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Thread: Things that go wrong in the field (gear)...

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Things that go wrong in the field (gear)...

    I was looking at my peep sight wondering how I'd function without it.

    On another website, one poster described some problems with damaged bow sight fibers when hiking through heavy brush.

    What kinds of gear problems have you had in the field?

  2. #2
    Member Fr. Joe's Avatar
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    I used to shoot feathers on my arrows, but after my last couple elk hunts in Idaho I switched to Duravanes. The feathers would get ripped to shreds going through all that insane brush.

    I also completely got rid of using a peep sight. I never liked them anyway, so I just trained myself to shoot without it. As long as I keep the same anchor point (like in traditional shooting) I've had no problems at all with accuracy.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Lots of things go wrong. This is one reason that I have found a bow, sight, release and rest that I am very confident in. I am not one to change my hunting bow every year. My rest, sight and release have all been used for the last five years. I have never lost a peep in the field. I have seen one guy lose one after he forgot to load an arrow in the heat of things and dry fired his bow. Tie the peep in properly and you are not going to lost it or have it move.

    Losing fibers is no big deal. You can either carry extras or just shoot without them. For years we shot with brass pins and no fibers. I have a little bag that slips over my sight and I haven't lost a fiber in years. I hunt with a Spot Hogg Hogg It and .019 fibers. It has never let me down and I doubt I will ever have another sight on my bow.

    I have had drop aways fail, so I just stick with something simple. In my case it's the endlessly controversial Whisker Bisquit. It works for me and that's all I care about.

    You should always carry two releases that are identical. I haven't lost a single release since I started carrying two I've never broken a release in the field so I have no recomendations on releases.

    I only shoot hunting bows that can be disassebled without a bow press. All Martin bows can do this, as well as several of the Bowtechs and a few other bows on the market. I carry a complete set of shot in cables and strings with me on any hunt that isn't from my house. I mark the peep sight location and make sure I have a spare peep in my kit. I take a small foam target with me to camp to check to make sure the bow is still on. 9 times out of 10 I am still dead on out to 30 yards.

    On remote hunts I always carry 12 arrows. You never know when you are going to fall and break one. You never know when you might have to waste a couple sighting the bow back in.

    Every serious bowhunter should understand how to tune a bow and how to disassemble it. Otherwise take two bows with you in the field if the hunt is expensive.

    Bowhunting is a ton of fun. There are a lot of gadgets involved and you have to anylize which ones are for you. I try to keep it as simple as possible, but I don't enjoy traditional enough to use it. Therefore I just take my compounds for what they are and prepare for the worst.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Lucky

    Lucky I guess. But proper planning usually solves the problem before it starts. I go over the bow completely before any major hunts. If it looks like it might fail it is fixed prior to the hunt. I have a small kit of replaceable parts and an Allen wrench that fits most screws. I carry three extra broadheads, a small game point but only six arrows. A good case to carry the bow in is a must on planes to protect the bow. Hard for the commercial flights and a soft for the bush pilots. One key thing is too have everything marked somehow with whiteout or a scratch so you can repair it as it was prior to the breakage.

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  5. #5

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    bout the only thing I can have go wrong is break a string...usually carry a couple or three spares.

    my first sheep hunt in 97 cut 5 strings..thankfully I was overpacked (ode to the memories of the gawd awful heavy pack) and had my server. Was on the last string, thankfully I didnt need to salvage the good strands from the cut strings lol.

    Only thing other then that is broken bow or broken arrows, neither of which is going to get fixed on a bush hunt.

    k
    i
    s
    s

    Have had a water filter failure on a walk in sheep hunt..thankfully had some tablets and enough water that I could hunt for a couple of days...going light ment not having enough fuel to burn to boil water every day for any length of time. Things worked out on that hunt too...all but taking the shot, nice full curl broomed ram 20 yards, got up to soon, had a rainjacket spotting scope in one hand and my bow in the other.....ugg. Beauuutiful sight I'll remember for years.

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    Wink Day pack..

    I've had a strap break on my day pack when I was a ways from camp, but since have double stitched every seam with Dental floss.Pack will rip befor the threads ever give way.GR

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    The only piece of equipment I've had break on a bowhunt that affected my potential for success was my brain. Twice I missed out on caribou due to gear being packed away. One night in camp four large bulls walked right into our tents while we were sitting by the fire. It took me about a minute to find my release, which was about 10 seconds too long. It never came off my wrist after that. On the drive home about 50 miles south of Coldfoot we had four of the biggest bull caribou that I have ever seen walk across the road and stare at us for a good 45 seconds. This time it was my entire bow that was packed away, as we figured we wouldn't see anything south of Atigun in August. Again, about 15 seconds too late I got my gear out and ready to go.

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    Default That is one of the laws of hunting

    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    The only piece of equipment I've had break on a bowhunt that affected my potential for success was my brain. Twice I missed out on caribou due to gear being packed away. One night in camp four large bulls walked right into our tents while we were sitting by the fire. It took me about a minute to find my release, which was about 10 seconds too long. It never came off my wrist after that. On the drive home about 50 miles south of Coldfoot we had four of the biggest bull caribou that I have ever seen walk across the road and stare at us for a good 45 seconds. This time it was my entire bow that was packed away, as we figured we wouldn't see anything south of Atigun in August. Again, about 15 seconds too late I got my gear out and ready to go.
    Dont you know that if you would have had things at the ready, you wouldn't have seen a thing... at least that is how it goes for me... I hope to find success up there this next year with my new bow!... I am looking forward to that.

