plywood, I am thinking about removing the vinyl and having them sprayed with Rhino liner truck bed stuff.
    Anyone tried this?

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    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default YES

    it works great..
    I had my plywood seats for my rafting frames sprayed with the stuff 15 years ago..
    It works great..
    One thing to remember.. If you are going to drill holes in the wood, or if you already have holes, think about drilling them out a little bigger and putting a sleeve in the holes, like aluminum pipe etc. cut them so that when you spray the Rhino hide on the boards, you are not going to have any issues with water getting trapped in the capsillated wood. That is the only advice I can give.. If you drill holes later, you need to be able to seal them so no water can get to the wood,... you get the idea..
    Max
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    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  3. #3

    Wink

    Weigh them, then weigh them a year later or whenever to see if they absorbed water. Lift a plank of pressure treated lumber, stuff is heavy, makes you think about water intrusion.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Default

    Thanks for the info. I am in the interior and will call Vertex on monday and see what they charge to spray 3 sheets.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    Thanks for the info. I am in the interior and will call Vertex on monday and see what they charge to spray 3 sheets.
    I am really curious about this as well. - Any idea about the weight it would add as well? Curious how much that stuff weighs if you do a large area.

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    Default

    did this in my 20' koffler bay bee, instead of having it sprayed in i went to NAPA and got 2 gallon containers of roll in bed lining material, about 100$ per gallon, lasted for about 3 years of heavy use and obvoiusly wore down in the heavily traveled areas, i was chartering with the boat. guy that bought it went over it with more of the same material and has been using it for pleasure for the last 3 years. looks like it was just put in.
    really nice feature as it is not slippery when wet, and is inexpensive if you do it yourself.

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    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Default

    I just spoke to Vertex and they figure around 200-250 to do one side and the edges. Adds about 20 pounds, depending on how smooth the plywood is to start with.
    He also said part of the expense is getting equipment preped and ready to go for a small job, so if anyone in Fairbanks wants to tag along and reduce the cost send me a PM.
    He has black or gray, I probably could go either way on the color.
    Since I started checking I have had several people tell me they have had it done or know someone who has had it on a boat floor over cdx, and has been holding up well, a couple have even said its been on for 15 years, seems like a long time to me.
    Oh, My boat floor is 3 pieces 4' X 5' and a couple of smaller pieces, the boat is a 20' X 60"

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    Default Herculiner

    Herculiner is only $75-85 a gallon and would be enough to do all you have 1 side..I have done my raft seat planks 1 1/8" plywood CDX and they still are light as when I made them 3 1/2yrs ago with heavy use..Also just done my Wooldridge with the same stuff on 5/8" ply & still lighter than marine ply + Cheaper.Reilly

    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    I just spoke to Vertex and they figure around 200-250 to do one side and the edges. Adds about 20 pounds, depending on how smooth the plywood is to start with.
    He also said part of the expense is getting equipment preped and ready to go for a small job, so if anyone in Fairbanks wants to tag along and reduce the cost send me a PM.
    He has black or gray, I probably could go either way on the color.
    Since I started checking I have had several people tell me they have had it done or know someone who has had it on a boat floor over cdx, and has been holding up well, a couple have even said its been on for 15 years, seems like a long time to me.
    Oh, My boat floor is 3 pieces 4' X 5' and a couple of smaller pieces, the boat is a 20' X 60"

  9. #9

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    Gramps,
    The company your going with is it actually Rhino lining or is it another product? I would make sure the one you are going with is a hot applied product and not a cold one that is polyurethane based. I used to own a company that applied a cold based polyurethane coating which did not hold up well against constant water.

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    Default

    Thanks for the heads up, I will have to find out.

    Quote Originally Posted by 79FSJ View Post
    Gramps,
    The company your going with is it actually Rhino lining or is it another product? I would make sure the one you are going with is a hot applied product and not a cold one that is polyurethane based. I used to own a company that applied a cold based polyurethane coating which did not hold up well against constant water.

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    Default

    This sounds like a good idea. I have wondered how it would work myself. A couple years ago I helped my dad put new flooring in his boat. We used diamond plating and it turned out nice but was expensive and definitely added some weight. It is also slick once you get some slime on board. This seems like it might be a better option just not as shiny.
    Ryan Tollefsen
    Prudential Jack White Vista Real Estate

    Alaska Real Estate
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    Default

    I've had a few pickups with different brands of sprayed-in bed liners. One was tacky when wet. One was unbelievably slippery when wet. The others were in between. I don't know which was which. It all looked the same. I'd ask for a sample and see how slippery a specific product gets when wet before I'd consider it for a boat.

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    The first spray in liner I ever got was from the guys in Anchorage on 5th ave (Alaska Cap) who no longer are on that corner. They used a very small amount of very fine sand on the surface while it was still wet. This gave a fantastic grip in all weather conditions. I would think you could do that with any liner you use. The only down side is that it is like sand paper on bare feet or knees when crawling. My current Rhino brand liner can be very slippery when a layer or ice gets on it...
    "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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    Question rhinohide for leaking rivets?

    Hi i'm new on this forum, I had what i think might be a good idea to fix the leaking rivets on my 18 ft. aluminum runabout. the hull is an older starcraft riveted boat. I really like it so i looked into welding seams and rivets, it seems to me that would require a lot of time and expense to "maybe" fix the problem. if there were only one or two leaks maybe but my hull has a few more than that! then i saw a friend who had rhinohide sprayed on his truckbed and that stuff is darn near bullet proof! my idea is to remove my floorboards, chip out the now soggy floatation foam and spray the interior of the boat with the coating to seal all the rivets and leaks. it seems like it would be a durable cost effective way of fixing the problem. if anyone has any input ie, have they tried this, or ideas i would like to hear from them, thanks Mike

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    Default "Paint"

    Frb Paint has some "paint" that is great. I forget the name; Tough Tex? It is gray, and goes on very lumpy, which gives it grip. I put it on my riverboat several years ago and it is lasting real well. It is made for non-slip surfaces. About $40/gallon. Apply outside, as it stinks something wicked (potent solvent in it). I used a roller.

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr.mike View Post
    Hi i'm new on this forum, I had what i think might be a good idea to fix the leaking rivets on my 18 ft. aluminum runabout. the hull is an older starcraft riveted boat. I really like it so i looked into welding seams and rivets, it seems to me that would require a lot of time and expense to "maybe" fix the problem. if there were only one or two leaks maybe but my hull has a few more than that! then i saw a friend who had rhinohide sprayed on his truckbed and that stuff is darn near bullet proof! my idea is to remove my floorboards, chip out the now soggy floatation foam and spray the interior of the boat with the coating to seal all the rivets and leaks. it seems like it would be a durable cost effective way of fixing the problem. if anyone has any input ie, have they tried this, or ideas i would like to hear from them, thanks Mike
    Mike,
    The only product i would do this with is a hot applied liner material such as rhino lining. The problem with using a cold application or mostly urethane (rubbery) based material is that it does flex.... This may allow water in when and if the boat flexes. A hot application liner doesnt flex and usually cracks before it will flex.
    I had the same idea you did when i first started doing bedliners. I lined my entire 14ft john boat. It lasted well for a good 6 months then water started to bubble up the urethane in places. btw i owner a cold application based system.

    Larry

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    Default Sand grit

    Roger45, I did the same with my 18' riverboat. Painted two coats, second with the sand mixed in. Third coat had a little sand in it but mostly paint. Third coat kept the sand on the floor much longer. Does not get slippery, even when dipnetting on a smoking hot day, full of water, slime and scales. Just hose it out. A cheaper way by far.

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    Default rhinohide?

    hey thanks for the input. Larry was it rhinohide that you used on the interior of your johnboat? I watched a tv. program where they constructed a wall out of cinderblocks , sprayed the backside with rhinohide then launched some kind of missile at it.... the wall got smashed to bits,stayed upright and the rhinohide was intact on the backside...incredible. I reckon that if it adheres well to the inside of the hull on well cleaned and dry aluminum then water would have a hard time finding its way in....I hope! thanks again Mike.

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    Default do your best and caulk the rest

    i have a little 16' lund that is like a 1980's vintage and it has been hammered on, literally. the rivets are real loose.but I have found that getting under the skiff on the trailer and caulking all the seams from the outside with a high quality 100 silicone or better , 3m 5200, makes her keep the water out pretty good and it is relativly cheap as opposed to the rhino liner or herculiner. that herculiner worked real good on the plywood seats and waterproofs the wood-just dry her out good before. -- just my opinion but when trying to waterproof, it makes more sense to me to apply the waterproofing to the outside rather than the inside. also keep an automatic bilge on the old leaky lund.

  20. #20
    Member Akgramps's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akgramps View Post
    Thanks for the heads up, I will have to find out.
    Talked to the applicator today it is a hot polyurea application, in this case a 1 coat application. The texture can vary and that will affect how slippery it ends up.
    I plan to get this done sometime in the next 2-4 weeks, so if any one else in Fairbanks is interested in "tagging on" it would make it a little cheaper than just doing one set of floorboards.
    If interested PM me.
    John

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