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Thread: Tents

  1. #1
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    Default Tents

    Just wondering what is a good tent for moose or caribou hunting in different locations with wind and rain? I'm in the military so I'm not looking for anything expensive, just something that will keep me warm and not very big maybe 2 or 3 man tent. I've been looking around at different tents to see how they would handle under heavy wind, and there is not to many, any advice would also be much appreciated. Thanks

  2. #2
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    The two tents that I have been looking at right now are both from Cabelas, Eureka Tetragon, and the Cabelas westwind, any further opinions and help would be awesome.

  3. #3

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    Some food for thought. You spend $$$ for clothing, fuel, transportation, weapon, and other gear to go hunting. Don't skimp on the main piece of gear that will house you and all your gear. If your tent fails, the best thing that can happen is your hunt ends and you go home. It could end much worse. When you look at a tent ask yourself if it will stand up to winds that blow shingles off roofs or will it stop horizontal rain for days. If I were in your shoes I would look for a quality used tent before I bought a new less expensive camping tent. Look for deals. A few years ago I found a $350 two man tent by Eureka in the Cabelas bargain cave for $170. There was a like new Cabelas Outfitter 4 man tent on craigslist for $160 a few days ago. It's gone now but I would look for deals like that. When I was in the military I used to rent gear cheap from base. See what they have. Good luck.

  4. #4

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    My opinion would be to head to REI or another store along those lines and see what they have. That way you can see them set up, crawl in and see how you like it. If you don't live close to any place like, this get online and look. What you want to look for is a tent that has a rain-fly that goes all the way to the ground, all the way around the tent. It's unbelievable how many companies make decent tents and then leave a big gap in the fly right in front of the door! Most of the good manufacturers offer vestibules in front of the doors which is a great option. As far as brands go, look at: North Face, Sierra Designs, REI, Mountain Hardwear, just to name a few. REI usually offers pretty good bang for the buck on their lines. Especially when they are on sale. I have seen some decent eureka tents. I'm not real familiar with what cabelas is offering these days.

  5. #5
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Another approach...

    find out what Outdoor Rec has available for rent.
    Then post a question about those models - keeping in mind that one factor might be where you hunt -- whether it's open tundra or other terrain.

    Or do a search of AOD (Search, Advanced Search, Google).

    Could be more money for your air charter, gear rental, etc.

    Best of luck.

  6. #6
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    Arctic Oven with wood stove, hands down no comparison. I know you said smaller and less expensive, I used to think that too till I spent a cold and wet moose season in an Oven and bought one the day I got back.

  7. #7
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    My wife and I float arctic rivers each fall. We use a Black Diamond guiding light. Big tent for two, freestanding, packs to 12" x 9" and only weights 5 lbs. Just an amazing design. Drum tight and single wall so there is no flapping noise at night. Been in driving rain on a SW float trip and not a drop in the tent. Been on a trip 130 miles north of the arctic circle and had 30+ mph winds and the tent did not budge. Can't say enough about this tent.

    http://www.hermitshut.com/bldiguli4pet.html


    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  8. #8
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Default

    There are different tents for different uses...float hunts, back pack hunts, ATV's and fly-ins.

    My heavier ATV/float/fly-in tent is a Eureka K2 XT. I can't say enough good things about this tent.

    My backpack tent right now is a borrowed MSR Hubba Bubba that I split the weight with another partner. Backpack hunts are off my radar right now because of my kids, so I rely on the heavier tent more often.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  9. #9
    Member AKFishOn's Avatar
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    Default Eureka

    A good tent for a decent price: http://www.eurekatent.com/filterTool.aspx?cID=7 try Eureka. If you don't have to battle big winds they are a good price for what you get.

    I have had this 4 man tent put up when it hailed more than 2 inches in Montana, I had it set up in the not the best of areas for that. Had two cots in it with a trap under the tent (to keep it clean as I was not expecting rain or hail), the hail melted and between the tent floor and the tarp was like a water bed, however no water came through. I got this 4 man Eureka tent 22 years ago, and this trip to Montana was 7 years ago, still use it as my easy to pack/real easy to set up road side camping tent, has always works well in the rain and will easily sleep 2 kids and 2 adults or 2 adults with cots and gear.

