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Thread: Halibut Rods

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    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    Default Halibut Rods

    Has anyone out there used the G Loomis HLBR72-50RC Halibut fishing rods? I now have 4 Lamaglas BE 5610 RC rods with Penn 330 GT reels and I was wondering if I would even notice the difference between an $100.00 Lamaglas and the $325.00 G Loomis? I bought four G Loomis G3 trolling /jigging rods last spring and just love them.

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    Member Sierra Hotel's Avatar
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    Default Both

    I use the GL2 Loomis trolling rods for Kings, and the Lamiglas halibut rods, and I love them both. I don't know that I'd enjoy the Loomis 'but rods any more than I do the Lamiglas rods, and with the price delta, I'd prolly like the Lamiglas rods more!

    Two year's heavy use on the 'but rods and no problems yet . . . I also have two Penn stand-up rods that are outstanding.

    Cheers,
    SH

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I can't imagine you'll see much difference in a higher priced pool que rod. But if you want to spend some $ to upgrade, consider some avet two speed reels, you'll definatley appreciate them over the penns.

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    Member MRFISH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I can't imagine you'll see much difference in a higher priced pool que rod. But if you want to spend some $ to upgrade, consider some avet two speed reels, you'll definatley appreciate them over the penns.
    I'd second that recommendation about the Avet's. I absolutely love mine...

  5. #5

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    I am building a loomis halibut rod right now but it is a 966 back trolling rod blank. Have talked to guys that have done it before and they love them...

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    Default I have them

    Quote Originally Posted by ocnfish View Post
    Has anyone out there used the G Loomis HLBR72-50RC Halibut fishing rods? I now have 4 Lamaglas BE 5610 RC rods with Penn 330 GT reels and I was wondering if I would even notice the difference between an $100.00 Lamaglas and the $325.00 G Loomis? I bought four G Loomis G3 trolling /jigging rods last spring and just love them.
    to answer your question I have 17 HLBR72-50RC rods and they have proven to be very good halibut rods. What is the difference between the 100 dollar rod and the 325 dollar rod? The Loomis rod is about 8 ounces lighter, the components are better and it has a lifetime warrenty, so if in your lifetime it breaks in any way, they will replace it.
    I have Accurate 665NNS reels on them and that combination is great for a charter.
    Nothing wrong with the Lamiglass or an Ugly Stick for that matter. All of them will catch a halibut. Just depends on how you roll. A Ford Escort will get you the same place a Cadilac will. just might not be as nice a ride.

    For private use I would suggest a 6'6" G.Loomis Bucara rod with a Avet LX or JX ( less expensive) or Accurate 270 N( more expensive) loaded with 50 - 65 pound braided line and an 80 pound monofiliment top shot. For a private boat, it is all you need. When you catch a 30 pounder your rod will bend and they will pull line off the reel. If you catch a 200 pounder, you will never forget the fight in that fish on this kind of tackle. the set up does not look like much but it has all the power you need for any halibut or salmon in Alaska. Between my boats and my friends charters we have caught hundered of huge halibut on this tackle and never broke a Bucara.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    That's pretty much the configuration I run, 6'-6" seeker blue lighting with a shimano tld-20 2 speed and 300yds of 50# power pro, dacron backer and 80# mono leader. Well, until the first rig is lost and I put a corkscrew swivel on the end of the 50# braid and get back in action.

    It is so much more enjoyable to fish with the lighter tackle, especially jigging.

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    I agree with the desire for comfort and to that end have overhauled my "heavy tackle" this year. Considering 99% of our fish are 50lbs or less and we prefer to jig for them, I went with the Shimano Trevala F rods in the 50 lb rating. (the lightest one of this series) Paired with smaller Avets (MX) and 80lb braid we have a user friendly rig that's more than capable. I realize 80 lb braid is overkill on the set up but it's right at the place where you can handle it without gloves. The smaller stuff cuts me too much!
    These rods run $200 ea and have a counter to counter lifetime warranty.
    Food for thought! Mike

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    For bottom fishing halibut I use a Shimano Trevala XXH (heaviest in this line) with a Shimano TLD 30 2 speed reel and #130 Spectra. Not shockingly expensive (I think the TLD series is the hands down "bang for the buck" winner in fishing reels), great performance (low gear 1:1.2!) and really light and well balanced. The rod has great action and plenty of backbone (rated to #200).
    Matt Drayton, Chef de Cuisine
    Captain Steve's Fishing Lodge
    www.captainstevesfishinglodge.com

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    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    Default Thanks guy's

    This is all good info, I run an Osprey 26LC our of Seward and in the last three years have had many epic halibut encounters. When we run east to Montague it is a rare trip when we do not hook up on a 100+ lb fish and have connected to fish twice to three times that size. I cannot see going with less than 80# test. What I do not like about the Lamaglass rods is that often the thin braded line will get in between the roller and the guide and bind. Another thing is the butt cap is always coming off in the rod holders. I have had some of these the rods for 4 years and they are starting to show signs of wear and tear.

    By the way, I keep the 40 to 100 lb fish for reasons of tablefare. We release all the big females, but it is a rush to at least get them up to the boat for a couple of quick pictures and then get the hook out and then they are on their way.

    I think the next upgrade might be the reels this year and new rods next year.

    A correction to the original post is that the trolling jigging rods are G Loomis GL2's and they are great rods, if you have more than one you have to mark them so that you can get the correct parts together, they are built individually and will seat differently ... the price of quality.


    Thanks again .... spring is just around the corner

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    Wanted to follow up on the original post and see if anyone has experience with the G Loomis Halibut rod. Looks like since this thread started the rod might have undergone some changes (and a price increase) and is now model number HLBR 72-50 C. I have a Loomis rod from their Pro Blue series that I love and I wanted to see what experience people had with the Loomis halibut rod. I'm looking to use this rod as a dedicated halibut rod that can handle some big rock fish and lings as well. How is the performance of the roller guides with braided line? I appreciate your thoughts.

  12. #12

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    I'm not sure there's even one in the local fleet, either on charter boats or personal craft. And roller guides have fallen off the map with braid lines. That's because the Okuma Cedros Speed Jig rod is so popular. They're very lightweight, yet rated for 150# line. Great fun with rockfish and ling, yet capable as heck with large hali's. I doubt anyone around here uses weights heavier than 32 oz or fishes deeper than 300', and 16 oz/150' is more common, so that may be a factor in the lack of rollers. Best of all the Okuma is under $150.

  13. #13
    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    I bought two of the G Loomis halibut rods with the Shimanno reels. They are great! They are lighter and easier to use all day. I saw the Okuma Cedros Speed Jig rod at the sportrsman show it looks very capable. Still have the best last two Lamiglass rods and will replace them next year. I could not find any shop in Anchorage or the valley that had the HLBR 72-50 C in stock, if I buy it is over the internet and the standard price is $350.00 each.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    The only update is I no longer run conventional halibut rods, I only use jigging rods. I still have the seeker blue lightnings but ditched the 2 sp tld's as they are too heavy, and am running tld 15 single speeds with upgraded drags. I also have a pair of shimano trevalas with avet reels. As I've expounded on other threads, when you make the switch to jigging you use a lighter rod which you can comfortably fish all day, and you measure your jigs in ounces, vs. pounds for sinkers. With the lighter jigs you don't need a low speed reel as you aren't winching up a heavy weight.

    Maybe I have adhd, but I just can't sit back and wait for bait to soak, also jigging seems to be more effective.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Member fishingyoda's Avatar
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    I just got into the sport and I bought an ugly stick with a pen SQL 30 I believe. I love the set up. Light weight for jigging, the only problem I have is watching my buddy pull up fish with his 2 speed avets. Much smoother reel.

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    +1 on Gloomis paired with Shimano.

    My favorite halibut rod is my Gloomis 6'6" 40-60, Shimano Tekota 700 with Carbonx drags spooled with 60# jb green. I've used the same setup on Yellowfin and smaller Bluefin but the fast action with the high power tends to flip live bait For Halibut, the action and power work well to drive the hook and the Carbonx drags keep the line from surging on runs.

    Biggest difference between the quality you pay for in rods typically comes down to feel(sensitivity) and weight. When it comes to reels, your looking at quality of parts and weight. Cheap parts to lighten rod or reel, or quality lightweight parts for more money. Not saying you can't convert reels for a fraction of the price (ie. Senator 114 conversions using SS gears, double dog, gear sleeve, Tib frame, 7 + 1 Carbonx drags, oversize T handle and offset arm).

    Most important is proper pairing of Rod length, action, power and class reel with quality components and proper line.

    Budget reel, Shimano TLD 25, rock solid performance for a good price. Penn GLD has better guts but everything else can be upgraded on the TLD to exceed the GLD.

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    Ok, I just looked at the G.Loomis Halibut rod online and have a couple of thoughts/opinions.

    First off, I notice that the rod incorporates at least two roller guides (the tip, and the guide closest to the reel seat) judging from the pictures on Loomis' website. This is important based on what type of line you are planning to use. If you plan on using spectra/braid (which is what I highly recommend for jigging), the roller guides may cause some issues. The thickness (or lack thereof of spectra) may cause the spectra to bind in the rollers, depending on the clearance between the wall of the guide and the roller. This may or may not become an issue, but I personally wouldn't risk it. Where you see roller guides on rods is for fishing for big pelagics: big sharks, marlin, giant tuna, etc. Big powerful fish that destroy drags and fray line. These are on heavy duty 130 setups with big mono lines. There's no need for roller guides on a halibut rod.

    Second, which is all personal preference, but the action is listed as "fast". This means that there is a "shutoff" point close to the tip where the rod will bend. Most of the bend in the rod will be in the top 1/3 of the rod, by the tip. What this means for the angler is that most of the pressure will be applied to you, rather than the fish. To illustrate what I mean, imagine you are holding a 4 foot wooden dowel with a 20lb weight attached to one end by a 3 foot piece of string. You are holding the dowel on the end opposite of the weight. Imagine the force that it would take to lift that weight up, say a few feet. Now, imagine a wooden dowel with the same setup, except that the dowel is a foot long. Which setup is going to be easier to lift the weight up with? The shorter one. If you don't believe me, try it. The point I am trying to make, is that a rod with a "parabolic" bend, i.e. it will bend all the way through the grip, will give you more lifting power and put more of the strain on the fish.

    I know that I probably sound like a salesperson by this point but having used a japanese style butterfly jigging rod (Jigging Master Power Spell 150g), I can't go back to the traditional western pool cue style rods. These rods are really light, have sensitive tips so you can really work the jigs and have a feel for what is going on down below, and have a lot of power. I used to think shimano trevalas were decent rods (they are not parabolic by the way, though a lot of people will say they are), but now I think those rods are rubbish. Just another pool cue to me now (though better than some other pool cues, but not by a large margin).

    Here's a video of a Jigging Master Power Spell (200g) being used to catch a 73lb halibut. This video does a good showing the parabolic bend of the rod:


    I was so impressed by these Jigging Master rods, that I bought another one, this time custom built to my specs. A 400g Power Spell in an acid wrap configuration. This is overkill for halibut (my 150g works good for chickens, and should work for all but the biggest halibut you would normally encounter) but I had it built for fishing for big yellowfin tuna off of a stationary platform (drillship), so I needed the extra power in order to turn the fish. Jigging Master ain't the only game in town, if you want a rod like this. The black hole cape cods would be a good candidate for halibut jigging (the 250g would probably be perfect) and they are only $30 more than the G. Loomis halibut rod. Or if you don't mind spending slightly more money, Jigging Master make great rods. These rods, as well as some other great rods can be found here: http://www.jignpop.com/categories/Ro...eatured&page=1

    For a higher price point, you can have a rod built for you, which I did for my most recent purchase. Check out JPR rods on the East Coast, they build some great rods and have rods in a variety of different price points. Paul is good to deal with. Here's the site: http://jprrods.com/store/

    I know that was long winded, but I just wanted to bring some other great rods to your attention. These rods are not popular, and not even really known at all up on the North West coast in Canada and Alaska, but they should be. So much more enjoyable to fish with than the traditional rods used up there. They are a bit more expensive, but trust me, it's worth it!

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    I should add that the Jigging Master Power Spells are around the same price as the G. Loomis, I made a mistake in my first point. Now, bear in mind that I have no experience with the G. Loomis halibut rod, but given the specs of each, I would take the Power Spell over the G. Loomis, especially given the price differences (or lack thereof). However, if you get a Power Spell custom built, it will add a couple more pennies to the price.

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    This my chick pole.... ImageUploadedByTapatalk1341688399.605932.jpgThe girls love this pole. Whopper stomper with avet

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    Thanks all for the advice. Sounds like there are plenty of options out there, and that I have to do a bit more homework before buying. I think I will pass on the Loomis I mentioned and will look into some of the alternatives mentioned here.

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