Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 55

Thread: Chimney fire what to do and not to do?

  1. #21
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    615

    Default

    Fire extinguisher will generally hold a charge for a long time the problem is you need to flip them up side down from time to time so the powder does not compact inside. Meaning that it maybe old and if needed it may be usable but not at a 100%. Do to the powder being compacted over time.

    Chimney code NFPA 211 requires SS pipe to start at the ceiling and throu the roof. It can be triple wall or double wall HT (high temp) and you have the obtion on pipe from stove to ceiling box. The best is a double wall interior pipe it has a 304 SS inner pipe and a black outer wall.

    Chemfex was the best on the market untill it went out of business too bad. I do not think its a good idea if you have a chimney fire going to take a bunch of hot burning ember out of a hot stove. Thing could go down hill from there if you spill some of that in a panic. Using the Fire extinguisher on short burst is probily your best bet and shut the stove down that will start to cut off the air to the fire and choke it out.

    Have it cleaned and inspected before you useing it again to insure that it did not crack or seperate any pipe further up in the chimney.

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  2. #22
    Member gogoalie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Marshall
    Posts
    1,975

    Default I had my first...

    Chimney fire this winter, the creasoot caught on fire on the very top of the chimney, all I did was climb the roof, & pour snow down the chimney, then banged on the sides of the pipe & I could hear the creasoot falling down into the stove...I opened up the stove when I came back into the house, & sall all the soot on fire inside the stove...I closed the flue & never had another fire...
    The SOA, in the interest of preserving AK N8v Culture, should be allowing unfettered access for subsistence, this would have a two tier benefit, reduced welfare rolls, & reduced health care costs.

  3. #23

    Default

    We a had a stove pipe / chimney fire last winter. I guess we had to small of stove pipe install. We doused the fire with water and install new stovepipe.

  4. #24
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,255

    Default

    I remember when I was a kid, that we would be woke up every morning by the banging on the stove pipe, and there was Dad with a pair of gloves on smacking the pipe. ( Fire still smoldering) You could hear the stuff falling out of the pipe. Then it was " you boys need to get out there and get the wood in before school, and on top of the barrel stove we had a Home Com. wood cook stove that takes small split chuncks. And if we wanted dinner we better get enough wood in to cook supper.

    Oh those were the days.

  5. #25
    Member 1stimestar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    728

    Default

    Friend had one and threw a pan of water in it and shut it down. He had the chimny sweep come and inspect it all and said it basically steam cleaned the whole pipe.
    Alaska, the Madness; Bloggity Stories of the North
    http://cloud9doula.wordpress.com/

    Does this shotgun make my butt look big?

  6. #26
    Member Maast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    510

    Default

    I'd think the best means of dealing with chimney fires is not to have one which means not to allow the creosote to condense in the first place.

    When my new stove was installed they ran a stainless steel liner up the old metal chimney leaving a gap of about 2 inches all the way around.

    I stuffed kaowool in the gap at the bottom and got up top and poured a little bit of high temperature concrete (mix of concrete and vermiculite - no sand), enough for about a 3 inch layer.

    I let that cure for a week then filled up the rest with a LOT of perlite (4 of those big bags from Lowes) It insulates the stack and keeps it hot. I originally did it to increase the stove draw - which it did, but a side benefit I've noticed is that the stove pipe stays squeaky clean except for the last 4 inches that are outside the insulated area and exposed to cold air, and even that doesnt accumulate much creosote.

    I've had it in place now for 3 years and each time I go up there to check there isnt hardly any creosote and I've never had to clean it.

    The way I burn is: start a fire and let it go with the dampers full open for about 45 mins, then choke it down and let it burn at a much reduced level for the rest of the day/night. If I dont choke it down the house gets way too hot real quick.

  7. #27
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    1

    Default Chimfex stick's are around.

