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Thread: Small drip on Woodstove Stack Adaptor

  1. #1

    Default Small drip on Woodstove Stack Adaptor

    I installed a new wood stove and metalbestos stack this past summer. Yesterday I noticed small drips of water coming down on the woodstove off of the "lower bucket" of the ceiling support. I climbed to the top of the roof and checked for any icing, but didn't see any. I climbed in the attic and removed the insulation protection shield and didn't notice any moisture or water there either. I finally swept the chimney and it continues to drip. The water has a brown tint to it and smells like creosote, which makes me believe it's coming from inside the stack towards the outside and then dripping. The woodstove has been running pretty much non-stop for almost 2 months now. This drip just started yesterday and I'm trying to determine how to stop it because it drips on the stove and smells/stains the stove and house. My initial thought was to remove the single wall stovepipe from the stove up to the dripless adaptor and look up inside to see if the metalbestos inner overlap was damaged and letting moisture through. Other than that, I guess the next step would be to jack up the stack and pull out the dripless adaptor and reinstall/seal it. When I installed it I didn't put any high temp silicone or anything on that joint, but am thinking about trying to pump it full of high temp silicone this evening from the inside. Anybody have this happen to them or know of a fix? Thank you very much.

  2. #2
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    Could it be the way you have your stove pipe assembled? As the pipe goes up you want the piece above to fit inside the lower piece. This keep the creosote drips inside the flue pipe.

  3. #3

    Default

    James,
    All of the piping above the adaptor is the metalbestos type and was put in with the inner piping lapping so everything drips down to the stove. I really think that the issue might be right where the adaptor connects to the metalbestos. I think that the inner wall there might be damaged or crushed and has allowed water to get through and drip down into the ceiling support.

  4. #4
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Are you using a Metalbestos DSAC or DSA. The DSAC actually locks into the pipe with a twist and uses a locking band. In my opinion that's the best connection. A DSA just slides onto the Metalbestos. A DSAC makes disconnection a little more difficult, but offers a better seal.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  5. #5

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    AKDoug,
    I have the DSAC, or twist lock type. Still perplexing as to how water is getting out, but it's obviously not "dripless" so far.

  6. #6
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I don't know what the issue is. I have yet to have a woodstove that didn't leak a little bit. Usually it leaked out the damper holes on my stoves.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  7. #7

    Default Drip Continues

    Well, last night I took out the single wall pipe from the stove to the adaptor. I looked up and saw that there was about an 1/8" gap by the seam of the inside of the Metalbestos pipe where it couples to the adaptor. I took some fire caulk and packed it around the entire seam at that spot to keep any moisture from getting out. I waited and then made a small fire as the directions said. Within 20 minutes however, the thing started dripping again. It stopped dripping the entire time I had the stove off, but was back to it once the heat began. I think what is going on here is this. I think the insulation on the piece of Metalbestos just above the adaptor has become saturated with water. I think this because it took 2 months for this problem to show up. During those 2 months, the moisture has been slowly wicking and getting up into the insulation. Now, whenever there's heat, it's pushing the moisture towards the exterior of the pipe, which is saturated as well. The water finds the path of least resistance, which is through the seam between those two pieces and it finds its way out into the lower bucket and drips. I could be way out in left field, but this weekend I'm going to jack up the stack and pull that transition piece and section of metalbestos to see what's going on. I might just buy a new section, install it with the fire caulk packed around the seam and see how it goes. Nobody at the local wood stove place had heard of this issue before, so I guess I have some kind of freak drip.

  8. #8
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I've been selling Metalbestos for over 20 years and haven't heard of it either. There's a first for everything, though. Let us know what you find out.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  9. #9
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    We have the same problem with our stove pipe. Found we had a gap on the storm collar. Was letting in rain and snow when tall enough.
    Also have ice bulidup on the top of the cap that would drop and melt when it was heavy enough or dislodged by wind or if enough heat made it to the top.

  10. #10

    Default Leak Stopped

    Here's the latest update. I fired up the woodstove last night with my foil "coller" and coffee can to catch any drips. The foil coller was made from a 16 inch aluminum disposable pizza/pie pan. I just cut it to fit tightly around the stack and made a small spout to direct the drips into the coffee can below. I had a 8' step ladder with a board hanging out to set the coffee can on. I didn't want the drips to drop too far and splatter and wasn't sure about leaving the can on the woodstove top. Anyways, I fired up a small hot fire and got the stack pretty hot (400F). Within 20 minutes the smelly creosote water started dripping out. As the temperature increased up to around 500 on the stack it started to drip faster. Then, within 10 minutes, the drips almost completely stopped. As of 2AM this morning, it hasn't dripped. I'm guessing the moisture trapped in that insulation has been removed by the heat. I'm still keeping my foil/can drip catch in place just in case, but it looks good now.

  11. #11
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    The drip should be comming from inside the pipe if it has creosote in it.If the flue smoke with the creosote is in your insulation I think you have bigger problems.Hot stack gas hiiting the colder outside air will cause some condensation and it will drip back down your stack.Smoke and creosote leaveing the stack and getting into your insulation is a bad deal.

  12. #12

    Default

    Amigo,
    I think what is in the insulation got into it through a gap that was between the single wall pipe and the inner wall of the metalbestos pipe. I sealed that gap with some fire caulk so no moisture, creosote, gases can get out again. There wasn't any ice/condensate on the outside of the pipe in the attic, so almost all of it must've been trapped inside the insulation. I've continued to burn fairly hot fires all day and it hasn't dripped anymore. I'm going to keep the fire going and get into the attic tomorrow and check everything out to make sure it looks good. I'll keep you posted if I find something else. At this point, I'm really happy I didn't have to jack the entire chimney up to pull that adaptor.

  13. #13
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default I had exactly that same problem

    When I bought my house with the Blaze King and single wall to Metalbestos already installed, there was no problem at all. About two years ago, however, it started to drip down the pipe onto the stove . I have installed many Metalbestos pipe systems, and never had a problem before, so I was baffled. I let the stove go out, then I took off the ceiling support and I checked the dripless adapter, and it was intact, so I went up into the attic and worked my way up the joints, loosening each joint flange and making sure the sections were screwed well into each other and seated. I even put a bead of HTV silicone around each joint before I screwed its flange back on. I checked the roof jack to make sure it was well sealed, and even the chimney cap to make sure there wasn't a hole in the last joint of pipe where it seated. When I re-fired the stove it did the same thing all over again. Over the course of the next year I tried several other fixes, but it continued to do the same thing and I had to always keep a foil drip pan to catch the creosote. The place would stink up if I forgot.

    To make a long story short, I finally got fed up with the house smelling like sour BBQ, ripped out all the old 'bestos, and put in a whole new run from stove to chimney cap, to the tune of about $500. I'm glad I did. Wish there was an easy fix, but for me there wasn't, and I still don't know what the matter was with the old run.

    I don't think they make Metalbestos as well as they used to, even if it is way more expensive than it used to be. I'm hoping this bunch lasts a while before I have to replace it too.

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