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Thread: wood weight

  1. #1

    Default wood weight

    Next fri. I will start hauling up river. Looked up some weights. Lumber (@ 35 pounds per cubic foot, Douglas Fir)4
    2X4 1.28 pounds per foot
    2X6 2.00 pounds per foot
    2X8 2.64 pounds per foot
    2X10 3.37 pounds per foot
    2X12 4.10 pounds per foot
    4X4 2.98 pounds per foot
    6X6 7.35 pounds per foot
    6X8 10.03 pounds per foot
    One 23/32" 4'x 8' plywood piece would weigh approximately 67 lbs.
    One 23/32" 4'x 8' OSB piece would weigh approximately 78 lbs.

    Plywood is approximately 15% to 19% lighter than OSB. While the additional weight of OSB does not mean increased strength, it just means that it is heavier to handle on the job. In addition, OSB's higher weight means higher thermal conductivity (thus slightly less R value) than plywood.

    Looks like plywood is the way to go.

  2. #2
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Those are pretty good numbers. Depending on where you buy your lumber the wood is very likely to be spruce which is a little lighter. I use 1.8 lbs per board foot for SPF (spruce pine fir) and I always get very close for helicopter loads. I use 2.5 lbs per board foot on treated lumber and that also works very well. Would can vary by as much as 10% in either direction.

    The OSB I sell, LP Topnotch, 23/32 TNG runs right at 70lbs per each when I have actually put them on a scale. 3/4 TNG plywood usually runs right at 64#.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Just be aware that the studs you get at the lumber yards can be incredibly wet and heavy wood. I've been amazed how heavy some of the 2X4's are in the racks at the box stores. If you won't be hand selecting the wood you might be in for a rude suprise at weights, or will need to allow some time for the wood to dry before shipping it in.

  4. #4
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    This time of year, with low moisture levels, the wood is going to be as light as it gets. Especially if they've kept it inside for long. Most of the wood that Depot and Lowes sells is HemFir..which is roughly the same weight as DougFir and heavier than spruce. If you get a fresh load from the States it definately can be heavier.

    In Alaska, SPF lumber is what you will find in 2x4 through 2x8 at SBS in Wasilla, Big Lake and Palmer...and my store in Talkeetna. We all use DougFir or HemFir in 2x10 and 2x12. Depot and Lowes run with HemFir.

    In the Anchorage area HemFir seems to dominate in SBS's stock and Uresco's stock, as well as at Depot and Lowes.

    HemFir dominates the treated lumber products in everyone's stores.

    While SPF (spruce) is not as strong, it's compression strength for plates and studs is more than anough. As long as you use the correct span tables it is fine for floor joists and rafters as well. Where it excels is cold weather construction. It is FAR easier to nail spruce in cold weather than DougFir or HemFir. My customers far prefer SPF and so that is what I stock. You will also find far less cracks in SPF.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  5. #5
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    Tony
    where you hauling the wood to.
    I am also going to haul out some lumber to the lake creek area i have about 12,000 lbs to haul not counting on another 3 or 4,000 in fuel and other stuff....... Its going to take awhile..LOL

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    Man I don't miss hauling just to haul. I am glad those days are behind me. Good luck and stay safe.

  7. #7

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    Just weighed some pressure treated 2x6x10 came up with 22 lbs ea.

  8. #8
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Sounds about right. Most pressure treat this time of the year has been around for a little while. I have had it weigh as much as 3 lbs/BF in the summer right from the barge, to 2.0/BF in the winter months after it has dried a bit.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  9. #9

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    This is why i need to buy all the treated lumber now!

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