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Thread: Homer Halibut Tides

  1. #1
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    Default Homer Halibut Tides

    Just thought I'd ask for some feed back on what would be ideal tides for Cook Inlet Halibut. I fished it for two years out of Homer and basically try to fish on the front or back sides of any tide. Ideally I like to fish smaller tides so I can fish longer. I have the benifit to time my trips any time in July or August. My fishing is split between going North toward Anchor Point or South between Flat Island and Elizabeth. What would you experienced Halibut fisherman look for in tides if you had the choice. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    I look for the least amount of water movement. As you stated, ripping tides cut down alot of fishing time. Even then a ripping tide still makes it tough to chase buty all but for a few hours unless you have the anchor on your line to keep your bait on the bottom. We all love reeling up 250 feet of line to make sure our herring is still there in a ripping tide and 4 lbs of lead hanging out there
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    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    I do not like lots of current and I don't like 0 current. You need some, it spreads the scent farther and the fish are generally more active. Too much current you can't stay on the bottom. No current, the fish don't move much and don't seem to bite as good.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Even on days with the smallest tide changes, there is still plenty of tidal movement!

    I've fished on days with some of the highest tide swings and the fishing was hot once we got on a bite. During the rip even a 5# sinker wouldn't get down, so there is some time you won't be fishing. But if the timing of the rips is right, you'll be headed in or out during the rip, or moving between spots.

    I'll take calm water with bigger tide swings to rough water and minimal swings.

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the replys. I would also be interested on how long you sit in one spot before moving. Sometimes you get to your waypoint with good timing on the tide and the rods are going down in a couple minutes. Other times you can sit there for fourty five minutes with good scent out and nothing. I tend to get impatient and move two to five miles to find fish. I keep doing this until I find a bit(I usually fish 30-45 minutes before moving). Am I moving to soon or is prospecting the way to go?

  6. #6
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
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    Default Be patient!

    I tend to be on the patient side. The only thing moving does is increase your chance of dropping your bait on a big fish. This last year, we had a MONSTER tide. We fished before it started moving and got some small fish and when the tide started roaring we just stuck it out. We left our rigs out until the tide slowed and when it did we were back onto fish and I got into a 85# halibut right off the bat. If your catching fish be patient, if your not, you might consider moving. Patience is generally the key.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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