    Not expedition gear but a good tent for a good price.
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    AKFISHON, I did like the APEX 2XT and also the Timberline 2 because the fly on both tents strech all the way down to the ground. Thanks for the help.

  11. #11
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    if you have time early in the morning head to REI in Anchorage to look at tents that are on sale, if there are any left. I got a 1 person MSR Hubba for $84! on sale from $250! if you know you won't ever be doing backpack hunting, go with a heavier bomber tent. if that is in your future, save money and get something that applies to float hunting and backpack hunting.

    REI, AMH, and Outdoor Rec all rent out tents. I would check them out if you're on a budget.

    good luck

  12. #12
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Default

    BB78- I also have a Eureka Pinnacle Pass 3XTA and it's a decent tent. Not Kodiak kind of tough, but it does well in the Interior and South Central for moose hunting. It would be fine also for most caribou areas. Lots of room, two big vestibules, and full size entrances on each side of the tent so you don't have to climb over anyone to get out when nature calls.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  13. #13
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Eureka tents...

    well thought of in other threads/sources. I'm researching for a family float tent/s. The bacpackgeartest website also has useful winter reading.

    Eurekas: seems Mike Strahan has used a Eureka with good results in the past; Timberline 4 maybe? I noticed a Eureka or two at Barney's Sports Chalet when I was in there last month. Bob is very selective about what occupies his retail space.

    Here's a thread on Eurekas:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?p=60425

    A review on the Eureka Timberline 2XT, $189.90:
    http://www.backpackgeartest.org/revi...mas%20Vickers/

    Good thread on hunting tents: http://www.forums.outdoorsdirectory....ad.php?p=72148

    Tents under $175:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ead.php?t=9931

    And a good discussion of tents with many tents mentioned:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=25408

    Good luck.

  14. #14
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    Default Eureka timberline tents

    Don't get one if your going to hunt in Alaska, they will not hold up. Spent 2 weeks moose hunting with 2 of them and first big alaska penisula strom took them down in 20 minutes or so. the end pieces broke in the same place. Ended up spending the night in a much cheaper dome tent that took the wind alot better.


    Terry

  15. #15
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    Default

    I have never been a Eureka fan, and the last post shows why. If you are going to be out in harsh elements, why not buy gear that has been tested in harsh elements (North Face, Mountain Hardwear, Outdoor Research, Marmot, Patagonia, etc). The gear costs more, but it will last you a lot longer. Or buy a tent from REI (who makes good tents) and if it does break, simply return it at the store for a new one or refund.

  16. #16
    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default The Northface Heron and Merian

    Here are the spec.s on the Heron (199.95 Ebay, new version of the Merian) The big features I like are:
    3 poles (Strength and wind perfprmance.)
    Dual Vestibules
    Continous Pole Sleeves (Strength and wind performance)
    Full coverage fly
    Light weight
    I know Northface Tents are not usually cheap to purchase, but you can find new tents on Ebay and in REI's Outlet store (web). They are great tents.


    The North Face Heron 33 three season 3 person tent is great for the wild-at-heart wanderer or the week-end warrior. The Heron 33 has two huge screened doors for those who love the fresh air and the DWR finished fly will keep you dry in un-friendly conditions. At five pounds 15 ounces, the Heron 33 is light enough for three-season backpacking trips. The Heron 33's freestanding design allows you to set up the tent and easily move it to avoid rocks and uneven surfaces. Internal pockets allow you to keep a headlamp, a book, and other quick-grab supplies handy. Added gear loops allow you to use The North Face number two Gear Loft with the Heron 33. Take this tent, and a couple friends into the thick of it and enjoy the surprising spaciousness of the Heron. So get out there, love nature, and remember "Never stop exploring."
    Features
    • Freestanding, dual-entry, three-person backpacking tent for three-season use
    • DAC Featherlite poles using reverse-combi technology with aluminum hubs
    • Silicone flysheet
    • Brow poles for additional vestibule space
    • Ultralight Micro-clip clip technology
    • Taped nylon taffeta true bucket floor
    • Color-coded flysheet attachments
    • High-low air circulation through mesh panels and doors
    • Multiple guy-points
    • Reflective guyline loops and zipper cording
    • Fly-only pitching
    • Internal pockets and hang loops
    • Compatible with The North Face #2 Gear Loft
    • Compression stuff
    Specifications
    • Model: Heron 33
    • Color: Drift Blue
    • Capacity:3
    • Avg Weight: 5 lbs 15 oz (2.69 kg)
    • Area: 37 square feet (3.4 square meters)
    • Canopy Fabric: 40 denier, 240T nylon ripstop
    • Fly: 40 denier, 238T nylon with silicone and 1500 mm PU
    • Floor: 70 denier, 210T nylon taffeta coated with 5000 mm PU
    • Vestibule Area: Front- 14 ft2 (1.3 m2) Rear- 14 ft2 (1.3 m2)
    • Stuffed Size: 22" x 7" (57 cm x 18 cm)
    • Poles: 3 (Diameter- 11.1 mm, 9.8 mm, 8.84 mm)


