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Thread: Rod Selection

  1. #1

    Default Rod Selection

    Sept. 09 going to fish bows on the Clear Creek North of Wasilla and then on the Kenia. Our trip will end on Kodiak with silvers. NEED some NEW GEAR I have budgeted for 2 new rods, would love some recomendations on line weight and rod length for those areas. Will be wading and fishing out of driftboat. Thanks

  2. #2
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ldh1187 View Post
    Sept. 09 going to fish bows on the Clear Creek North of Wasilla and then on the Kenia. Our trip will end on Kodiak with silvers. NEED some NEW GEAR I have budgeted for 2 new rods, would love some recomendations on line weight and rod length for those areas. Will be wading and fishing out of driftboat. Thanks

    Check out this thread. The options and opinions are a many as there are members here
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  3. #3
    Member Xanfly's Avatar
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    You mean this thread Chuck?

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=42404

    Or Maybe This thread?

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=43516

    or this one?

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=44714


    Have to be more specific than that Chuck.


    ldh1187

    You should be able to get all the info you need from these threads.


    You pretty much need a 5wt or 6wt and an 8wt. The flavors are endless.

  4. #4
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    opppps i copied it but forgot to paste it thanks fly


    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=43516

    there is the one i was thinking
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  5. #5
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Many ways to skin a cat. As Chuck mentioned, you will get lots of opinions. There is no right or wrong way to do things (within reason). You have lots of options here. I have two.


    One,
    Get a 5 or 6 wt for the streams and a 8 wt for the silvers.

    Two,
    Forget the two rod approach and get one very nice 7 wt with an extra tip section. This would be my choice, especially if you can get a high end rod in doing so, compared to two lower end rods with the 5/6 and 8 wt set up. It would suck to take a trip to Alaska and break a rod on day 2 of 10. I am a big fan of extra rods or at least an extra tip section. You don't need it until you do.


    I would give some thought to how you will use the rods. Not just this one trip to Alaska, but after the fact. Would you make good use of a 5 and an 8 wt back home. Or a 6 and an 8. Or would the 7 wt get any use on your home waters. This would be something to consider since truth is, any combination of the above will meet your needs in Alaska. Try to spend your money on a set up you can use beyond this one trip.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  6. #6
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    5 and 8 is all you need

    or a 4 and 7
    or a 5 and 7
    Maybe a 3 and an 8

    You want a light and a heavy, 3-6 and 7-10 I'd get one you could use where you live
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  7. #7
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default ahhh

    5.5 ft fiberglass with zebco 202....

    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  8. #8
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskacanoe View Post
    5.5 ft fiberglass with zebco 202....
    They still make those
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  9. #9
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default That was

    my rod choice in 1960.

    Originally Posted by Alaskacanoe
    5.5 ft fiberglass with zebco 202....
    They still make those
    __________________

    If I could find a properly functioning Time machine ( My neighbor Daltons, time machine and space ship are not dependable at this time).. I would go back to 1960 and do it all over again....
    and I am not sure if they still make the 202...lol
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  10. #10
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Perhaps time for a new rod and reel there man


    Here is one for $12!

    http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/st...:referralID=NA
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  11. #11
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    That is a classic rod and reel. I remember my dad having them and taking me fishing with them. The fact you can get them still is even more amazing
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  12. #12
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default fly rods

    the reason i posted about that little outfit, was because that was,, how we fly fished..
    If you noitice, there is clear plastic bubble on that setup, it has about 1/2 filled with water, so it floats and yet gives some weight to cast.
    We would put 5 feet of light line on behind that , and tie on a fly..
    My dads favorite, was a "double renegade"..
    We would cast out and then slowly jig retrieve in,, let it sit until the fly started to sink,, then reel and jig,, and do that all the way in..
    It was a form of fly fishing... .... I suppose...
    It worked as you can see..
    Max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  13. #13

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    Thanks for all the info. I'll add the 202 to the list

  14. #14
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    I want one just to put in the boat so when people come by to chat on the river Ill tell them. thats my secret weapon
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  15. #15
    Member garnede's Avatar
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    I used one of those 202's to catch pinks my firs year here. That was a blast. I got some funny looks but a 202 on a 5'6" rod makes a 3-4 pound pink a heck of a fight.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

  16. #16

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    202 definetly going in the bag for a little fun. Based on what you all shared it appears my 5wt will be fine, 7wt can goes as back up and have narrowed my selection to a new 10' 8wt for silvers. Any of you fish Orvis rods?

