Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 22

Thread: 24-28 ft boats

  1. #1
    Member AK_Stick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla AK (for now)
    Posts
    165

    Default 24-28 ft boats

    I'm looking at buying a 24-28 ft boat in the next two years. As of right now, I'd love to have a 26ft Glacier craft but thats probably out of my price range. So as it stands, I'm looking at these boats for fishing primarily in the PWS area.


    The 25 ft C-Dory Cruiser,


    and the SeaSport 26 ft Alaskan Pilot
    http://www.seasportboats.com/alaskanpilot.php


    Which would you choose, and why? Also, any other boats in this class I should look at?

  2. #2
    Member ken210's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Somewhere hot and dusty
    Posts
    156

    Default Well...

    Well for the price range of those 2 boats you have chosen they're a ton of boats in that price range. I'm guessing for the price of the Sea Sport you can afford a 26 or 27ft Glacier Craft. I haven't priced out the C-Dory but I'm assuming the boats in those 2 price range can very from Weldcraft, Hewescraft, GC, North river and Motion marine. But thats my .02 cents for what it's worth.

  3. #3
    Member DMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    1,412

    Default

    If the GC is out of your price range then the SeaSport will more than likely be unless you can find a used one. I am not sure on the C-Dory price. Also a difference between a glass and aluminum boat. Do you have a preference? A GC will be in the same ballpark as the Hewes, Weldcraft, etc. but the boats are way different from a construction stand point. When I ordered mine the 26' Hewes and 26' GC were within 10K of each other and the GC had more options.

    What are you looking for in a boat, day fishing, camping, hunting, 2-3 people, 5-6 people. All of this info helps when getting recommendations.

    Good luck!
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  4. #4
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    What well help also is go the upcoming baot show and talk to each dealer.
    What do you plan to do with your boat? This will help you narrow your boat choices
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  5. #5
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    I have to agree with Ken210 on this one. A 26 GC may even be cheaper than the same length Sea Sport. If you are looking at economy, it will be difficult to beat the C-Dory if you are looking for outboard(s). Personally, I prefer aluminum for what I do and they generally seem to hold their value better than the glass boats, too. T.R. Bauer will probably chime in here about the C-Dory. I know that he loves his.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  6. #6
    Member AK_Stick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla AK (for now)
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Sorry, I'm looking primarily at used boats. I've found a couple of the Sea Sports for sale in AK and WA in the 50-70K range thats as much as I can afford. I'd love to be able to plunk 100K down on a boat, but I don't feel like having to go on another deployment to pay for it.



    Alaska Gray, I'm currently deployed, so I'm going to miss the boat show.


    I'd like a boat for butt fishing, and hunting in the sound. In the summer it'd be day or maybe over night trips for butt, and bears in the spring, and in the fall it'd be long weekend or week trips in for hunting.

  7. #7
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    If you plan to hunt and beach your boat Aluminum is the way to go. Aluminum is cheaper the fiberglass, Fiberglass rides better in rough water due to it being heavier then Aluminum. Maintenance is another thing you should look at.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  8. #8
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    4,670

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK_Stick View Post
    Sorry, I'm looking primarily at used boats. I've found a couple of the Sea Sports for sale in AK and WA in the 50-70K range thats as much as I can afford. I'd love to be able to plunk 100K down on a boat, but I don't feel like having to go on another deployment to pay for it.
    For that price you can almost get a 25 foot GC built. You might try contacting them and see what they offer you, you just might be surprised.

  9. #9
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Gray View Post
    Fiberglass rides better in rough water due to it being heavier then Aluminum.

    There is a lot more to the ride than weight. I agree that heavier boats are not affected by waves as drastically, but hull design plays a bigger role in ride than weight from what I have experienced.

    Ak_Stick, Keep your head down over there. There are some great deals to be had in the Pacific NW for Sea sports. You can do real well for $70K if you do not mind travelling.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  10. #10
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    There is a lot more to the ride than weight. I agree that heavier boats are not affected by waves as drastically, but hull design plays a bigger role in ride than weight from what I have experienced.

    Ak_Stick, Keep your head down over there. There are some great deals to be had in the Pacific NW for Sea sports. You can do real well for $70K if you do not mind travelling.
    Agree, hull is a big reason to.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  11. #11
    Member DMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    1,412

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    There is a lot more to the ride than weight. I agree that heavier boats are not affected by waves as drastically, but hull design plays a bigger role in ride than weight from what I have experienced.

    Ak_Stick, Keep your head down over there. There are some great deals to be had in the Pacific NW for Sea sports. You can do real well for $70K if you do not mind travelling.
    I am definitely impressed with the ride of the GC. Between the 18 degree bottom and the weight your boat just cut through those 4 footers at full speed with no pounding! I can't wait!!!!
    ... aboard the 'Memory Maker' Making Memories one Wave at a Time!

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    344

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    There is a lot more to the ride than weight. I agree that heavier boats are not affected by waves as drastically, but hull design plays a bigger role in ride than weight from what I have experienced.

    Ak_Stick, Keep your head down over there. There are some great deals to be had in the Pacific NW for Sea sports. You can do real well for $70K if you do not mind travelling.
    Interesting point spoiled one regarding hull design. From the other side (I have a glass boat), I read somewhere that the reason glass boats ride better (and I'm convinced they do ) is mostly because of the hull design. They stated that the aluminum sheets can only be "twisted" so much from the bow to the stern along the hull length - ie that glass boats can have a much steeper hull angle near the bow to slice thru waves and flatten back out at the stern to basically the angle that most boats have because glass hulls are layed up in whatever angles are wanted and aren't constricted by the limits of aluminum . Now I am not a marine engineer but all of the aluminum hulls I have looked since I read this appeared to have a much flatter bow V than I have on my boat - anyone have any additional ifo??. Fiberglass IS heavier but I'd be interested to know how much. Also glass takes more maintanence and it can't be beached on the shore but I thought I should bring this up. Don't want to hijack this thread but just trying to supply my .02 cents.

