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Thread: If you had to choose a river to hunt?

  1. #1
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    Default If you had to choose a river to hunt?

    Alright guys i know this is going to be a vague question, but here it goes. I own a 95 hewescraft 21 ft inboard jet boat and i was wondering what rivers that boat is suitable to take up for moose, bear (brown or black) or caribou. I just can't seem to find any rivers that a boat that big would go up easily other than the yukon. I haven't hunted up north at all, so i am very un-familiar with those rivers, but even the big Su seems a bit hairy in a bigger boat if you don't know the channels very well. Hopefully someone has .02 cents to throw in, so i can start to plan this years outings a little better.

    P.S. I am always looking for good hunting partners that are more knowledgable about the areas.. Spring black season in PWS is getting closer...lol

    Thanks,

    david

  2. #2
    Member akriverrat's Avatar
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    Default

    the big su is the big inboard jetboat river around here. if you cant get used to that then you had better get a smaller boat that you are more comfortable with. there is moose hunting on the tanana you could go downstream on the little su, run across the inlet and up beluga river. yetna river is very runable. talkeetna, nenana, lake louise, klutina river, there are lots of options out there but trying to tie in moosehunting with prime river running and fishing and so on could be like lining up the planets. gotta start somewhere pick one, do your homework and go out and have fun.

  3. #3
    Member akshrop's Avatar
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    Nothing wrong with the Yukon, unless it is just too far for you to get to. I really have enjoyed every minute on it and it has great hunting and fish opportunities.

  4. #4
    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    Default Run the Su

    The Big Su is your best bet. It leads to other runnable rivers. Hauling enough fuel is a limiting factor.
    The channels change every spring, so the important thing is to learn to read the water. After the first season of getting yourself unstuck, you'll know what you are doing.
    That's how we learned.
    The Talkeetna also leads to some good country and rivers.
    On all these rivers I recommend carrying an anchor. It might keep you out from under a sweeper. Jam the jet unit or run out of fuel and you drift a long ways....
    Live life and love it
    Love life and live it

  5. #5

    Default Rivers to run

    If you are relatively new to this boat, I believe that you will find that you will become much more comfortable running smaller water as you gain experience. As mentioned, it really comes down to your skill level in reading water AND the experience you will gain on particular sections of water. I run some relatively small clear water in my 22' inboard but they are rivers that I know fairly well. There's also sections of the Tanana that, over time, I have gained some knowledge/confidence on. However, I am always cautious when running any water for the first time. I always like to run upriver first when exploring new water. Make sure that you have adequate tools with you to get unstuck and don't go alone (always bring a good shovel). Do not explore side channels of braided rivers like the Tanana when going downstream.
    I started out running a small green boat before I bought this one. There are some places that I have no plans of taking it, but I am willing to try running a lot of different water as long as I have some "outs" or back up plans.
    Don't keep a boat that you are not going to use.

  6. #6
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    Default Canoe, Yukon

    Your boat with a canoe would open up tons of sloughs, back eddys, oxbows. Light enough to drag a few hundred yards through the trees and into a back slough. Have seen that type of Hewes on the Yukon plenty of times. I think you can run skinnier rivers, but the Yukon is darn good for hunting and fishing.

  7. #7
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    Default Location?

    MD where are you located? We had a 21' riverrunner for years that we took everywhere. Ran skinnys up salcha, hunted near Koyakuk, and did quite a bit of Halibut fishing out of Valdez with it. Its a verry capable boat once you get familiar with it. A nice thing about it is its pretty light so it's not too bad to drag off bars!

  8. #8
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    Benwa,
    I live in Palmer but i am willing to travel north or wherever i can get the most out of the boat. I have only been in Alaska for two years and only had the boat one, so i am a newby at running these rivers. I ahve taken it out of whittier and seward before, but not up any rivers yet. I bought it late in the year and was more interested in getting a few butts since i killed a moose early this year. I am possibly looking at using it ALOT next year and don't want to end up through the windshield b/c i slammed a sand bar...lol... I am decent at reading channels and have ran some of the rivers when i had my lil 16 ft flatbottom, but this is a whole different type of machine now. I just need to go run them when the water is up a little in the srping and get used to them all i guess. I am looking at adding a zodiak to it for chasing spring blacks and what not though, so that should help me out some. Thanks to everyone for the input they have given it all helps!!

    David

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