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Thread: Boat slip question

  1. #1

    Default Boat slip question

    Put my name on the wait list for a slip and started thinking. What are the practical differences between having an aluminum vs. fiberglass boat sitting in the water for 6 months of the year? Will the aluminum boat not corrode if you keep the zincs fresh? Will water penetration be an issue with a fiberglass boat? Right now I have an aluminum boat with one of the main reasons being I can trailer it much easier. With a slip I won't be dragging the boat around and could get a much heavier glass boat. I'm aware of the performance, weight, utility, and other differences of aluminum vs. fiberglass just never thought about a boat sitting in the water all summer. By the time I get the slip I might be on my next boat. Any thoughts on which type of boat sits in the water with fewer problems?

  2. #2
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    when i had my aluminum boat and a slip after my partner passed away i was using it about 1 week a month with my slope schedule. because of moss growth i needed to pull it every time and power wash it. so i left trailer there and paid annual parking and launch. just did not make sense so i gave up slip and it stayed clean. If you have planning hull and use it every w/e that probably would not be an issue. if it is a displacement hull it probably would not matter. as far as one material over another??? if hull is sound probably does not matter.
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  3. #3
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    The Fiberglass hull will absorb water and that is the cause of blisters. This can be avoided by painting the hull with a barrier coat, which is basically epoxy primer. This is the best way to deal with the water problems. The hull must be dry before it is coated and that may take several month and can be checked with a moisture meter. Next the bottom fouling can be controlled with the proper bottom paint. The barrier coat is generally a one time thing but the bottom paint(use a good ablative or dissolving paint) is a bi annual deal generally. It sound a lot worse than it is, the painting is done with rollers and the moisture meter can be found around any lumber yard or log cabin builder etc. I'm a fiberglass guy but thats why they make Chevys and fords.

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    Member jrogers's Avatar
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    Where are you wait listed at? If it is Whittier, a new technology (other than aluminum or fiberglass) may come out before you get your slip.

    Jim

  5. #5

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    Decided to go for a slip at Seward. Wanted one at Whittier, but didn't trust the "expected" wait time of 5 to 7 years. Talked to a couple of guys and sounds like the actual wait time is closer to 8 to 10 years. By this time my kids will be grown and we will have missed out on a lot of slip usage. Sounds like you have a good chance of getting a slip at Seward in under 5 years. Plus we enjoy the town of Seward and not so much the town of Whittier. Whittier and PWS is much better for sight seeing, camping, etc., but I think Seward is far better for fishing. My family loves to fish.

  6. #6

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    Something I don't see discussed much on the forum is the cost comparison of a trailerable boat vs a non-trailerable. My father sold a large trawler, it seemed that the difficulty in selling it was the parking issue. If that boat fit on a trailer the selling price would have been much more, but finding a buyer with a place to keep it can be difficult. I assume that the sales of trailerable and non-trailerable is affected greatly by slip availability.

  7. #7

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    That's a good point and part of the reason I was asking about the boat in a slip question. Right now I have a 27' pilothouse aluminum boat that I can trailer around. If I get a slip I figure I could sell this boat and buy a bigger fiberglass boat for a similar amount. I agree that the more difficult to trailer a boat the cheaper it is.

  8. #8
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Default Dittos

    Last June I purchased a 30ft Sea Ray. It is at the max for towing. I will need a permit to tow as it is 11 feet wide. What is the cost of a slip in Whittier and Seward per year once you are able to get one?

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  9. #9

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    Seward is $1400 for a 32' slip. Not sure about Whittier. A friend told me it was $1600 to $1800, but not certain.

  10. #10
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
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    4-5 years ago whittier was $1200, when i gave up my slip
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  11. #11

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    AKBassking, I'm sure you are aware of this, but others may not be. 10' to 12' wide also requires 1 pilot car in addition to the regular oversize stuff (beacon, signs, etc)

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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Homertime View Post
    AKBassking, I'm sure you are aware of this, but others may not be. 10' to 12' wide also requires 1 pilot car in addition to the regular oversize stuff (beacon, signs, etc)
    That's why I have the wife!!

    I have the boat in NC right now working on it. Alaska law is a little differant than down there. So long as I am not over 12' then I don't need a pilot car. This year NC pass a law that if you are under 12' you no longer need a permit and you can travel at night.

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  13. #13
    Member tzieli22's Avatar
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    Default For Seward

    I went with a fiberglass (Uniflite) for a few personal reasons but weight being the biggest reason. As for the boat sitting in the slip, if your not using it on a regular basis, it will have moss grow as mentioned. With my fiberglass boat, I use it weekly most of the time or by-weekly and in most cases once you run it on step, you pull most of the moss off. If you end up not using it that often the trick is to power wash your boat hull within 30 minutes or so to get the moss off and I can confirm that this does work.

