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Thread: Black Bear Trip/Fishing...POW or KUIU

  1. #1
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    Default Black Bear Trip/Fishing...POW or KUIU

    Hello to all. Been watching a while now, but first time poster. In the process of researching a hunt to alaska. IF black bear where my primary objective, what is better: Fall hunt or Spring? Don't mind a lot of walking, but don't want to have elbow to elbow hunting either. Second, what fishing is available for either trip_ spring/fall? Thanks for any responses.

    PS. How much snow is up there right now on POW?

  2. #2
    Member Bearclaw67's Avatar
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    Not a lot of snow most places with the exception of maybe valdez area.
    Paul

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    Default Elbow room

    Focus your efforts on a designated wilderness area and you'll get plenty of room to roam.

    Get there in the Spring and plan on holding out for a great hide. Fishing.......Saltwater mainly but some locations have Steel.

    You'll experience a whole new level of solitude.

  4. #4

    Default POW Black Bears

    Spring hunting traditionally yields larger bears and a much higher percentage of males. Fishing will be mostly the saltwater variety. Stream fishing for salmon will be better in the fall. Keep in mind that GMU's 2 & 3 will be closed to the use of motorized land vehicles for hunting black bears in September beginning this year.

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    Have hunted POW both Spring and Fall. Different opportunities for both periods.

    Spring hunts are primarily off the beaches. This can be done off the road, but not very efficiently. You really need to take a skiff or rent one to have a quality hunt. Steelhead fishing in the middle of May on the Island is amazing.

    Fall hunts can be done on the many salmon streams or in the hills where they feed on berries. The stream salmon fishing the first week of September is also spectacular(that was the week I was there). Another plus for the Fall is the opportunity for Sitka Blacktail deer. Out of four bear hunters we harvested three deer.

    On both hunts we saw plenty of bears. If I went back again and had a choice I would go back in the Fall because of the variety of activities. If my primary purpose was to harvest a huge black bear I would rent a skiff and hunt in the Spring.

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    Default try this

    Try Mike at Coffman Cove Adventures. He does do it yourself hunts, which includes the use of a boat.

    If it were me I would go in the spring for a blackie with a nice hide.

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    Default Thanks for all who repsonded

    Thanks for the input. There is a lot to read, but also a lot to learn. All comments/suggestions are greatly appreciated.

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    I would reccomend spring, May is usually best, and the Dolly Varden fishing can be fantastic. The king Salmon are also returning then, and you can not catch a finer fish. Also, the Dungeoness crab are shallow and easy, as well as succulent!
    You will need to rent a boat or skiff to really maximize your adventure, as well as your success, but this would, after all, be just that.
    Rentals are reasonable, and there are numerous Forest Service cabins for rent in good bear country.

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by buckmark View Post
    Try Mike at Coffman Cove Adventures. He does do it yourself hunts, which includes the use of a boat.

    I contacted Mike the other day myself. Looking for a change of scenery and fly fishing. I got an email from him with lots of info. If you pm me with your email address, I will forward it to you. From what I read, it sounds awesome. Access to a car, skiff, canoe, and boat for the week. Tons of fishing opportunities for sure. If interested, shoot me a pm and I will forward you what I have. Sounds like a sweet set up to me.


    Thanks to Buckmark for suggesting Mike in the fishing thread the other day
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by alaska viking View Post
    I would reccomend spring, May is usually best, and the Dolly Varden fishing can be fantastic. The king Salmon are also returning then, and you can not catch a finer fish. Also, the Dungeoness crab are shallow and easy, as well as succulent!
    You will need to rent a boat or skiff to really maximize your adventure, as well as your success, but this would, after all, be just that.
    Rentals are reasonable, and there are numerous Forest Service cabins for rent in good bear country.
    My wife and I are planning a similar trip for this spring, and we've read that May is the best. The problem is that our schedule dictates that we go in June. Is early / mid-June too late to try our luck at bears?

    Also, I've been having trouble narrowing down the area we want to stay. Reading information online, you would think that the entire island is crawling with bruins, but I'm sure there are good spots and bad ones. Any suggestions on general areas?

    This is our only chance to get out and have a true vacation since the next four years are pretty much tied up with graduate study and student loans.

    Any information would be appreciated.

    RW

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    I have killed many bears in June. It depends a great deal on the winter we have. This year, at least here in Juneau, we broke the record for snowfall in January, with over 120".
    I anticipate it being around awhile, and thus could delay green-up. Also, later in the season, I tend to hunt North facing drainages that see the sun later in the season.
    You will need to look your bears over for rubs, but that should be done as a matter of course, anyway.
    good luck!

  12. #12
    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Default the June hunt

    One thing about June is you do not have to salvage meat. But there will be plenty of rubbed Bear in the mix. Some of those late emergers will have very good hair.

    But remeber as green up moves upland the Bear do to. By June, during normal weather years, many Bear have left the beach.

    As for predicting this springs weather .... I think it will more like normal here in Southern SE. The last 2 years we have had very late deep snow springs. I just don't see that happening 3 years in a row.

    But it's a little early to tell.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by muskeg View Post
    One thing about June is you do not have to salvage meat. But there will be plenty of rubbed Bear in the mix. Some of those late emergers will have very good hair.

    But remeber as green up moves upland the Bear do to. By June, during normal weather years, many Bear have left the beach.

    As for predicting this springs weather .... I think it will more like normal here in Southern SE. The last 2 years we have had very late deep snow springs. I just don't see that happening 3 years in a row.

    But it's a little early to tell.
    We're going to salvage the meat no matter what - just makes a little stronger sausage, haha.

    As for the bears moving up, if spring hits on its normal schedule, do you see "road hunting" as a productive means? I've heard that people hunt both ways - from the skiffs and from the roads.

    When folks use the road system, do they usually find clearcuts to glass, or are the literally driving around hoping to spot a bear as they pass by? What I'm asking, I guess, is do people usually spend a lot of time on one cut or do they move pretty quickly from cut to cut?

    Thanks again for the help, guys!

    RW

  14. #14
    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Default rain forest jungle

    Even some spring Bear are not even considered edible. I guess it depends on how long they were on the Berries before going into den. Big Boars can be 'bad'.

    In this jungle you have to hunt where you have visibility. The Bears are always scattered from high Dens to Sealevel. Early in the spring season the vegetation and leaves are thin making upland hunting easier. But by June the vegetation usually has closed much of the visibility. Hunters use to hunt clear cuts more than now-a-days ... but now many of those are too overgrown to have any decent visibility. Very little recent logging = not many good visibility clear cuts. But there are a few. Road hunting, the way it was, is becoming more difficult.

    June does offer beach hunting .... just not as good as it usually is in April / May.

    Whether hunting the beaches or the uplands the successful hunters (besides the lucky ones) LIVE in their binos. Find vantage points and glass, glass, glass.

    That's when spotting scopes come in. To evaluate the bear at a distance. So you don't waste your time on one your not going to take when you get a closer look.

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