    These sticks are around. How good they work, I'm not sure; nor did the fire chief I spoke to who responded to my stack fire not 20 minutes after I had one in my hand at a store and put it back on the shelf at $45 bucks a pop. In responce to an older post, heres some skinny on these:

    Chimfex is Manufactured by the:
    Standard Fusee (thats right FUSEE) Co.
    Peru, Ind.
    Item #3412

    Main Distributor is:
    Rutland fire clay Co.
    P.O.B 340
    Rutland, Vt. 05702-0340
    E-mail: sales@ rutland.com
    www.Rutland.com

    My FD chief told me creosote has properties that cause a corrosion of the pipe from inside out. Beings my single walled pipe is 24 year's old and seasoned, although I haven't burned wood every year at all, my pipe had corroded through. I almost lost my place. It was close!!

    Figuring the metalbestos was certainly compromised up above-I'm not burning any more till my whole system is replaced.

    Hope this helped.

  8. #28
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    California
    Posts
    328

    Default I've cooked and warmed with wood stoves most all my life

    It is standard procedure to clean the stove and pipe out every spring, both with the chimney brush and taking it apart where possable. One of the reasons we took it apart , is to check for flaws in the pipe and I set it up with a section of horizontal pipe(3' verticle, 4' horizantal , then verticle up and out) to amplify the quality of burn at the stove . hence the pipe never got very hot. a 600 degree temp at the base of the pipe and 8' up the pipe you could hold your hand on it . We burned soft wood and hard wood together, which kept the pipe pretty clear through the winter, but being so cold so close to the stove I could not be ignored come spring.
    For the effeciency of the wood consumed , It was worth the extra effort in the spring to clean it.
    I used half the wood my friends did , in homes the same style and size.

  9. #29

    Default

    Iv had my stack catch on fire once or twice, though i have a SS pipe running through a brick chimney, i shut off all the air i could and monitord

  10. #30
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    615

    Default Chimfex

    Chimfex was the best product on the market and as far as i know it still is. I had a chimney cleaning and install company for many years in CO. Creosote does not eat away SS pipe; but it will cause rust in black pipe overtime. Burning green or water soaked wood and dampening down the stove too much will cause heavy build up in the chimney.
    Too many elbows reduce the draw of the chimney and will slow the flue gas down and when doing so it lets it cool in the chimney and condense on the walls.
    What Chimfex does on a chimney fire is to cut off the air to the fire that is in the chimney. If the stove and chimney are in good condition in the beginning it will snuff out the fire pretty quickly.
    The chimney from top to bottom should be checked by a chimney sweep and or cleaned before future burning to ensure that the pipe is still intact.
    I hope this helps some.
    Regards

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  11. #31
    Hello12
    Guest

    Default Chimfex

    Chimfex is back! You will be able to find information regarding this product at www.rutland.com

  12. #32
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    MI
    Posts
    6

    Default Chimfex

    I bought some of the Chimfex a couple months ago at www.chimneylinerinc.com so it's still available, works great when the old chimney decides to flare up.

  13. #33
    Member Music Man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    ANC
    Posts
    711

    Default

    Walmart in anchorage had 5 sticks left about 2 weeks ago on sale for $5 each,needless to say I bought all 5! Might be worth asking them for more?
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  14. #34

    Default Fire

    Quote Originally Posted by sweepint View Post
    I was a chimney sweep for many years and part of a V- fire dept. fIRST DO NOT PUT WATER ON THE FIRE IF YOU HAVE A GLASS DOOR.

    It sounds like a train or tornado in the stove.
    The problem with fire extinguishers are that the main fire is in the chimney not in the fire box. You may get it snuffed out but i would not hold my breath on it.
    The best product on the market is called chimfex, it looks like a road flare. What you do is, in the event of a chimney fire you strike it like a road flare and toss it in the fire box and close the door. Next cut off all combustion air to the stove.
    The chimney pipe is or should be HT rated, you should have it checked out after it is out and before you put a fire back in the stove. I have seen pipe exspan apart with excessive heat from a chimney fire. b
    The next problem is why you had a chimney fire in the first place.
    Answer; poor burning habits
    Hope this helps.
    Regards T
    A good tool to have is the all new sureshotfire extinguishuer port.Check it out at www.sureshotfire.com

  15. #35
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    615

    Default

    Hi Joe
    That is a neat tool but you will not be able to use that with double wall interior pipe. The way it looks is the only app would be with single wall pipe which is fine but 50% or more of the installation are with double wall inside and class A once threw the ceiling.
    Is there an adapter that would pass through the second wall?