    As for slip rates for Seward, here is the direct link for the rates of which, I know that I paid $1416.51 for my 32' boat... Keep in mind you will pay for the "over all length" including any attachments, i.e. anchor, swim platform etc.
    http://www.cityofseward.net/harbor/m...s2008taxes.pdf

    I also have a trailer for my boat, but much prefer having a slip over keeping it on a trailer. My personal preference anyway.

    And as a side note, my wait for my slip was about 20 months and this is my second season. The extra drive to Seward is much more worth it to me to be able to be boating now but I know many folks really like Whittier... I just didn't want to wait and not really know if I would ever get a slip there.

    Good luck...

  14. #14
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tzieli22 View Post
    I went with a fiberglass (Uniflite) for a few personal reasons but weight being the biggest reason. As for the boat sitting in the slip, if your not using it on a regular basis, it will have moss grow as mentioned. With my fiberglass boat, I use it weekly most of the time or by-weekly and in most cases once you run it on step, you pull most of the moss off. If you end up not using it that often the trick is to power wash your boat hull within 30 minutes or so to get the moss off and I can confirm that this does work.

    As for slip rates for Seward, here is the direct link for the rates of which, I know that I paid $1416.51 for my 32' boat... Keep in mind you will pay for the "over all length" including any attachments, i.e. anchor, swim platform etc.
    http://www.cityofseward.net/harbor/m...s2008taxes.pdf

    I also have a trailer for my boat, but much prefer having a slip over keeping it on a trailer. My personal preference anyway.

    And as a side note, my wait for my slip was about 20 months and this is my second season. The extra drive to Seward is much more worth it to me to be able to be boating now but I know many folks really like Whittier... I just didn't want to wait and not really know if I would ever get a slip there.

    Good luck...
    After getting beat up in my Wooly, and having to either tent camp or come back to Whittier every night, we decided to go glass.

    20 months huh? So do you leave it in the water year round or do you pull it in the winter but keep the slip?

    I was thinking of using Whittier. But slips are hard to come by. I was going to do the season parking lot and just leave my boat on the trailer. Tow it down once and back once. I am worried about theft in the lot.

    Anyone have problems with that in Whittier?

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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  15. #15
    Member tzieli22's Avatar
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    Default 20 months

    I have been told i was lucky because it usually takes 24 to 26 months, but still not bad. Yes I did pull it out for the winter... the winter king fishing has been not the best as I have been told and for the price of fuel, I felt it was better to pull it. For Seward, once you have a slip, you must continue to pay annually if you want to keep it, if not, you back on the list...

    Having someone watch your boat is a good business, folks in Seward want $300 to $400 to watch and take care of snow etc. which given the alternative I guess is not too bad. For me, pulling for the winter was best for me.

    As for the trailer option and theft, I have heard that some folks have had issues, but for me I have not. Most of the folks are honest but it only takes one....

  16. #16

    Question

    I bought a boat on Lake Union in Seattle once and also rented the slip I paid $150 a month for the slip. It was privately owned slips, about a dozen slips, for about twenty-five foot power and sail boats, surrounded by floating houses. One guy owned the whole place and was basicly the landlord. When I retrieved the boat and brought it here, I gave up the slip. My question is does anyone from out of state know if the parking situation is more open outside of Alaska? Seems in the magazines there is plenty of advertising for marinas/yards/etc. but I can't really get a grasp on the slip availability outside of Alaska from the mags.

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    Member AKBassking's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myers View Post
    My question is does anyone from out of state know if the parking situation is more open outside of Alaska? Seems in the magazines there is plenty of advertising for marinas/yards/etc. but I can't really get a grasp on the slip availability outside of Alaska from the mags.
    I think in Florida it is $10,000 annually in some spots and this is considered cheap!

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
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  18. #18

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    That does sound cheap! Some folks I know inquired about a slip for a 60ft Meridian luxuary yacht in Whittier, it would cost them 120k straight up! What is the waiting list's like in the lower 48? Do they even have waiting lists? I think about how cool it would be to have a good size vessel parked somewhere in the Washington/Seattle/Vancouver/etc., area waiting for you. You could fly down, stay on it, travel around and vacation on it during the winter. Be a snowbird with a boat!

  19. #19
    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKBassking View Post
    After getting beat up in my Wooly, and having to either tent camp or come back to Whittier every night, we decided to go glass.

    20 months huh? So do you leave it in the water year round or do you pull it in the winter but keep the slip?

    I was thinking of using Whittier. But slips are hard to come by. I was going to do the season parking lot and just leave my boat on the trailer. Tow it down once and back once. I am worried about theft in the lot.

    Anyone have problems with that in Whittier?
    we have slip in seward (32'). We put the boat in dry dock on a trailer all winter long because it just seems so much easier. I go down and check the boat every couple weeks and that's that. leaving it in the water is ok too, but every time it snows I get worried and end up going to check on it. good luck
    Boatless

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