    Cheers

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    Forum Sponsor PM Asman's Avatar
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    Not that I have been doing this awhile; more that I am tough on gear - I joke that I can almost build an entire new bow from the contents of my pack. I bring back-ups of about everything even though I try to build my rigs a bulletproof as possible. If my jet-boil goes down - I eat cold soup; If my tent pole snaps - I build a lean-to; if my raft leaks - I bail ... if my bow goes down - the hunt is over.
    Twice this past year I headed out with completely new set-ups; things I need to prove (to myself in the field prior to hanging them on the shelves). I attempt to consider every possible point of failure and figure out a work around prior to leaving the shop. This spring I am heading down to Kodiak for bear with another completely different set-up ... and I going with great confidence (and a couple of ideas).
    But this is an interesting consideration ...
    What are the absolute necessities? Hmmmmm. I guess it depends on the type of venture but at a minimum:
    -extra string / cable
    -allen wrench
    -a good plan
    -a good back-up plan
    -a heathly imagination

    Oh, I love this stuff ... building the "bow first aid kit" ... I' m thinking ...

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Paul - If I bring my bow tomorrow when we come to pick up Sara's bow, can you show me quickly how to change my string in the field? I know the Guardian can be changed without a bow press. I don't need a change yet, but I'd like to know what I'm doing.

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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Good maintenance ahead of hunts will solve a lot of problems I've heard from some folks. One thing I've done though is I only shoot with my fingers. I never quite got the feel of a release although I do think they are a little more accurate than finger shooting if you learn to use them. But I've heard many stories like Brian's above where the release isn't tied in to one's hand, or worse, it breaks/malfunctions/etc., and then the person can't shoot. I've always figured it was one unneccesary step that I could eliminate, and I've gotten to be pretty darn accurate out to about 45 yards or so without it.

    I do always practice with a leather finger glove and make every effort to have it on me at all times in the field. But, I also take a number of shots on occasion without it - hurts a bit - just in case that situation comes up in the field where I don't have it. That way, as long as my bow/arrows are good to go, I'm ready.
    Never count your days, but rather, make all of your days count.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmg View Post
    I've always figured it was one unneccesary step that I could eliminate, and I've gotten to be pretty darn accurate out to about 45 yards or so without it.
    I hear you've also eliminated that unnecessary step of finding a moose as well. That sure must cut down on the equipment issues.

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    I had my fiber optic site on my 30 yard pin pulled out while going thru some heavy brush, so now I also carry super glue for a quick fix along with bow string as the wax comes off quit fast also while trudging thru the thick stuff.Also had thing loosen up on me so now I make sure I carry along all allen keys that go with what Im using, so I can keep those things in check.
    Been a few other things also, but those come to mind off the top of my head.

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    Member J.J.'s Avatar
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    I have had the surgical tubing on my peep sight break while drawing back on 6 point bull elk, That missed opertunity was painfull. I also had a release malfunction while hunting mulies on the late hunt one year - I was unable to draw on a nice 4 point buck. I carry more gear now because of those incidents. An extra release is nice to bring - maybe not in your day pack, but knowing that an "back-up" release or some other part etc. is at camp is comforting.

    JJ

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    Member B-radford's Avatar
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    I recently broke the plastic launcher on my Ripcord arrow rest. I contacted Ripcord and they are sending me some new ones free of charge. So in my opinion, any thing plastic need to have a spare in you hunting equipment first aid kit. Luckly i broke it shooting in my back yard at -10 and not out in the field hunting.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Very informative thread.

    Thanks for the great advice. I'm sure there'll be others.
    Quite a few potential showstoppers in these posts.
    Valuable to hear good tips from those experienced in the field to minimize the risk of a gear malfunction that could end a hunt.
    Much appreciated.

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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    I hear you've also eliminated that unnecessary step of finding a moose as well. That sure must cut down on the equipment issues.

    Ha ha ha...funny.


    (touche)
    Never count your days, but rather, make all of your days count.

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmg View Post
    Ha ha ha...funny.


    (touche)
    Sheesh, no wonder you don't find those moose. I made that comment two days ago! I wonder how many legal bulls have walked right by while you're checking your blackberry for the latest issue of the Harvard Law Review.

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    Member jmg's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Sheesh, no wonder you don't find those moose. I made that comment two days ago! I wonder how many legal bulls have walked right by while you're checking your blackberry for the latest issue of the Harvard Law Review.
    Some of us do have to work for a living you know. But you do make a good point. No wonder I can't find bulls in the field when I obviously missed the bull s*&t sitting right here for two whole days.
    Never count your days, but rather, make all of your days count.

  20. #20
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    The only piece of equipment I've had break on a bowhunt that affected my potential for success was my brain. Twice I missed out on caribou due to gear being packed away. One night in camp four large bulls walked right into our tents while we were sitting by the fire. It took me about a minute to find my release, which was about 10 seconds too long. It never came off my wrist after that. On the drive home about 50 miles south of Coldfoot we had four of the biggest bull caribou that I have ever seen walk across the road and stare at us for a good 45 seconds. This time it was my entire bow that was packed away, as we figured we wouldn't see anything south of Atigun in August. Again, about 15 seconds too late I got my gear out and ready to go.
    You never shoot off your hands? Might have been worth it, doesn't hurt that much...
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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