    AK STICK - Come home safe, buy the boat that fufills your dream and hope to see you out there killing shrimp.

  13. #13
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bushboy View Post
    Interesting point spoiled one regarding hull design. From the other side (I have a glass boat), I read somewhere that the reason glass boats ride better (and I'm convinced they do ) is mostly because of the hull design. They stated that the aluminum sheets can only be "twisted" so much from the bow to the stern along the hull length - ie that glass boats can have a much steeper hull angle near the bow to slice thru waves and flatten back out at the stern to basically the angle that most boats have because glass hulls are layed up in whatever angles are wanted and aren't constricted by the limits of aluminum . Now I am not a marine engineer but all of the aluminum hulls I have looked since I read this appeared to have a much flatter bow V than I have on my boat - anyone have any additional ifo??. Fiberglass IS heavier but I'd be interested to know how much. Also glass takes more maintanence and it can't be beached on the shore but I thought I should bring this up. Don't want to hijack this thread but just trying to supply my .02 cents.

    AK STICK - Come home safe, buy the boat that fufills your dream and hope to see you out there killing shrimp.
    Aluminum boats have come along way. A lot of the custom builders like GC cut each piece with a CNC router table. Not only does this save a lot of time, but it ensures uniformity. The hull is then placed in a gig to get the desired deadrise both fore and aft. "Patience" is 18 degrees at the stern and in the 40's at the entry(depending on where you measure it). You can get a pretty awesome ride out of a metal boat these days as DMan can attest to. The day he was talking about we were heading out into Port Wells in 4-5 footers cruising at 30 mph. The kids did not even spill their drink boxes. The boys on the ferry "Chenega" hailed me because they were impressed how well we cruised through the chp. Good stuff.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  14. #14
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    Not that I know a ton but, I was a former boat owner prior to moving up here and am currently looking to get a boat ASAP...which according to the wife means 3 months to a year. I am only looking in the 40K ballpark max. I am looking used aluminum with outboard for several reasons. One, aluminum is much more durable I don't have a garage big enough to store it in so it has to sit out in the weather for at least 6 months. Second, you tend to get better economy out of an outboard. 6-10gph vs 10-14gph cruising out of a 22-26 boat. Finally, I/O's tend to be higher maintenance. Most of the folks I have talked to say an outboard with 500 hours on it isn't a big deal, an inboard has a bit of wear on it and will probably need some maintanence sometime soon. I realize this isn't a hard a fast rule but for gas engines the point is that outboards with similar hours on them have more life left in them. But the disadvantages of outboards is that the initial costs and replacement costs are quit a bit higher.

    A boat you should look at is the 24 Hewescraft Alaskan. You could probably get a new boat for the price you are looking at. Has a marine head, hardtop, you can sleep in it and it can handle big water. I also saw a Hewes Pacific Cruiser for the upper end of the ballpark you are talking about down in seattle. You might also check out Fish Rite as well. Also, look at the Weldcraft Ocean King. Good boat as well.

    Be safe over there. If you can't tell we all appreciate your service. If I have a boat when you get back I would be more than happy to take you out. Just look me up.

  15. #15

    Default

    I don't know much about GCs, but either the C-Dory or the SeaSport would be great boats. The SeaSport would ride better in the chop, but the C-Dory would have much better fuel economy. If you tow the SeaSport, then you may need a 3/4 ton truck, maybe a diesel. But the C-Dory could probably be towed with less. If I had the money, I would choose the SeaSport.

  16. #16
    Member bhollis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    255

    Default

    Recommend you also look at Osprey. Very similar to SeaSport. In fact, SeaSport has been building the Ospreys for the past several years.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    65

    Default

    I heard that GC was having a sale on their boats right now. It is some sort of pre-boat show sale. Not 100% sure what the deal was but I was thinking about stopping by just to see what they could do for me on a smaller boat. 22' range is what I have been looking for. Similar to a Searunner forward held with a soft top.
    Ryan Tollefsen
    Prudential Jack White Vista Real Estate

    Alaska Real Estate
    Anchorage Real Estate

  18. #18
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    Not to hijack this but does GC make smaller boats? On their site they only talk about the bigger boats which are way out of my price range. Would a smaller boat in the 22ft class be similar priced as a hewes?

  19. #19
    Member AK_Stick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Wasilla AK (for now)
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    I don't know much about GCs, but either the C-Dory or the SeaSport would be great boats. The SeaSport would ride better in the chop, but the C-Dory would have much better fuel economy. If you tow the SeaSport, then you may need a 3/4 ton truck, maybe a diesel. But the C-Dory could probably be towed with less. If I had the money, I would choose the SeaSport.
    that's a good point, but I own a gmc 2500 duramax diesel so towing wise, I'm outfitted for whatever I might buy

  20. #20
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK_Stick View Post
    that's a good point, but I own a gmc 2500 duramax diesel so towing wise, I'm outfitted for whatever I might buy
    Here something to do when you get home. Bum a ride with some of the ODD gang here. We all have different boats. After a few trips you will see the difference in boats and this should help you make your mind up.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •