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Thread: Who hunts with....

  1. #1

    Default Who hunts with....

    Shooting sticks? We all know resting that rifle on something stationary, (rock, blowdown, back pack, etc.) helps to stabilize those long shots better than offhand shooting. How many guys specifically carry some type of bi-pod, tri pod, or shooting stick support on their hunts? I've used a Harris bi-pod before but am not fond of the weight involved.I was looking at this item: http://www.snipepod.com/ and thought there might be some potential there for rifle hunting. I particularly like the idea that once one of the devices is purchased, multiple attachment points can be purchased for each rifle in the safe and the device can be switched from rifle to rifle. Folds up pretty nice and fairly light weight at only 6 ounces for the 30" sitting version.So how many of you crack-shots out there use something like this?

  2. #2

    Default After....

    hunting in Africa and shooting off shooting sticks, I ALWAYS have a set made for my kids when we are out hunting. I just take 3 small trees and wrap a bungee around the top. I carry them and when the shot is ready, I set them up and the kids rest the rifle on it and shoot. I try myself to ALWAYS shoot off a rest if possible. I am a bad off hand shot.

  3. #3
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Default shooting sticks

    I'll start off ...with I never use shooting sticks. About 200 animals have been shot off my backpack . Mostly my pack gets thrown down on a little high spot or on top of a rock. Only twice has it been used in an upright position, similar to shooting off sticks.

    On a half dozen occasions client-hunters have brought shooting sticks and twice thay have been used. And one time, shooting sharply downhill from a grassey hillside at a moose, they were really necessary.

    I do not use bipods either. For me they are just one more thing to get caught-up in the alder brush. But I can see how they could be useful for ultra long range shooting. Several clients have brought them along and removed them from their rifle after a day. I can only remember them being used one time on a routine kill.

    Most of my hunts are either in rocky area for sheep or goats or for brown bears and caribou on the tundra. With the absence of high grass, shooting sticks have usually been unnecessary.

    I don't do many gadgets. I get by without shooting sticks and bipods, but like the prior thread on trekking poles, many forum contributers will probably "support" their use as affective aids to shooting accuracy.

    But in the support of sticks and bipods...many hunter and shooters today did not grow up learing to shoot from different position. Occasionally a hunter arrives and he has only shot off a bench rest at a rifle range. I have had to explain what "shooting from a prone position" means a few times. Perhaps I could have explained about "shooting off sticks" even easier.

    If you like 'em and have practiced off sticks then you will probably use 'em and shoot great.

    Dennis
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  4. #4
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I figure it outdoor shows started showing trap and skeet shooting useing shooting sticks the public would run for them. I would think after watching the pros on T,V. fumble most every shot getting sticks lined up you could just sit down and take a shot.Yes sometimes the brush is to high to sit down so why not just use the brush insted of a stick.Spring loaded walking stick in one hand shooting sticks in the other and all the other new age stuff in the new age backpack just ain't my style but I do like breach loaders.

  5. #5

    Default

    I've used a couple of rifles (borrowed) that had bipods. Hated them, threw off the rifles balance, heavy, and hard to adjust in a hurry. I like to carry shooting sticks though, Stoney Point is the brand name I think. Don't need them all the time, but it's nice to have them. Especially when you're in a flat swampy area with grass a foot or two tall, like the north side of the Peninsula.
    Mark

  6. #6
    Member SoggyMountain's Avatar
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    In my hunting area I have a hard time keeping sticks out of my barrel, finger guard, backpack straps, and eyeballs. I've no desire to see anymore sticks - shooting or otherwise.
    "...just because we didn't agree with you doesn't mean we didn't have good discussion. It just means you missed it." -JMG-

  7. #7

    Default Tried and Didnt Like Them

    I bought a set out of curiosity, and taook them with me here in MD when hunting gray squirrels and fox squirrels with my .22 Mag. After carrying them in my left hand for a season, I found that it was exceedingly rare for me to find a good opportunity to use them, that wasn'r beeter served by me kneeling and using my knee, or using a tree or some other natural feature as a rest. So, I stopped carrying them, and never did carry them on a big game hunt. Have never had a situation where I thought "Man, I wish I'd have had shooting sticks for that shot!"

  8. #8
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Default Shooting sticks...

    I used one last year as my buddy's in-laws gave him one the previous Christmas. I used it to shoot a bull at 85-100 yards, (one shot with the .444 XLR) kneeling. Guess it worked ok. My buddy uses it as a walking staff/shooting rest. I would/could have easily shot the bull kneeling without the staff.

    The staff didn't add any weight to our hunt as it wasn't an issue. It may be more useful for a sheep hunt for support and taking longer shots; my last sheep hunt I used my .338 as a walking stick for support while side-hilling and climbing a mountain. Either way, I didn't think it was a necessary item for our moose hunt.

    Hopefully I attached a pic (posed-taken after the actual shot).

    Tim
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    Last edited by tccak71; 01-10-2009 at 20:56. Reason: grammar

  9. #9

    Default And that's why....

    this forum is so great. We get to draw upon the life experiences of many. The pros and cons are weighed and each man benefits from the experience of the other.