    Package Contents:
    • North Face Heron 33 Tent
    • Free Gift

  17. #17
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    Default Eureka

    you get what you pay for in tents , Timberline Outfitters are more heavy duty than the regular Timberline but I almost lost one to the wind a few years back . How about a Nallo ?

  18. #18
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Default

    Eureka tents are not junk. Certain Eureka tents are junk. Just like many NF tents are junk and many REI tents are junk. Hell, I wouldn't take my borrowed MSR Hubba Bubba to Kodiak, but it's a good tent.

    The Eureka K2 XT tent is an expedition grade tent. It is better by far than my now retired NF VE25 as far as quality goes. Very few things beat a good dome tent in the wind and either of these tents will do the job.

    I noticed in the second post that you mentioned the Tetragon. Forget it. It's junk and that's why it's less than $100.

    I have a NF that I don't know what the name is...the one on the right...that has been my gear tent for years. It's unbelievably bad to sleep in. Condensation is huge and the zippers are junk. It just happens to be light, has a HUGE side entry door and holds up in the wind..so we bring it along for gear. Not all tents are created equal because of who made them.

    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  19. #19
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Your results may vary...

    Budget will sure drive much of your decisions, "I'm in the military so I'm not looking for anything expensive..." -

    In another thread, an AOD member ended up buying from another AOD member: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=44426
    He had a specific price point and found gear he thought worth trying. I guess you're in the same boat. This is also a good time for pre-Spring inventory sales (REI, Sierra Trading Post, Campmor, others). Some people have good luck with Craigslist too. If you find something that looks good to you, post the details here and ask for input.

    Here's another perspective on cost: if your military assignment keeps you in Alaska for 3 years, 3 seasons, and you expect to sell the tent when you leave, you might recapture half or more of the price of the tent - if it's a tent that attracts buyers. Some here might buy your Eureka and some probably won't. But whatever you decide, they're your dollars - and you need some rationale if you're going to spend more. If you buy a $600 Hilleberg and take care of it - a $300 resale could be easy. Your cost - $300, or maybe less .

    Experienced AK outdoorsmen have seen harsh conditions here. No doubt a bad gear experience here will make you buy better gear for the next time.
    Alaska weather can be harsh and good preparation is prudent, but before Hilleberg, North Face, Eureka, gore tex, silnylon, gps, stainless steel...there were hunters and others who pursued the outdoors and apparently did fine. AOD is a great place to solicit ideas and search (Search, Advanced Search, Google search of forums) for more input, but at some point, the main thing is to get out there. Best of luck.

  20. #20

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    I have used a LOT of highend mountain tents for 40+ years, here in BC, where conditions are much like what I have seen in AK. I will simply say that, after owning three and using two Hilleberg tents, I am not likely to ever buy another brand.

    For two guys, a superb choice is the " Saivo" and, while heavy as backpacking tents go, it WILL keep you safe, dry and comfy in the WORST conditions. For a solo base camp, I would choose the "Jannu" model and expect the same service.

    You GET what you PAY FOR in gear and Hilleberg tents simply are the BEST and easiest to erect quickly and keep dry in a real storm. BTDT.

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