  17. #17
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ldh1187 View Post

    narrowed my selection to a new 10' 8wt for silvers.

    Any of you fish Orvis rods?
    Be sure to cast the 10 footer first. You might like it, you might hate it. Big difference compared to 9 footers. More than it would seem like.


    For Orvis rods, never used one. I would shop around carefully. Lots to choose from and you might find more rod for your money elsewhere. I have noticed lots of good deals online lately. Something to consider perhaps. For the most part, Orvis is sold directly from their website so not many deals out there. Alternatively, just about every other rod maker has some good deals to be found online. Yet another indication that the economy is in the tank
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  18. #18

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    Thanks for the heads up. Have only fished a 10 footer out of a drift boat, fishing beads, simply duckand chuck

  19. #19
    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    I use a GLoomis GLX 5wt 10ft 2-piece rod for rainbow, dolly and grayling fishing, took some time for me to get used to the extra length especially after using 9ft flyrods for years. After talking with some guides on the river I switched my 5wt flyline over to a 6wt, rod loads up better. Guess most of the guides I know all use 6wt flyline on their 5wt rods. The other 5wt I have is a Lamiglass G1000 series 9ft 2-piece. This is the 5wt I am used too, I especially like using it when I drift fish out of the boat with my buddy on the oars, works great when we are fishing the banks, 10ft seems to be a little long for this kind of fishing. 10ft works great when I am fishing off the gravel bars or wading and fishng the banks.
    For salmon fishing in general I use a 8wt, pretty much standard for salmon, except for kings. For them I use a 10wt flyrod.
    For brands, I have used Gloomis, Sage, Loop, Lamiglass, Orvis, Cabelas, and now I am gonna try a new Temple Fork Outfitters Lefty Kreh 7wt 9footer. This is the rod I will use for sockeye fishing. IMO the 7wt is the best selection for sockeye since most average 6-7lbs. 8wt is great for Chum and Coho. I have a 9wt that I occassionally use for Coho since some of the males can be up to and over 12+ lbs. Most of these rods are 9ft, one of my Sage rods is 9.5 ft, this was my first Sage. Good luck in finding the right combination of rods for your style and type of fishing.

  20. #20
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post

    After talking with some guides on the river I switched my 5wt flyline over to a 6wt, rod loads up better. Guess most of the guides I know all use 6wt flyline on their 5wt rods.
    I agree with what was said here, just don't want to confuse the OP. Overlining is common practice when fishing out of a boat. Less false cast are needed as the rod loads faster with less line. But the reason you can get away with this is that when fishing from a boat you don't usually need much casting distance. But you may need to get out a quick cast. Particularly if sight fishing. This is common in saltwater fly fishing as well.

    But if you are doing most of your fishing from the banks (as most people do) get the right size line for the rod. Some will overline their rods anyway since all these new super fast action rods are the in thing. If you need to overline a rod due to the action being too fast, you bought the wrong rod for your skill level.

    Alternatively, something you never hear about is underlining. This is what you would do if you really wanted to cast further. Takes more length of line to obtain the same weight being aerialized, in turn loading the rod.

    Then some people say that overlining a rod makes it cast better in the wind. This is misleading as well. Tight loops are where distance comes from when casting into the wind. When overlining a rod, you are causing the rod to bend deeper in the blank than it should. End result will be greater distance from the top to the bottom of your loop. Alternatively, underlining by one will maintain tight loops as more of the loading is in the tip section, causing a shorter arc in the loop.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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