    Thank you to all who responded. I think that back pack, boulder, and blow-down will continue to see use as my rifle rest.

  10. #10
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Rainforest approach

    I've decided that I'm gonna give up on using a rest unless it's available or I've got time while hunting in the rainforest on shots less than 100 yrds. Anything outside of that distance I'm using a pack, rock, tree, something to get settled in. I got use to settling in for a long shot after a month or so in the alpine this year and then went down into the brush for the rut and blew a shot on a good buck because I was more focused on getting a rest than shooting properly. Just following the fundamentals of target procurment, stance, safety, and breathing works wonders within 100 yrds with good rifle. After that decision it was smooth sailing and the freezers full for the year. I'm not advocating this approach unless you've practiced.

    It must be like dealing with any perfomance problem....If you can clearly visulize success and practice your likely to find it.

    If your skilled at using sticks more power to ya. For me I'd rather carry a few extra candy bars. My .02

  11. #11

    Talking monopod

    You ought to give a monopod a try. They also double as a walking staff. In my experience, there isn't always a rock, tree or other support available, and I'd like to see just how great a backpack would be in tall brush, sagebrush or devil's club. One can easily shoot uphill or downhill with them, and if one is walking on snowy, icy or rocky terrain, an extra third "leg" tp help keep one's balance, is invaluable. Try one before pooh pawing it.
    If you like getting kicked by a mule...then you'll "love" shooting my .458.

  12. #12
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maydog View Post
    You ought to give a monopod a try.
    Got a pict of one?

    Tim

  13. #13
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bighorse View Post
    If your skilled at using sticks more power to ya. For me I'd rather carry a few extra candy bars. My .02
    Me to.

    BTW, solid advice.

    Tim

    p.s. love paddin' my posts; can't figure out how or if I can do quotes from two members in one of my posts.
    Last edited by tccak71; 01-10-2009 at 22:57. Reason: addition

  14. #14

    Smile stix and stuff

    I have been hauling a pair of fold up ones around for 3 years. Never used them yet. I know they could come in handy though. Same with the Leica range finder. Come to think of it. I'm not so sure I need that GPS and sat. phone either. No wonder my pack is heavy, and I thought I was getting older!

  15. #15
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    I used to carry a set of Stoney Piont shooting sticks when I was hunting in Oklahoma for tall grass and lack of trees, ( if youve been to western Ok you know what I mean). They were also useful in Colorado for those cross canyon shots, if I hadnt had a set I doubt I would have been able to hit my last elk without them. They come with a little case that slides onto your belt to carry them for quick access, and being made of aluminum they dont weigh as much as two candy bars, one if thier the king size bars. I think that they are a good accessory but I keep losing mine before season and finding them right at the start of winter, guess I need to get organized.

  16. #16
    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    I have been hauling a pair of fold up ones around for 3 years. Never used them yet. I know they could come in handy though. Same with the Leica range finder. Come to think of it. I'm not so sure I need that GPS and sat. phone either. No wonder my pack is heavy, and I thought I was getting older!
    LMAO!
    I haven't gotten a range finder as I don't find it too useful for rifle hunting, maybe for bow hunting, but I don't bow hunt. I was questioning bringing my GPS (as I am familiar with the area I hunt) but it was real handy trying to find camp in the pitch black.

    Tim

  17. #17
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    Default

    Since I carry a walking stick most of the time now and hunt with a handgun more & more the walking stick, mono pod, shooting stick,with the large handgun just seems to go together. Alex

  18. #18

    Default depending on the situation and terrain for me

    If I'm sitting in position calling in predators or shooting varmints, I'll use shooting sticks or a bipod. If I'm hunting fairly open terrain or flat terrain with low vegetation, I'll usually lay across my backpack. When I was helping my wife with her moose hunt this past fall, we were hunting an old burn area and if you sat down you could see all of 10' in front of you. In that situation, I knew she'd have to shoot standing up. With her being pretty much a novice hunter, I cut a tall stick with a notch that I carried around. When she got ready to shoot her moose I handed her the stick to use as a monopod. It worked great. She was shaking enough when she was about to shoot that she told me afterwards she was happy to have that stick.

    To each his own I guess. I can see where they have utility in certain situations or for a certain style of hunting.

  19. #19

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    I have a harris bipod for my 338 that I have used once. The problem I had was that the tundra ground made for a very bad rest using the bipod. The legs just poked in to the ground. I find the pack to be a much better rest because it does not go down into the tundra. Might work in rocky soil areas, but for soft stuff it is extra weight to carry

  20. #20
    Member akshrop's Avatar
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    I have a mono. I have tried it out a few times hunting and the range. I really don't like it. It seems to slow, puts me in an uncomfortable position, and adds stress. Instead at the range I don't use the bench, unless zeroing a new rifle. I pratice mostly unsupported. I might be off base, but in my mind, the better I am unsupported, the better all the way around. I generally don't take long shots anyway.

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