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Thread: what bow to buy

  1. #1
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    Default what bow to buy

    looking to buy a new bow. I have been to see paul at the archery den and he has been very help full. being the I real know nothing about shooting or archery. so i have narrowed it down to three or for bows that i like to shoot , bowtec sniper,swat , diamond iceman and the mattews reeses. i know they will all do a good job killing animals. just maybe looking for any advice that mayhelp in leaning to one bow or another.
    Thanks for the help
    Cheers
    Richard

  2. #2
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    Default

    skipper,
    When I bought my bowtech guardian, I spent a lot of time in www.huntersfriend.com doing research, and read product reviews on the web. In my selection, I looked at it as an investment, and I thought low noise and low recoil was important. There was a lot of positive press out there on the Bowtech Guardian. There are many other good bows out there. One of the key factors on my decision was the binary cam system. Once I made up my mind, then I had to figure out how much this investment was going to cost me. In total, it was just shy of $1,200 to start shooting. I have no regrets about my investment. Once I was able to start shooting, that is when you really start learning.

  3. #3

    Default Try them all

    I am also brand spankin new to archery... Santa brought me a new PSE. There are so many stinkin options, to narrow it down is very difficult. You will hear from affectionados who own each brand and give you very good reasons to buy that brand. And then adding the accessories... WOW! There are so many things to choose from. And that is just a start... next getting the bow tuned and set up for you will take a bit of time but worth every minute. Be careful of the shop that will generically tune your bow... this is a very much individual process that takes a bit of time and shooting.

    Find the local archery club, join, and attend the shoots. See if there is someone who can help you choose, and then help you with setup and proper shooting form/technique. I am finding that while pulling the string back and letting it go is easy. To put the arrow in the same place consistently takes proper form and technique... even the slightest error can send the arrow off into left field.

    So, regarding your bow selection, stop by the shop and see if they have bows that you can try... see which one feels the best and reacts the least when shooting.

    Hope that helps, again, I am a total newbie, but these are things that have helped me so far.

    Cheers

  4. #4
    Member akjeff's Avatar
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    Default

    IMO... One of the most important things to consider is support, and forming a relationship with the local shop. The big box may or may not be able to give the quality support needed. Finding a trustworthy shop is important. If a good shop is unavailable, find a good club or local archer who is willing to help. My wife and I own a couple bows each. I ended up shooting one brand and my wife shoots two different brands. Both are big names, but I will not advocate one over the other. Our local shop and the shop/range we shoot at are great. Both shops sell a variety of bows. I would choose a bow based on how it shoots and the support I get from that shop, not the brand.

    Have you checked out that Limbsaver brand bow?

  5. #5

    Default

    Being the owner of a Mathews Switchback XT I would recommend this bow as a very good choice of bows. It is about the smoothest shooting bow around. It is not the fastest, but it is very quite and smooth. I shot the Reezen looking to see if it would be time to upgrade. The draw pull on the bow is a bit rough towards the final letoff. It also has a pretty good vibration in the rizer when you shoot. Depending on your desire to spend money I would take a hard look at the Mission series bows by Mathews. The mission is a switchback xt without the additional dampners in the rizers. For reference I have shot the bowtec bows and find them to also be top quality bow, but the draw curve is no where near as smooth as the Mathews bows. Perhaps this is why the Bowhunting Worlds Reader's choice award has the Mathew's Switchback XT as the bow of the year. That is a pretty big comment on this bow given that it is 3 years old. Just be sure to shoot the bows and compare the sound and smoothness. Don't fall for the advertising hype or speed alone. Quiet kills. And be sure to try them all. You will start to notice the subtle differences. For any modern bow I would look for something that has an IBO rating of at least 310fps. That will ensure that you can sling heavy hunting arrows at around 280fps. That will keep things reasonable in terms of the arch in archery. Also look at brace heights. A 7" brace height will shoot well for a beginner. Low brace height bows can be touchy to shoot. Finally make sure you check your draw length in every bow model. Not all 29" draws are the same. The reflex of the handles can have substantial impact on your shooting form. Paul will steer you right, but unfortunately he does not carry the Mathews or Hoyt brands that I really prefer.

  6. #6
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    Default Bow

    I shoot a hoyt but have had other brands and liked them to. My opinion also is to find a pro shop, not a box store that can help you set it up right and give you the help you need when you need it. Then practice, practice and practice some more! Have fun!

  7. #7
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    Default what strato fisher said X2

    I agree with what stratofisher said. Don't worry about speed, accuracy is what counts. Paul will steer you straight no question there. I have a speed bow, and it is a finiky little thing. WE get along when it's warm out, and I am very confident out to 70 yards, but when it's cold and you got all that bulky clothing on, and your stiff, next thing ya know a 65+" moose walks out at 80 yards......you wish you had that bow that was super accurate and forgiving. Been there done that. The moose won that one. Paul knows I am looking for another bow, just waiting to see what the 09s shape up to be. I like my bowtech don't get me wrong, I just need to shoot ALOT to keep my confidence up with this bow. Abuddy of mine can pick up his mathews after it being in the closet all winter and hit the 10 ring with ease. His bow has a much more forgiving brace height, but I am faster. Thats cool at the range, but if your a hunter like most of us here, accuracy is SSSOOO much more important.
    There is a mathews dealer in wassila, used to be called Fletchers, he moved his shop and is working out of his garage I think. Somebody correct me if I am wrong, is his new shop called Bear archery? Anyway, look up the old fletchers number, that still works. GREAT guy, just like Paul, he will take the time to get you set up right. Shoot all the bows you can get your hands on, you'll figure out what bow is for you.

  8. #8
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default

    Once you've picked through a lot of bows and found a few that fit the bill for you (which it sounds like you have), buy the one that feels right to you. I know that sounds a bit simplistic, but every shooter is different and every person has different preferences in how a bow feels in their hands. I bought a bow from Paul at the Den last year. I bet I was in there 20 times for an hour each before I finally made a decision. I shot every bow he had at least twice, and then eventually narrowed it down to the Kodiak Titan and the Bowtech Guardian. Yeah, I did research and asked people for their opinions, but at the end of the day it just came down to the bow that felt the best as I was shooting it. I came in three or four more times just to shoot those bows side by side. Five arrows, switch bows...one arrow, switch bows...etc. Once I did this a few times and kept feeling better with the Bowtech in my hands, that sealed the deal.

    Buy the bow that feels right to you. There is no "best bow", just the best one for you.

  9. #9
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    Talking Picking out a bow...

    Picking out a bow for someone would be tuff.I like to take a quiver full of arrows in early spring and rove...stump shoot.Pine cones,wild flowers,clumps of grass.I can do this with a recurve and a quiver full of cedar arrows.If I had a compound and a bunch of graphite shafts, it would get pretty expensive.I'm sure I couldn't enjoy a compound.We all have a preference.GR

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