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  16. #36
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,586

    Default

    If you read the SPAM'd website in the product section, you'll see that it does work with double wall pipe. You drill 2 holes.

    For all practical purposes, if you don't have Chemfex, then keep a quart or two of water in a wide open-top pitcher with a handle on it. In the event of chimney fire, swing the door open, pitch the entire container of water into the stove, and then slam the door shut. The water is going to rapidly turn to steam, which will carry up the chimney as it expands up to 1700 times its volume as water. It will immediately displace oxygen from the chimney and have a huge cooling effect at the same time.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  17. #37
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    615

    Default

    JOAT
    good quick fix but has you ever done that with a wood stove w/ glass door. If not the glass will explode to some extent needless to say there are better ways to put out a chimney fire.
    Now if the stove does not have a glass door that will work fine and the worst outcome is some warped or over temper metal in the stove.


    I looked at the web site and could not find a double wall app for that, I understand that you will have to drill through the interior wall. The app appeared to be surface mounted with rivets to the pipe. The issue is that the tube has to pass through the interior wall as well; if it does not then one has defeated the purpose of having double wall pipe. Double wall pipe has to have a cushion of air that circulates in order to reduce the clearance to combustibles.

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  18. #38

    Default

    Hi back .Its for a single wall pipe and a double pipe. You will need to drill the outer pipe with a 2" bit frist then change over to a 3/4" bit it will work.

    Just go to the web site at sureshotfire.com and look at the instructions it will tell you how to install it .Or you can call me at 1-616-675-3086.And i can help you with it. thanks 4 checking it out.

    With water yes water will cool the fire down 2 fast and it will warpe the pipes fast but with a ABC extinguisher you r cooling the chimney fire down slow. and putting the fire out. We have tested this for six years. ABS powder is the best on the market . we have tested at jsh mfg.And it works
    Last edited by Michael Strahan; 11-18-2011 at 19:56.

  19. #39
    Member JOAT's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Soldotna, ALASKA since '78
    Posts
    3,586

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sweepint View Post
    JOAT
    good quick fix but has you ever done that with a wood stove w/ glass door. If not the glass will explode to some extent needless to say there are better ways to put out a chimney fire.
    Now if the stove does not have a glass door that will work fine and the worst outcome is some warped or over temper metal in the stove.


    Why the heck would you have a glass door on a wood stove?!? I've seen 'em on some commerically built fire places, but never on a real wood stove.



    I looked at the web site and could not find a double wall app for that,

    They have the double wall directions on this page... http://sureshotfire.com/instructions/ Though it's a pretty chincy installation method if you ask me. Not to mention rivets through the pipe wall. Something like this should be welded to the stove's pipe jack where you have some "real" metal.

    Finally, this stuff about warping stoves with a quart of water is horse-pucky... unless you're building your stoves from a 55-gallon drum (stupid idea). Real stoves are made of steel. A dry chem will certainly work, but so will a quart of water. The water turns to steam within seconds and will hardly affect the temperature of the stove's structure. It will quickly rise up the chimney as expanding, oxygen-free steam and snuff out the fire. Then you just need to be prepared for a rekindle.

    When the fire department shows up, we are going up on the roof to dump a whole bunch of water down the pipe if there is so much as a flame visible when we get there (yes, I did this for many years). Then we're going to crawl around in the house for the entire length of the stack checking for heat that cause a 2nd fire. It ain't gonna be pretty when we're done... but the insurance should cover it.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  20. #40
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,620

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    ...Finally, this stuff about warping stoves with a quart of water is horse-pucky... unless you're building your stoves from a 55-gallon drum (stupid idea). Real stoves are made of steel. A dry chem will certainly work, but so will a quart of water. The water turns to steam within seconds and will hardly affect the temperature of the stove's structure. It will quickly rise up the chimney as expanding, oxygen-free steam and snuff out the fire. Then you just need to be prepared for a rekindle....
    JOAT, if you're referring to Joe's post, he was talking about warping the pipe, not the stove itself...

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://www.alaskahuntplanning.com/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •