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Thread: August trip

  1. #1

    Default August trip

    Morning everyone, I'm trying to get some into concerning my fishing trip in August. My father, brother and I are flying in on the 14th for a week of flyfishing for trout and salmon. We will be doing a fly-in fishing trip one day during the week but am also interested in any day hike in fishing options on the Kenai peninsula or surrounding area. Any suggestion would be great, Thanks, Nate

  2. #2
    Member Scottsum's Avatar
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    Default Carter/ Crescent Lake Trail

    If you're looking for a hike to a remote and beautiful lake with incredible grayling fishing, I would definitely look into Crescent Lake. The trail is steep in spots, but is well maintained and the view up there is breath-taking. You can also catch nice Rainbows in Carter Lake on the way (the lakes are about a 20 minute walk apart, if I remember right).

    You can also try Fuller Lakes trail, which is a little shorter but the grayling in Fuller are stocked and much smaller than the natives in Crescent. The Rainbows in Carter are stocked as well, but there are some big boys in there for being a small lake.

    There are quite a few other lakes in the Swanson River drainage that have excellent fishing as well as on the Resurrection Trail, Johnson Pass Trail and others. I would encourage you to get a hold of some topo maps of the area and pick one according to the time you want to spend. Most of these hikes are somewhat strenuous, so you'll want to be sure everyone is in at least decent shape. (and bring bug dope!)

    If you don't want to deal with the steep inclines, The Swanson river lakes might be a good option. The area there is pretty flat and some of those lakes are only a mile or less off the road. For many of these, you should look into renting a canoe or bringing along a float tube. You could check with Max at http://www.alaskacanoetrips.com/index.html for more info about this option. His business is located in Sterling, near Swanson river road and he is very familiar with the area. He's also a moderator and regular contributor to this forum.

    good luck

  3. #3
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default

    There are some books that would help you tremendously. This is my first suggestion to you and some links are below.


    Lots of places to go on the Kenai. Like anywhere else, the further you are willing to walk/hike, the less people you will see. But you will need to keep in mind the fitness level of your weakest member in doing so. Many of the lakes have state owned cabins you can rent for like $45/night and often include a boat. This would make a nice overnighter if nothing else. It may be your best (possibly only) chance for any real solitude as well. You will want to keep an eye open for bears as you travel.


    A guided hike-in trip with Troutfitters in Cooper Landing would be a good day trip. One that you could replicate alone on another day or two of your trip after doing so. For this reason, I would do the guided hike-in fishing early on in the trip. They are very reputable and have a fly shop in Cooper Landing. I will put their link below as well.




    This book is a great general book on fishing the Kenai. Some hike in lakes are mentioned and a great deal of emphasis is on the rivers/streams. Good book.

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/sto...products_id=94




    The below book is one of my absolute favorites. Over 100 maps in the book. Each chapter is a geographic area of Alaska, and of course the Kenai has its own chapter. Tons of suggestions on where to fish, and better yet, exactly how to get there. A must read for someone visiting for the first time. Great resource. Pages 54-132 are on the Kenai

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/sto...products_id=75



    http://www.aktroutfitters.com/





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    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks for the info guys and I ordered one of the books already. Going to be a great trip. Would you recommend any campgrounds in the area and a good remote fly-in fishing charter service?

  5. #5
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Order the other book.

    Check into Moose Pass. There is a pilot there that can fly you into some of the lakes in that area, but as mentioned, you can hike to most of them. The flight from Moose Pass is $300 per person round trip from what I was told the other week. Looking in my book here "Flyfisher's Guide to Alaska" I see Scenic Mountain Air listed as a bush pilot in Moose Pass.

    For camping, the Russian River CG and Quartz Creek CG are centrally located. There are a dozen or more, these two names just come to mind. They are all listed in the book I told you about by Scott Haugen.

    First thing you should do is plan your fishing trips and then pick out where to stay. Try to keep from driving all over the place. Lots of campgrounds in the area. Seward to be included. You may find it easier to spend a few days here, a few there, a night or two in one of the state cabins on the lake, etc... There is some merit to being mobile.

    In Cooper Landing, the author suggest booking flights through Gwin's Lodge. They have a great website with lots of fishing info so check out that website either way.

    For mid August, I suggest you read up on the Ninilchik River on the way to Homer. Should be some good silver fishing then. There is a good write up on it in the book mentioned above. It is on my to do list as the fishing can be great there.





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    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member Scottsum's Avatar
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    Default Another book

    Another book that is indespensible for any Alaskan road trip is Gunnar Pedersen's The Highway Angler. I used this book for the first time on a road trip from Kenai to Fairbanks and back last August and had a blast. He's right-on on all the mileposts and access points and I didn't find any he missed. The only thing I would say is that he is pretty negative on the fishing reports in some areas. A few of the streams he rated as poor-fair, I would call fair to good or even good to excellent. Of course, it all depends on the day you're there and your definition of good fishing I suppose. I don't mind fishing a few hours for one 20+ inch rainbow if the it's a sunny day, on a beautiful stream and I have it entirely to myself. Add a bear, a couple of eagles and a caribou in the distance and you've got an incredible day, even if Mr. Pedersen thinks the fishing is poor. This book is definitely one to have in the rental car.

    Here's the link: http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/sto...&products_id=3

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    Member Sapper 27's Avatar
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    I second the Highway Angler...tore up some silvers in August on the Rabideux! Good book!

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    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    Once you are in the Kenai river drainage its pretty simple find a trail, hike untill you see water that looks good, then fish it.
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  9. #9
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    How is your trip planning coming along? Finding all the info you need? PM if not, maybe I can point you in the right direction. You have an amazing trip coming up. With that said, good planning now will pay big dividends in August
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default What kind of trip?

    One thing struck me about Scottsum's Crescent Lake/ Trail suggestion is how much I would enjoy a hike like that with a couple of my family visiting. Hiking, scenery, time to talk during the hike... yep, much to be said for a trip like that.

    But the focus is different. If the focus is fishing, might be an advantage to fishing with a guide. It's likely the guide fished your waters-of-interest recently, and has a better idea what's working at the time. Especially in a 14-day trip - a guide can help with location, technique, gear and plan B if the fish aren't cooperating that day... things that could improve the returns in a 14-day trip.

    Remote fly-in fishing air charters... I don't know.

  11. #11
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
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    If I were fly in fishing somewhere I'd go to Alexander Lake and catch pike, most places with easy access see a ton of people. You could take a flight from homer over to brooks camp too, the fishing will be awesome but you won't be alone (lots of tourists and bears)
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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